News Archive

News Archive

Jumping genes can cause rare developmental disorders in children

Jumping genes can cause rare developmental disorders in children. Image credit: Pixabay

Jumping genes can cause rare developmental disorders in children

Diagnoses achieved for three more children in the Deciphering Developmental Disorders project

The largest study of its kind into childhood developmental disorders has discovered that jumping genes cause genetic changes in some patients with undiagnosed neurodevelopmental diseases. The research has provided genetic diagnoses for three children enrolled in the Deciphering Developmental Disorders project, which will help the families access support and understand the disease risks for any future children.

First cell map of developing human liver reveals how blood and immune systems develop

First cell map of developing human liver reveals how blood and immune system develops

First cell map of developing human liver reveals how blood and immune systems develop

Resource improves understanding of normal development and will support efforts to tackle diseases, such as leukaemia, that can form during early life

In a world first, scientists have created the human developmental liver cell atlas that provides crucial insights into how the blood and immune systems develop in the foetus. It maps changes in the cellular landscape of the developing liver between the first and second trimesters of pregnancy, including how stem cells from the liver seed other tissues to support the high demand for oxygen needed for growth.
 

Fresh insights could lead to new treatments for liver disease

Liver fibrosis. Image credit: Neil Henderson, University of Edinburgh

Fresh insights could lead to new treatments for liver disease

The fight against liver disease could be helped by the discovery of cells that cause liver scarring

Scientists have identified new sub-types of cells that, when they interact, accelerate the scarring process in diseased livers.

Sanger Institute cancer researcher’s innovation recognised

Mathew Garnett has received a National Cancer Research Institute Excellence Award

Sanger Institute cancer researcher’s innovation recognised

Congratulations to Dr Mathew Garnett who has received a National Cancer Research Institute Excellence Award for his research into the use of next-generation organoid models of cancer

Dr Mathew Garnett has received one of the first Excellence Awards given by the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI). The Innovation Award highlights the work of Dr Garnett and his team in producing hundreds of patient-derived 3D organoid cultures as a community resource to accelerate cancer research.

Human kidney map charts our growing immune defence

Section of human kidney cortex

Human kidney map charts our growing immune defence

New cell atlas reveals immune cells present in zones of human kidney

The first cell atlas of the human kidney’s immune system has been created after scientists mapped nearly 70,000 individual kidney cells from early life and adults. Researchers generated the atlas and used it to map immune cells in the kidney. This shows for the first time how the kidney’s immune system develops during early life, and strengthens after birth and as we mature into adults, with implications for tackling kidney disease and transplant rejection

Scientists hone in on DNA differences behind immune diseases

Scientists hone in on DNA differences behind immune diseases. Image credit: Shutterstock

Scientists hone in on DNA differences behind immune diseases

Search could help find drug targets for developing new treatments

Scientists are one step closer to discovering the causes of immune diseases such as asthma, multiple sclerosis and arthritis. Research from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, GSK and Biogen, under the Open Targets initiative, has shown that thousands of differences in DNA between individuals, associated with immune diseases, are linked with the switching-on of a specific subtype of immune cells.

Salmonella responsible for bloodstream infections in central Africa resistant to nearly all drugs

Salmonella responsible for bloodstream infections in central Africa resistant to nearly all drugs

Salmonella responsible for bloodstream infections in central Africa resistant to nearly all drugs

Strain of dangerous pathogen shown to have developed resistance to last-line-of-defence drug

The first extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of Salmonella Typhimurium, a pathogen which is responsible for millions of bloodstream infections per year in sub-Saharan Africa, have been identified in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Drug-resistance has increased in successive groups of S. Typhimurium over time. These new strains are resistant to all but one of the commonly available drugs in the DRC, with one sample showing reduced susceptibility to this final antibiotic.

Babies' gut bacteria affected by delivery method, Baby Biome project shows

Babies' gut bacteria affected by delivery method, baby biome project shows. Image credit: PublicDomainPictures

Babies' gut bacteria affected by delivery method, Baby Biome project shows

Vaginal delivery promotes mother's gut bacteria in baby's gut

This largest ever study of neonatal microbiomes revealed that the microbiome of vaginally delivered newborns did not come from the mother’s vaginal bacteria, but from the mother’s gut. In contrast, babies born via caesarean section tended to have more bacteria associated with hospital environments in their guts.

500,000 whole human genomes will be a game-changer for research into human diseases

ukbiobank_home.jpg

500,000 whole human genomes will be a game-changer for research into human diseases

Following on from a successful pilot at the Sanger Institute, we are leading a project to sequence the genomes of all UK Biobank volunteers to power the next wave of genetic and health research

In a major advance for public health and for the UK’s global leadership in genomics, a £200m project involving the government, charity, researchers and four leading pharmaceutical companies, was announced today (11 September). The Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) project will become a game-changing resource accessible to the global scientific community to understand, diagnose, treat and prevent life-changing diseases such as cancer and dementia.

Brown trout genome will help explain species' genetic superpowers

Brown trout (Salmo trutta) are one of the most genetically diverse vertebrates, it could comprise up to 50 distinct species. The newly-sequenced brown trout genome will allow scientists and conservationists to better understand the fish's genetic roots

Brown trout genome will help explain species' genetic superpowers

Eagerly awaited reference genome will allow conservationists to understand how the fish adapts to marine and freshwater environments

Better conservation and management of fish stocks is on the horizon, after the completion of the brown trout reference genome by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. The genome will help settle a longstanding debate about whether the physically-varied brown trout is actually a single species or several, and give insights into their ability to quickly adapt to multiple environments.

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