News Archive - 2018

News Archive - 2018

Deadly malaria’s evolution revealed

Plasmodium falciparum is the only parasite from the Laverania family that has successfully adapted to transfer from gorillas to infect humans, and subsequently spread all over the world

Deadly malaria’s evolution revealed

Study shows Plasmodium falciparum emerged earlier than thought and gives clues to how deadly parasites arise

The evolutionary path of the deadliest human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, has been revealed for the first time. This parasite is a member of the Laverania parasite family that only infect the great apes including humans, chimpanzees and gorillas. Scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators estimate that Plasmodium falciparum emerged as a human-specific parasite species earlier than previously thought. The study in Nature Microbiology gives clues to how deadly parasites emerge.

Gonorrhoea surveillance study maps antibiotic resistance across Europe

The first European-wide genomic survey of gonorrhoea has mapped antibiotic resistance in this sexually transmitted disease throughout the continent

Gonorrhoea surveillance study maps antibiotic resistance across Europe

Genomic approach could help doctors monitor emerging resistance and prescribe most effective antibiotics in the future

Reported in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, the study has also established an open genomic database of gonorrhoea. The new resource will support real-time ongoing surveillance of gonorrhoea worldwide, which public health officials could use to monitor which strains of gonorrhoea are present globally and where new antibiotic resistance is emerging.

Sanger’s Head of Cancer, Ageing and Somatic Mutation Programme honoured by EMBO

Dr Peter Campbell becomes an elected member of the European Molecular Biology Organization

Sanger’s Head of Cancer, Ageing and Somatic Mutation Programme honoured by EMBO

Dr Peter Campbell becomes an elected member of the European Molecular Biology Organization

Today (14 May 2018) Dr Peter Campbell joins 61 fellow researchers from 24 countries in being elected to membership of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO). EMBO was created to promote excellence in molecular life sciences in Europe and each year recognises new members on the basis of scientific excellence.

Professor Nicole Soranzo and Dr David Adams elected to the Academy of Medical Sciences

Professor Nicole Soranzo and Dr David Adams have been elected to Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences

Professor Nicole Soranzo and Dr David Adams elected to the Academy of Medical Sciences

Sanger researchers focusing on human genetics and cancer are recognised with prestigious Fellowships

Wellcome Sanger Institute Group Leaders Professor Nicole Soranzo and Dr David Adams are two of 48 world-leading scientists being honoured by the Academy of Medical Sciences for their outstanding contribution to biomedical science. David and Nicole were chosen from 410 candidates to join more than 1,200 existing Fellows whose innovative research is advancing understanding of health and disease and is benefitting society.

Professor Dominic Kwiatkowski joins the Fellowship of the Royal Society

Professor Dominic Kwiatkowski elected to Fellowship of the Royal Society

Professor Dominic Kwiatkowski joins the Fellowship of the Royal Society

Head of Sanger’s Parasites and Microbes Programme elected Fellow of the Royal Society

Today's announcement (9 May 2018) recognises Professor Dominic Kwiatkowski’s pioneering work on malaria, and particularly the use of genomic epidemiology to understand the evolutionary arms race that is going on between human, parasite and mosquito populations in Africa and other tropical regions of the world.

Machine learning flags emerging pathogens

A new machine learning tool that can detect whether emerging strains of the bacterium, Salmonella are more likely to cause dangerous bloodstream infections rather than food poisoning has been developed

Machine learning flags emerging pathogens

A new machine learning tool could be useful for flagging dangerous bacteria before they cause an outbreak, from hospital wards to a global scale

A new machine learning tool that can detect whether emerging strains of the bacterium, Salmonella are more likely to cause dangerous bloodstream infections rather than food poisoning has been developed. The tool, created by a scientist at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and her collaborators at the University of Otago, New Zealand and the Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research, a site of the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Germany, greatly speeds up the process for identifying the genetic changes underlying new invasive types of Salmonella that are of public health concern

Leukaemia: protective role of Y chromosone gene discovered

Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML): protective role of a gene carried on the Y chromosome discovered

Leukaemia: protective role of Y chromosone gene discovered

Researchers have found that UTY, a gene on the Y chromosome, protects male mice lacking the tumour-suppressing UTX gene on the X chromosome from developing acute myeloid leukaemia

Scientists have discovered the first leukaemia protective gene that is specific to the male-only Y chromosome. Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge found that this Y-chromosome gene protects against the development of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) and other cancers.

Deadliest human malaria parasite reveals the genomic chinks in its armour

Malaria infected red blood cell

Deadliest human malaria parasite reveals the genomic chinks in its armour

Study reveals essential genes for Plasmodium falciparum to identify new drug targets

For the first time, scientists have revealed the essential genes for the most deadly human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the University of South Florida (USF) created new genomic techniques to analyse every gene in the parasite and determine which ones are indispensable.

Celgene joins Open Targets Initiative

Celgene joins Wellcome Sanger Institute's Open Targets Initiative

Celgene joins Open Targets Initiative

Celgene will expand the Initiative's collective efforts to transform drug discovery through the systematic identification and prioritisation of drug targets

Celgene is a global biopharmaceutical company with expertise in the discovery, development and commercialisation of innovative therapies for patients with cancer, immune-inflammatory and other unmet medical needs, which will enhance the offerings of the current Open Targets collaborators GSK, Biogen, Takeda, the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI).

Emma Davenport and Hilary Martin to lead research groups in the Human Genetics Programme

Emma Davenport and Hilary Martin to lead research groups at Wellcome Sanger Institute

Emma Davenport and Hilary Martin to lead research groups in the Human Genetics Programme

The faculty appointments, starting in Autumn 2018, will help the Sanger Institute establish foundational knowledge of how variation in DNA contributes to health and disease

The Wellcome Sanger Institute is delighted to announce that it will be welcoming two new members of Faculty in September and October 2018: Hilary Martin and Emma Davenport. Both researchers have strong experience in studying the contributions of genetic variation to disease, or deciding whether or not a drug will be effective. Their work will help to lay the foundations of understanding needed for precision medicine – where the most effective treatments for individuals can be determined by reading the sequence of their genomes.

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