News Archive

News Archive

Sanger Institute animal research facility to close

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Sanger Institute animal research facility to close

Following a full review, the Sanger Institute will be closing its animal research facility

The difficult decision has been made after consultation with the Sanger Institute board and the Genome Research Limited board, which has representation from Wellcome. The facility is expected to close over the next few years.

CRISPR catches out critical cancer changes

Pancreatic cancer cells: one of 43 types of cancer studied by the Wellcome Sanger Institute for gene fusions

CRISPR catches out critical cancer changes

Researchers reveal which gene fusions are critical for the growth of cancer cells and identify a new drug target for multiple cancers

In the first large-scale analysis of cancer gene fusions, researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators used CRISPR to uncover which gene fusions are critical for the growth of cancer cells. The team also identified a new gene fusion that presents a novel drug target for multiple cancers, including brain and ovarian cancers. The results give more certainty for the use of specific gene fusions to diagnose and guide the treatment of patients.

Honouring research excellence: Dr Sam Behjati wins award for work to unravel the identity and origin of childhood cancers

Dr Sam Behjati has received the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPH) Dr Simon Newell Early Career Investigator Award

Honouring research excellence: Dr Sam Behjati wins award for work to unravel the identity and origin of childhood cancers

The 2019 recipient of the Dr Simon Newell Early Career Investigator Award has been announced as Dr Sam Behjati, whose career to date has focused on the developmental origins of childhood cancers

This annual honour is open to outstanding clinician researchers early in their academic career, and is named in memory of Dr Simon Newell – a renowned and widely respected neonatologist and paediatrician who had a passion for encouraging the next generation of paediatric clinicians and researchers.

Lead cancer researcher elected to Academy of Medical Sciences

Peter Campbell elected to Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences

Lead cancer researcher elected to Academy of Medical Sciences

Dr Peter Campbell receives prestigious Fellowship for his work in cancer genomics

The award honours scientists whose research has advanced medical science, delivered cutting-edge research discoveries, and produced benefits for patients and wider society. Dr Campbell's research has been instrumental in developing new ways to explore and understand the processes that cause the development of cancer.

Crusaders made love and war, genetic study finds

Crusaders made love and war, genetic study finds

Crusaders made love and war, genetic study finds

Sanger Institute researchers have produced whole-genome sequences from skeletons discovered in a 13th Century burial pit in Sidon, Lebanon

The team report that three individuals were Europeans of diverse origins, including Spain and Sardinia, four were near Easterners who had been recruited to the fight, and two individuals had mixed genetic ancestry, suggesting they were the descendants of mixed relationships between Crusaders and near Easterners.

Head of Human Genetics elected Fellow of the Royal Society

Head of Human Genetics elected Fellow of the Royal Society

Head of Human Genetics elected Fellow of the Royal Society

Matthew Hurles is recognised for his pioneering work in identifying the genetic basis of undiagnosed developmental disorders and paving the way for national genetic diagnostic services worldwide

Today (17 April) Dr Matthew Hurles has been elected to Fellowship of the Royal Society, the UK's most prestigious scientific organisation. His work has provided many hundreds of families with clinical diagnoses and laid the foundations of national clinical genetic screening services in the UK and worldwide

Rare genetic change provides clues to pancreas development

Rare genetic change provides clues to pancreas development

Rare genetic change provides clues to pancreas development

Understanding pancreas formation could aid research into type 1 diabetes treatments

Researchers have discovered a key clue into the development of the pancreas and brain by studying rare patients born without a pancreas. The study also identified an unexpected pathway in human pancreas development and confirmed this in mice.

Mice reveal 38 new genes involved in hearing loss

Mice reveal 38 new genes involved in hearing loss

Mice reveal 38 new genes involved in hearing loss

Molecular pathways revealed could identify potential drug targets for restoring hearing

Multiple new genes involved in hearing loss have been revealed in a large study of mouse mutants by researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, King’s College London, and colleagues. The new genes reveal the metabolic pathways and regulatory processes involved in hearing.

New cancer drug targets accelerate path to precision medicine

New cancer drug targets accelerate path to precision medicine. Image credit: Wellcome Sanger Institute, Genome Research Limited

New cancer drug targets accelerate path to precision medicine

Researchers discovered thousands of genes essential for cancer’s survival and ranked which ones show the most promise as drug targets for developing new treatments

The datasets produced in this new study lay the foundations for producing the Cancer Dependency Map, a detailed rulebook for the precision treatment of cancer.

Genetic code of WWI soldier's cholera mapped

British Expeditionary Force on the Western Front, 1914-1915. Image credit: Imperial War Museums (Wikimedia Commons)

Genetic code of WWI soldier's cholera mapped

The bacterium was isolated from a British soldier and stored for over 100 years before being revived and sequenced

The oldest publicly-available strain of the cholera-causing bacterial species, Vibrio cholerae, has had its genetic code read for the first time. The results show that this strain is a unique, non-toxigenic strain of V. cholerae that’s distantly related to the strains of bacteria causing cholera pandemics today and in the past.

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