News Archive

News Archive

Genetic study reveals possible new routes to treating osteoarthritis

Genetic study reveals possible new routes to treating osteoarthritis

Genetic study reveals possible new routes to treating osteoarthritis

Scientists discover new genes and biological pathways linked to osteoarthritis, which could help identify starting points for new medicines

Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, GSK and their collaborators analysed the genomes of over 77,000 people with osteoarthritis. The findings, published in Nature Genetics, revealed new genes and biological pathways linked to the condition, which could help identify starting points for new medicines. It also opportunities for repurposing existing medicines.

CRISPR study reveals new immune system regulators

Th2 cells - new CRISPR study by Sanger Institute reveals new immune system regulators. Image credit: NIAID

CRISPR study reveals new immune system regulators

Map of T cell regulation could aid development of drugs that could activate the immune system

Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators mapped the most important genes for controlling T helper cells, and identified several new potential regulatory genes. Published in Cell, these findings could help scientists develop new treatments to activate the immune system against tumours or infection.

Mystery of Yemen cholera epidemic solved

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Mystery of Yemen cholera epidemic solved

Bacteria's genomes reveal that the most likely source of the disease came from Eastern Africa and entered Yemen with the migration of people in and out of the region

Scientists discovered that the cholera strain causing the Yemen epidemic is related to a strain first seen in 2012 in South Asia that has spread globally, but the Yemeni strain did not arrive directly from South Asia or the Middle East. This particular cholera strain was circulating and causing outbreaks in Eastern Africa between 2013 and 2014, prior to appearing in Yemen in 2016.

Statement from GRL Board accepting the findings of the independent investigation into a whistleblowing claim

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Statement from GRL Board accepting the findings of the independent investigation into a whistleblowing claim

Genome Research Limited Chair and Director of the Wellcome Sanger Institute outline steps the Institute will put in place to improve its processes

In April 2018 allegations were made against the Sanger Institute Director and other senior members of the Institute in a whistleblowing claim. An independent investigation into the allegations, commissioned by the Board of Directors (the charity’s trustees), was carried out by a barrister, and delivered in October. The allegations were not upheld. The Board of Directors has carefully considered the investigation report and has accepted its findings.

Bird migration and conservation clues in robin and Turtle dove genomes

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Bird migration and conservation clues in robin and Turtle dove genomes

The genomes were read by the Sanger Institute and its partners, in celebration of Sanger’s 25th anniversary

The genomes, completed today (21 December) will enable researchers to explore the genetic switches controlling bird migration and give insight into the magneto receptors that help robins ‘see’ the Earth’s magnetic fields for navigation. The Turtle dove genome will help conservation efforts to save one of the UK’s fastest declining bird species.

From eye drops to potential leukaemia treatment

Eye drops lead to potential leukaemia treatment

From eye drops to potential leukaemia treatment

Ingredient in pre-clinical treatment for retinal neovascular disease targets gene associated with acute myeloid leukaemia

Sanger Institute researchers and their collaborators discovered that SRPK1 was the target of a compound being developed in eye drops for the treatment of retinal neovascular disease. The team found that the compound strongly inhibited the growth of several MLL-rearranged AML cell lines, but did not inhibit the growth of normal blood stem cells

New strains of hepatitis C found in Africa

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New strains of hepatitis C found in Africa

Study could inform hepatitis C treatment and vaccine development worldwide

Three new strains of hepatitis C virus have been found circulating in the general population in sub-Saharan Africa. This discovery could inform hepatitis C vaccine development worldwide and suggests clinical trials of patients in the region are urgently needed. Published in the journal Hepatology, the study could assist the World Health Organisation’s aim of eliminating hepatitis C globally.

Sanger’s cloud computing wins award

High performance computing community recognises pioneering work of Sanger’s scientific IT teams

Sanger’s cloud computing wins award

High performance computing community recognises pioneering work of Sanger’s scientific IT teams

Sanger’s use of cloud computing has been recognised by HPCwire, the journal of high performance and data-intensive computing. The IT team won the Readers’ Choice award for Best Use of High Performance Computing in the Cloud

Wellcome Genome Campus wins silver watermark to recognise its support for public engagement

Wellcome Genome Campus wins silver watermark to recognise its support for public engagement

Wellcome Genome Campus wins silver watermark to recognise its support for public engagement

Award reflects work to nurture a culture where public engagement is supported and encouraged

The long-standing efforts of the Wellcome Genome Campus to engage and inspire the public have today (29 November 2018) been rewarded with the Silver Engage Watermark from the National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement (NCCPE). The Engage Watermark recognises strategic support for public engagement across the organisation, as well as the commitment to develop plans for the future.

Largest study of CRISPR-Cas9 mutations creates prediction tool for gene editing

Largest study of CRISPR-Cas9 mutations creates prediction tool for gene editing

Largest study of CRISPR-Cas9 mutations creates prediction tool for gene editing

Prediction resource could make CRISPR-Cas9 editing more reliable

The largest study of CRISPR action to date has developed a method to predict the exact mutations CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing can introduce to a cell. Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute edited 40,000 different pieces of DNA and analysed a thousand million resulting DNA sequences to develop the machine learning predictive tool. Reported in Nature Biotechnology (27 November) the new resource will help make CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing more reliable, cheaper and more efficient.

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