News Archive

News Archive

From childhood cancer to mapping human development: Pioneering scientist awarded 2019 Foulkes Foundation medal

Dr Muzlifa Haniffa photographed in the Super Resolution Imaging Lab, Newcastle University

From childhood cancer to mapping human development: Pioneering scientist awarded 2019 Foulkes Foundation medal

Congratulations to Professor Muzlifah Haniffa, who has been recognised for her work on the immune system and childhood cancer

Professor Muzlifah Haniffa from Newcastle University and the Wellcome Sanger Institute has won the 2019 Foulkes Foundation Medal for outstanding contributions to biomedical science.

Dr Sam Behjati wins Liddy Shriver Early Career Research Award

Dr Sam Behjati wins Liddy Shriver Early Career Research Award

Dr Sam Behjati wins Liddy Shriver Early Career Research Award

Congratulations to Sanger Institute cancer researcher, Dr Sam Behjati, who has been recognised for his work in sarcoma cancer genomics

Dr Sam Behjati has received this year’s Liddy Shriver Early Career Research Award, given by the Connective Tissue Oncology Society (CTOS). The Award highlights Dr Behjati’s internationally recognised, outstanding contributions as an early-career researcher working in the sarcoma field.

New malaria drug targets identified in liver stage of life cycle

Liver cells infected with Plasmodium berghei parasites

New malaria drug targets identified in liver stage of life cycle

Hope that new liver-stage drugs will help to counter the threat of antimicrobial resistance to current blood-stage medicines

New research into the different life stages of malaria parasites has identified promising areas for new drug targets aimed at disrupting the parasite’s invasion of the liver. Scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Bern and Umeå University discovered seven metabolic pathways that the parasite needs to infect the liver, where the parasite multiplies rapidly before invading the blood and causing malaria.

Ambitious project to map genomes of all life on British Isles funded by Wellcome

Ambitious project to map genomes of all life on British Isles funded by Wellcome

Ambitious project to map genomes of all life on British Isles funded by Wellcome

An unprecedented insight to the diverse range of species on the British Isles will be made possible by Wellcome funding to the Darwin Tree of Life Project

The £9.4m funding from Wellcome will support researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and nine other partner institutions involved in the Darwin Tree of Life project to launch the first phase of sequencing all the species on the British Isles. This will see the teams collect and barcode around 8000 key British species, and deliver high-quality genomes of 2000 species.

Measles infection wipes our immune system's memory, leaving us vulnerable to other diseases

Measles infection wipes our immune system's memory, leaving us vulnerable to other diseases

Measles infection wipes our immune system's memory, leaving us vulnerable to other diseases

Research explains why children often catch other infections after measles, and highlights the importance of vaccination

Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, University of Amsterdam and their collaborators revealed that the measles virus deletes part of the immune system’s memory, removing previously existing immunity to other infections, in both humans and ferrets. Importantly, the team showed for the first time that measles resets the human immune system back to an immature baby-like state with only limited ability to respond to new infections.

Scientists to Create a “Gut Cell Atlas” With Funding from the Helmsley Charitable Trust

HCAlogohome3.png

Scientists to Create a “Gut Cell Atlas” With Funding from the Helmsley Charitable Trust

Researchers will examine both healthy and diseased intestinal tissue to identify key cell types involved in Crohn’s disease

The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust announced $13 million in new grants to create a Gut Cell Atlas, cataloguing the many cell types in the small and large intestines. The initiative aims to understand distinct cell functions and interactions in human health and Crohn’s disease. Helmsley’s Gut Cell Atlas initiative is part of the larger international Human Cell Atlas collaboration

Accumulation of DNA mutations found in healthy liver leads to disease

Microscope image of liver tissue affected by cirrhosis

Accumulation of DNA mutations found in healthy liver leads to disease

Largest study of its kind seeks to better understand how liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma develop

New insights into the journey from health to disease in the human liver have been made by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, the University of Cambridge and their collaborators. In the largest study of its kind, the team documented in unprecedented detail how the accumulation of changes in our DNA over time, known as mutations, evolves during the development of chronic liver disease and liver cancer.

Uncovering the pathway to colon cancer

Using laser capture microscopy to take samples from colon tissue

Uncovering the pathway to colon cancer

Scientists identify patterns of genetic changes in healthy colon tissue, giving insight into the very earliest stages of cancer

The hidden world of genetic changes, or mutations, in healthy colon tissue has been uncovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. The team developed technology to sequence the genomes of small numbers of colon cells, allowing them to study genetic mutations in unprecedented detail. Researchers found complex patterns of mutations, including changes in cancer genes, and a huge variability of mutations both within and between people.

Sanger Institute refutes allegations of misuse of African DNA data from partner institutions

announcement.jpg

Sanger Institute refutes allegations of misuse of African DNA data from partner institutions

Two investigations by two separate experts found that no wrongdoing took place

The inaccurate allegations refer to specific research that aimed to support scientific discovery with partners working in Africa. The Sanger Institute has not commercialised any products based on this research and it has not received and will not financially benefit from any revenues.

Resurrection of over 50,000-year-old gene reveals how malaria parasite jumped from gorillas to humans

Resurrection of over 50,000-year-old gene reveals how malaria parasite jumped from gorillas to humans

Resurrection of over 50,000-year-old gene reveals how malaria parasite jumped from gorillas to humans

Discovery of molecular pathway is valuable example of how a pathogen can switch from one host species to another

For the first time, scientists have uncovered the likely series of events that led to the world’s deadliest malaria parasite being able to jump from gorillas to humans. Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the University of Montpellier reconstructed an approximately 50,000-year-old gene sequence that was acquired by the ancestor of Plasmodium falciparum, giving it the ability to infect human red blood cells. 

Pages