News Archive

News Archive

Cancer comparison across species highlights new drug target

Cancer comparison across species highlights new drug targets

Cancer comparison across species highlights new drug target

Scientists discover key genes for mucosal melanoma in humans, dogs and horses that help prioritise targets for new cancer therapies

The results, reported in Nature Communications, give insights into how cancer evolves across the tree of life and could guide the development of new therapies.

Almost 2,000 unknown bacteria discovered in the human gut

Almost 2,000 unknown bacteria discovered in the human gut

Almost 2,000 unknown bacteria discovered in the human gut

Researchers identify novel gut bacteria species and call for more data from beyond Europe and North America

Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and EMBL’s European Bioinformatics Institute have identified almost 2,000 bacterial species living in the human gut. These species are yet to be cultured in the lab. The team used a range of computational methods to analyse samples from individuals worldwide.

Sanger Institute steps up commitment to Equality, Diversity and Inclusion in Science

Equality Diversity and Inclusion in Science group

Sanger Institute steps up commitment to Equality, Diversity and Inclusion in Science

The Institute has joined a new coalition to remove biases in all aspects of life science research, including staff, experiment design, research subjects and study goals

Building on its ongoing work with Athena SWAN to address equality imbalances, the Institute is seeking to further address the wider issues of equality and diversity that can affect both the makeup of its scientific staff and the ability of its scientific samples to represent a diversity of ethnicities and gender.

Study reveals how immune cells target different tissues

Study reveals how immune cells target different tissues. Image credit: Peter Lane and Fiona McConnell, Wellcome Images

Study reveals how immune cells target different tissues

Tissue-specific receptors and adaptations enable localisation of T regulatory cells

For the first time, researchers have revealed the different molecular identities of important immune cells, called T regulatory cells, in peripheral non-lymphoid tissues like skin and colon. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and collaborators revealed that T regulatory cells have tissue-specific receptors and other adaptations, allowing them to move to the correct place. In future this could help understand how to target therapeutic cells to specific places in the body, for targeted treatments.

More than 100 new gut bacteria discovered in human microbiome

More than 100 new gut bacteria discovered in human microbiome

More than 100 new gut bacteria discovered in human microbiome

Study will help understand role of microbiome in health and disease

The new resource will allow scientists to detect which bacteria are present in the human gut, more accurately and faster than ever before. This will also provide the foundation to develop new ways of treating diseases such as gastrointestinal disorders, infections and immune conditions.

100 cancer organoid models developed by Sanger Institute scientists 

Organoids - the Sanger Institute is leading the UK effort

100 cancer organoid models developed by Sanger Institute scientists 

The organoids developed by the Sanger Institute lead the UK effort as part of the international Human Cancer Model Initiative (HCMI) and will soon be available for researchers, together with their associated genomic data

Organoids are a powerful new tool for cancer researchers. The cells, derived from patients tumours and grown in the lab, mirror the cellular complexity and architecture of an individual tumour. Having 100 organoids from patients with three types of cancer begins to reflect the huge diversity of tumours.

Genetic testing gives answers on developmental disorders during pregnancy

Genetic testing gives answers on developmental disorders during pregnancy

Genetic testing gives answers on developmental disorders during pregnancy

Researchers identified new diagnoses of known genetic disorders for 52 of the 610 pregnancies they genome sequenced

Genetic testing improves the diagnoses of abnormalities in developing babies that are picked up during ultrasound scans. Using genome sequencing, scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, University of Cambridge, University of Birmingham, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and their collaborators improved diagnoses of abnormalities detected by ultrasound by around 10 per cent.

Immune master regulator orchestrates responses to parasite infection

Immune master regulator orchestrates response to parasite infection. Image credit: Dave Goulding, Wellcome Sanger Institute

Immune master regulator orchestrates responses to parasite infection

Receptor IL-10R is vital to coordinating the body's immune response to whipworms, preventing uncontrolled infection and gut lining damage

Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and collaborators have revealed that the interleukin 10 receptor (IL-10R) is critical to prevent uncontrolled whipworm infection in mice and a damaging immune response in the gut.

GARFIELD classifies disease-relevant changes in the genome

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GARFIELD classifies disease-relevant changes in the genome

New approach reveals role of genomic changes in a disease, both within and outside genes

Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and EMBL’s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) have developed a new approach to understand the functional effects of genetic variations associated with a disease, even if they aren't located in a gene. Using this approach could help scientists uncover previously unknown mechanisms that control gene activity and determine whether or not cell work normally or, in the case of genetic diseases, the cells malfunction.

Huge step forward in decoding genomes of small species

Sanger Institute researchers, working with PacBio, have obtained a high-quality whole genome from just a single mosquito's DNA

Huge step forward in decoding genomes of small species

Scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and Pacific Biosciences use just ‘half a mosquito-worth’ of DNA to produce a whole, high quality, single mosquito's genome

The team were able to generate a high quality genome from just 100 nanograms of DNA. This advance could have positive potential for humans as well, for example in the future it could be possible to assemble the whole genetic code of a patient’s cancer, from a single biopsy.

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