News Archive

News Archive

Wellcome Sanger Institute calls for the free movement of scientists across European borders following Brexit

Wellcome Sanger Institute calls for the free movement of scientists across European borders following Brexit

Wellcome Sanger Institute calls for the free movement of scientists across European borders following Brexit

The Institute has provided evidence for the UK Government Science and Technology Committee’s inquiry into an immigration system that works for science and innovation

In response to the UK Parliament Science and Technology Committee’s inquiry, the Sanger Institute has made a number of recommendations: that the current immigration system is not fit for purpose and therefore it should not be transposed onto EEA nationals, once the UK leaves the EU and that Students from EEA countries who have completed undergraduate qualifications in the UK should be given time to remain in the UK to allow them to look for work.

Genomics offers new treatment options for infants with range of soft tissue tumours

Genomics offers new treatment options for infants with range of soft tissue tumours

Genomics offers new treatment options for infants with range of soft tissue tumours

Scientists uncover the genetic changes causing a group of related infant cancers

The genetic causes of a group of related infant cancers have been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Wuerzburg and their collaborators. Whole genome sequencing of tumours revealed mutations which are targetable by existing drugs used to treat lung cancer and melanoma.

Genetic discovery will help clinicians identify aggressive versus benign bone tumours

Genetic discovery will help clinicians identify aggressive versus benign bone tumours

Genetic discovery will help clinicians identify aggressive versus benign bone tumours

A genetic change affecting the transcription factor, FOS is specific to osteoblastoma, distinguishing it from osteosarcoma

The first genetic marker for the bone tumour, osteoblastoma, has been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. The results, published in Nature Communications, will help clinicians correctly distinguish benign osteoblastoma tumours from aggressive osteosarcoma tumours and direct the correct treatment.

Cambridge LIFE LAB project wins place in Europe's largest public science event

Sanger Institute is part of the Cambridge LIFE LAB project that has won a place in Europe's largest public science event: European Researchers' Night

Cambridge LIFE LAB project wins place in Europe's largest public science event

LIFE LAB will be led by Wellcome Genome Campus Public Engagement, and delivered by a consortium including the Wellcome Sanger Institute

Five Cambridge science institutions have won a bid to engage the local region with science as part of European Researchers Night*, the largest public science event in Europe. LIFE LAB is one of four UK initiatives awarded funding from the European Commission. It will establish a programme of pop-up science events in shopping centres, cafes and music venues across Cambridgeshire on 28th September 2018 and again on 27th September 2019.

Microbiotica enters into microbiome collaboration with Genentech

Sanger Institute spin-out company Microbiotica

Microbiotica enters into microbiome collaboration with Genentech

Sanger Institute spin out company signs strategic collaboration to apply its leading microbiome Reference Genome Database and Culture Collection to discover microbiome biomarker signatures and therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel disease

Microbiotica, a leading player in microbiome-based therapeutics spun out of the Wellcome Sanger Institute, today announced that it has entered into a multi-year strategic collaboration with Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, to discover, develop and commercialise biomarkers, targets and medicines for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Wellcome Sanger Institute sequences reference genomes of 3,000 dangerous bacteria

Wellcome Sanger Institute sequences reference genomes of 3,000 dangerous bacteria

Wellcome Sanger Institute sequences reference genomes of 3,000 dangerous bacteria

Gonorrhoea, deadly plague and dysentery among collection of bacterial genomes now publicly available through collaboration with Pacific Biosciences

The genomes of more than 3,000 bacteria, including some of the world’s most dangerous, have been sequenced by researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute in collaboration with Pacific Biosciences (PacBio). Infecting tens of millions of people worldwide every year, these bacteria have been collected by the National Collection of Type Cultures (NCTC) and include deadly strains of plague, dysentery and cholera.

New online course introduces bioinformatics to address skills gap

New online course introduces bioinformatics to address skills gap

New online course introduces bioinformatics to address skills gap

The free course ‘Bacterial Genomes: From DNA to protein function using bioinformatics’ was developed by researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute

The course ‘Bacterial Genomes: From DNA to protein function using bioinformatics’ was developed by researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute. Designed to teach researchers, students and health care professionals worldwide how to use online computational tools and databases to understand the roles bacterial genes play in health and disease, the course is free, and is open for enrolment now, with the course starting on 11 June 2018.

Deadly malaria’s evolution revealed

Plasmodium falciparum is the only parasite from the Laverania family that has successfully adapted to transfer from gorillas to infect humans, and subsequently spread all over the world

Deadly malaria’s evolution revealed

Study shows Plasmodium falciparum emerged earlier than thought and gives clues to how deadly parasites arise

The evolutionary path of the deadliest human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, has been revealed for the first time. This parasite is a member of the Laverania parasite family that only infect the great apes including humans, chimpanzees and gorillas. Scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators estimate that Plasmodium falciparum emerged as a human-specific parasite species earlier than previously thought. The study in Nature Microbiology gives clues to how deadly parasites emerge.

Gonorrhoea surveillance study maps antibiotic resistance across Europe

The first European-wide genomic survey of gonorrhoea has mapped antibiotic resistance in this sexually transmitted disease throughout the continent

Gonorrhoea surveillance study maps antibiotic resistance across Europe

Genomic approach could help doctors monitor emerging resistance and prescribe most effective antibiotics in the future

Reported in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, the study has also established an open genomic database of gonorrhoea. The new resource will support real-time ongoing surveillance of gonorrhoea worldwide, which public health officials could use to monitor which strains of gonorrhoea are present globally and where new antibiotic resistance is emerging.

Sanger’s Head of Cancer, Ageing and Somatic Mutation Programme honoured by EMBO

Dr Peter Campbell becomes an elected member of the European Molecular Biology Organization

Sanger’s Head of Cancer, Ageing and Somatic Mutation Programme honoured by EMBO

Dr Peter Campbell becomes an elected member of the European Molecular Biology Organization

Today (14 May 2018) Dr Peter Campbell joins 61 fellow researchers from 24 countries in being elected to membership of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO). EMBO was created to promote excellence in molecular life sciences in Europe and each year recognises new members on the basis of scientific excellence.

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