Sanger Seminar Series

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Virtual Sanger Seminar series

We are hosting a series of monthly freely available and open virtual seminars, showcasing how our researchers are tackling some of the greatest challenges in human health and disease. From using genomic approaches to map all cell types in the human body, understand how cancer develops, and track the evolution and spread of global diseases, our senior scientists and faculty will present the latest developments in their field.

How to access the Seminars

The virtual seminar series will take place monthly and is freely available and open to all who wish to attend: https://stream.venue-av.com/e/sanger_seminars/login
Password (case sensitive): Sanger2020

 

Upcoming Seminars

Previous Sanger Seminars

Catch up on our previous talks

19 November - Professor Dominic Kwiatkowski

Charting the evolutionary journey towards malaria elimination

Professor Dominic Kwiatkowski is Head of the Parasites and Microbes research programme at the Sanger Institute.

In his talk, Dominic describes how he uses genomics to probe the ongoing evolutionary arms race between parasites, mosquitoes and human populations that are afflicted by malaria, and how this knowledge can be translated into new strategies for combatting drug and insecticide resistance.

Q&A with Professor Dominic Kwiatkowski

The Q&A session with Professor Dominic Kwiatkowski, who leads the Parasites and Microbes research Programme, was hosted by the Sanger Institute’s:

21 October - Professor Mark Blaxter

Busy ’bout the tree of life: What telomere-to-telomere genome sequences tell us about global biodiversity

Professor Mark Blaxter leads the Tree of Life Programme which has as an overarching goal the sequencing to high quality of all species on Earth.

Discover how he and his colleagues are using genomics to:

  • understand the deep roots of biodiversity,
  • delve into the unique biology of threatened organisms and
  • provide tools for conservation and mitigation of climate change and other threats.

Q&A with
Professor Mark Blaxter

The Q&A session with Professor Mark Blaxter, who leads the Tree of Life Programme, was hosted by the Sanger Institute’s:

16 September - Dr Emma Davenport

Stratifying sepsis patients through transcriptomic profiling

Dr Emma Davenport, Group Leader in the Human Genetics Programme at the Sanger Institute discussed somatic mutations, and how her research team is using gene expression data to understand how individuals respond to sepsis, a life-threatening condition caused by the dysregulated host response to infection.

Q&A with Dr Emma Davenport

The Q&A session with Dr Emma Davenport, Group Leader in the Human Genetics Programme, was hosted by the Sanger Institute’s:

19 August - Dr Peter Campbell

Somatic mutations in normal tissues

Dr Peter Campbell, Head of Cancer, Ageing and Somatic Mutation programme at the Sanger Institute discussed somatic mutations, and how researchers are characterising the landscape of mutations in cells to provide insights into normal tissue development and maintenance, cancer evolution, diseases other than cancer, and ageing.

Q&A with Dr Peter Campbell

The Q&A session with Dr Peter Campbell, Head of Cancer, Ageing and Somatic Mutation programme, was hosted by the Sanger Institute’s:

15 July - Dr Sarah Teichmann

Human Cell Atlas: Mapping the body one cell at a time

The Human Cell Atlas is an ambitious global initiative aiming to create a comprehensive reference map of all human cells—the fundamental units of life—as a basis understanding human health and diagnosing, monitoring, and treating disease.

In this talk Dr Sarah Teichmann explains how the Human Cell Atlas is providing unprecedented understanding of human cells and tissue architecture in health and disease including reproductive biology, auto-immune disease and Covid-19 infection.

Q&A with Dr Sarah Teichmann

The Q&A session with Dr Sarah Teichmann, Head of the Cellular Genetics research programme, was hosted by the Sanger Institute’s: