News Archive - 2018

News Archive - 2018

Wellcome Sanger Institute at 25: how the genomic revolution is changing medicine

Wellcome Sanger Institute at 25: how the genomic revolution is changing medicine

Wellcome Sanger Institute at 25: how the genomic revolution is changing medicine

Leaps forward in knowledge have allowed scientists and doctors to start to bringing advances out of the lab and into the clinic to directly benefit patients

This October, the Wellcome Sanger Institute, one of the world’s leading centres of genomic research, celebrates 25 years of research and discovery through genome sequencing. In the same week, the NHS will become the first health service in the world to routinely offer genomic medicine as part of patient care.

LifeLab - Free events highlight discovery on your doorstep

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LifeLab - Free events highlight discovery on your doorstep

Events include pop-up labs, a puppet show with a difference, story-telling and retro gameshows

LifeLab has launched an exciting programme of events for Friday 28th and Saturday 29th September, to transform parts of Cambridge and Peterborough into centres of discovery and opportunity for the weekend. Most of the events in shopping centres , cafes and public spaces are free, with a range of activities to inspire all ages and interests.

Family tree of blood production reveals hundreds of thousands of stem cells

Single blood stem cell growing into a colony over 10 days. Image credit: Craig McDonald, Kent Lab

Family tree of blood production reveals hundreds of thousands of stem cells

Humans have 10 times more blood-making stem cells than previously thought

Adult humans have many more blood-creating stem cells in their bone marrow than previously thought, ranging between 50,000 and 200,000 stem cells. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and Wellcome – MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute developed a new approach for studying stem cells, based on methods used in ecology.

Regulator protein key to malaria parasite’s lifecycle

Discovery of AP2-G master switch could help find new ways to prevent malaria

Regulator protein key to malaria parasite’s lifecycle

Discovery of AP2-G master switch could help find new ways to prevent malaria

New experimental research by the University of Glasgow and the Wellcome Sanger Institute published in Nature Microbiology, demonstrates that a regulator protein, AP2-G, may hold the key to finding new approaches to prevent malaria.

Newly sequenced golden eagle genome will help its conservation

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Newly sequenced golden eagle genome will help its conservation

The golden eagle is the first of 25 UK species to be completed as part of the 25 Genomes Project

Conservation and monitoring efforts for the golden eagle will benefit from the newly-completed golden eagle genome sequence – the first of 25 species’ genomes sequenced by the Wellcome Sanger Institute, in collaboration with the University of Edinburgh. The golden eagle genome, released today (31 August), will help scientists and conservationists understand the diversity and viability of the species worldwide.

Children’s bone cancers could remain hidden for years before diagnosis

Ewing sarcoma image

Children’s bone cancers could remain hidden for years before diagnosis

Complex genetic rearrangements found in many Ewing sarcomas could help inform diagnosis and treatment

Researchers have discovered that some childhood bone cancers start growing years before they are currently diagnosed, and found many contained large-scale genetic rearrangements. This study will help unravel the causes of childhood cancers and could help to find ways to diagnose and treat these cancers earlier in the future.

Kidney cancer's developmental source revealed

Section of human kidney cortex - Researchers have discovered that children’s Wilms’ cancer cells have the same characteristics as a specific normal developing kidney cell, indicating that these kidney cells failed to develop properly in the womb

Kidney cancer's developmental source revealed

Study reveals that kidney cancers may arise from cells that haven't fully developed, offering a new target for treatment

Using single-cell RNA sequencing, the researchers discovered that children’s Wilms’ cancer cells have the same characteristics as a specific normal developing kidney cell, indicating that these kidney cells failed to develop properly in the womb.

Human Cell Atlas gets a boost with first funding from Wellcome

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Human Cell Atlas gets a boost with first funding from Wellcome

Injection of £7 million will help to create a cellular 'Google map' of the human body, which could revolutionise health and disease

The funding announced today (9 August) is the first major financial commitment in the UK to power the collection, sequencing, and analysis of cells. It will build on the UK’s long history of excellence in genomics and biomedical research, aided by strong links between research groups, tissue biobanks, and hospitals.

Explore nature's genetic secrets in new exhibition

Curious Nature exhibition at the Wellcome Genome Campus. Image Credit: Alex Cagan, Genome Research Limited

Explore nature's genetic secrets in new exhibition

Curious Nature exhibition explores the Wellcome Sanger Institute’s 25th anniversary project to sequence the genomes of 25 UK species for the first time.

Discover how genome sequencing is helping us uncover much more about the world around us in Wellcome Genome Campus’ new family-friendly exhibition, Curious Nature. The exhibition is part of Open Saturdays at the Campus, which are free to attend but booking is required.

Gene study pinpoints superbug link between people and animals

Gene study pinpoints superbug link between people and animals

Gene study pinpoints superbug link between people and animals

The research could help with designing more effective ways to prevent bacterial transfer in farms and better antibiotic practices

The findings, published today (23 July) in Nature Ecology & Evolution, reveal fresh insights into how new disease-causing strains of the bacteria – called Staphylococcus aureus – emerge.

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