News Archive - 2009

News Archive - 2009

UK scientific breakthrough to help animals worldwide

UK scientific breakthrough to help animals worldwide

Getting a grip on the Strangles pathogen - leading UK scientific institutes publish new genome sequences

A consortium including the Animal Health Trust, the University of Cambridge and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has solved the DNA sequences of Streptococcus equi - the causative agent of Strangles, and Streptococcus zooepidemicus, a versatile relative that causes a range of diseases in animals, including horses and dogs, and occasionally humans.

Genome-wide association scan reveals the landscape of inherited variability in response to warfarin dose

Genome-wide association scan reveals the landscape of inherited variability in response to warfarin dose

Genes determining the optimal dose of therapeutic warfarin have now been identified in a large-scale, genome-wide association scan

Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Uppsala University Hospital, and the Karolinska Institute have found common sequence variants in three genes - VKORC1, CYP2C9 and CYP4F2 - that explain over 40 per cent of the variability in the warfarin dose needed to achieve proper blood thinning. The study, published March 20 in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics, assayed more than 1000 warfarin patients at approximately 370,000 chromosomal variants densely covering the human genome.

G2C Online launches

G2C Online launches

Website to explain brain science to students, patients, general public

After three years of work, a collaboration between Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute scientists and a web development team at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory has put the finishing touches on a project targeted for non-scientists that aims to "connect the dots" in several important areas of brain research. G2C Online has been modelled on research emanating from the Genes to Cognition Research Programme at the Sanger Institute.

Could Genetics Improve Warfarin Dosing?

Could Genetics Improve Warfarin Dosing?

New Research Says Yes: Now for the Clinical Trial

An international team of researchers have developed a way to use genetic information from patients that could help doctors better determine optimal doses of the common blood-thinning drug, warfarin. The results of the analysis - based on information from thousands of genetically and geographically diverse patients - are published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Simple yeast leads to understanding ourselves

Simple yeast leads to understanding ourselves

Study of evolution in Saccharomyces drives the 1000 Genomes Project

A new study uncovers the evolutionary history of the organism that gives us fermented beer and risen bread. Using sequencing technology researchers have, for the first time, shown that humans have tamed yeast on multiple occasions in their history.

The genetics of heart disease

The genetics of heart disease

Two studies uncover novel genome regions associated with heart attack

Two new studies pick out four genome regions that influence the risk of heart disease. The studies, published in Nature Genetics, included more than 20,000 heart disease patients and involved a total of more than 33,000 samples.

The nonsense in our genes

The nonsense in our genes

One in 200 genes superfluous?

One in 200 of our human genes can be inactivated with no detectable effect on our health. A study by Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute scientists raises new questions about the effects of gene loss on our wellbeing and evolution.

The worst luck in the world?

The worst luck in the world?

The heart disease mutation carried by 60 million

Heart disease is the number one killer in the world and India carries more than its share of this burden. Moreover, the problem is set to rise: it is predicted that by 2010 India's population will suffer approximately 60 per cent of the world's heart disease. Today, an international team of 25 scientists from four countries provides a clue to why this is so.

Pages