News Archive - 2014

News Archive - 2014

Large-scale study raises hopes for development of E. coli vaccine

Large-scale study raises hopes for development of E. coli vaccine

Global comparison reveals surprisingly close relation between E. coli strains that cause traveller's diarrhoea

The largest ever study of the bacterium enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) has raised hopes that a global vaccine can be developed. This bacterium causes 400 thousand deaths and 400 million cases of diarrhoea each year in low- and middle-income countries as well as misery to many travellers to these regions.

World War I soldier helps in fight against dysentery

World War I soldier helps in fight against dysentery

Bacterial genome and the story of the soldier it infected pieced together in new study

A bacterial sample from a World War I soldier is helping researchers to tackle dysentery, a disease that kills hundreds of thousands of children under five each year in developing nations.

African genomes yield sickle cell insights

African genomes yield sickle cell insights

African collaboration unpicks disease variations by combining local genomic research with large-scale genome-wide association techniques.

A collaboration between research teams in Tanzania and the UK applied the power of the genome-wide association techniques to the genomes of 1,213 individuals in Tanzania to confirm whether or not the same variations are at work in an East African population compared with West African populations and to identify possible new ones.

Sanger Institute researcher collaborates on story of love and flu

Sanger Institute researcher collaborates on story of love and flu

Radio play by Sarah Woods and Paul Kellam to air on BBC Radio 4

A radio drama about love and flu produced in collaboration with Professor Paul Kellam, a member of Faculty at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, starts on Radio 4 on Monday 27 October 2014.

Sanger Institute researcher becomes Suffrage Science awardee

Sanger Institute researcher becomes Suffrage Science awardee

Professor Ele Zeggini receives heirloom in recognition of her contribution to science

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Faculty member Professor Ele Zeggini became a Suffrage Science awardee last week in a ceremony held at the Science Museum's Dana Centre. Previous awardee and fellow Sanger Institute researcher Dr Sarah Teichmann passed on a beautiful piece of heirloom jewellery to her in recognition of her contribution to human genetics.

Malaria study raises evolutionary questions

Malaria study raises evolutionary questions

Large-scale research shows we have adapted to resist deadly parasite

A study of genetic variants associated with cases of severe malaria has successfully integrated data from almost 30,000 participants across multiple locations in Africa, Asia and Oceania. The study has achieved insights into the evolutionary battle between the malaria parasite and human populations that could not have been achieved by smaller studies in each location.

Journey from stem cell to blood cell uncovered

Journey from stem cell to blood cell uncovered

BLUEPRINT study catalogues events that regulate blood cell creation

Researchers have catalogued previously undetected steps in the process by which stem cells become red and white blood cells. Errors in this process, which is called haematopoiesis, can lead to blood disorders and cancers.

Protein controlling gut's protective force field identified

Protein controlling gut's protective force field identified

Immune-system receptor encourages growth of bacterial shield during illness

Scientists have identified a protein in the human intestine that helps to protect against attack from opportunistic bacteria that strike when our defences are down. The protein receptor is activated during illness, producing a force field on the gut's surface made of a sugary substance that encourages the growth of protective bacteria.

Gene variant that dramatically reduces 'bad' lipids

Gene variant that dramatically reduces 'bad' lipids

Role of rare APOC3 variant in reducing triglyceride levels identified using UK10K data

Research using data collected from around 4,000 healthy people in the UK has enabled scientists to identify a rare genetic variant that dramatically reduces levels of certain types of lipids in the blood. The study is the first to emerge from the UK10K Project's cohort of samples from the general public and demonstrates the power of whole genome sequencing at scale.

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