News Archive

News Archive

Machine learning flags emerging pathogens

A new machine learning tool that can detect whether emerging strains of the bacterium, Salmonella are more likely to cause dangerous bloodstream infections rather than food poisoning has been developed

Machine learning flags emerging pathogens

A new machine learning tool could be useful for flagging dangerous bacteria before they cause an outbreak, from hospital wards to a global scale

A new machine learning tool that can detect whether emerging strains of the bacterium, Salmonella are more likely to cause dangerous bloodstream infections rather than food poisoning has been developed. The tool, created by a scientist at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and her collaborators at the University of Otago, New Zealand and the Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research, a site of the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Germany, greatly speeds up the process for identifying the genetic changes underlying new invasive types of Salmonella that are of public health concern

Leukaemia: protective role of Y chromosone gene discovered

Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML): protective role of a gene carried on the Y chromosome discovered

Leukaemia: protective role of Y chromosone gene discovered

Researchers have found that UTY, a gene on the Y chromosome, protects male mice lacking the tumour-suppressing UTX gene on the X chromosome from developing acute myeloid leukaemia

Scientists have discovered the first leukaemia protective gene that is specific to the male-only Y chromosome. Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge found that this Y-chromosome gene protects against the development of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) and other cancers.

Deadliest human malaria parasite reveals the genomic chinks in its armour

Malaria infected red blood cell

Deadliest human malaria parasite reveals the genomic chinks in its armour

Study reveals essential genes for Plasmodium falciparum to identify new drug targets

For the first time, scientists have revealed the essential genes for the most deadly human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the University of South Florida (USF) created new genomic techniques to analyse every gene in the parasite and determine which ones are indispensable.

Celgene joins Open Targets Initiative

Celgene joins Wellcome Sanger Institute's Open Targets Initiative

Celgene joins Open Targets Initiative

Celgene will expand the Initiative's collective efforts to transform drug discovery through the systematic identification and prioritisation of drug targets

Celgene is a global biopharmaceutical company with expertise in the discovery, development and commercialisation of innovative therapies for patients with cancer, immune-inflammatory and other unmet medical needs, which will enhance the offerings of the current Open Targets collaborators GSK, Biogen, Takeda, the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI).

Emma Davenport and Hilary Martin to lead research groups in the Human Genetics Programme

Emma Davenport and Hilary Martin to lead research groups at Wellcome Sanger Institute

Emma Davenport and Hilary Martin to lead research groups in the Human Genetics Programme

The faculty appointments, starting in Autumn 2018, will help the Sanger Institute establish foundational knowledge of how variation in DNA contributes to health and disease

The Wellcome Sanger Institute is delighted to announce that it will be welcoming two new members of Faculty in September and October 2018: Hilary Martin and Emma Davenport. Both researchers have strong experience in studying the contributions of genetic variation to disease, or deciding whether or not a drug will be effective. Their work will help to lay the foundations of understanding needed for precision medicine – where the most effective treatments for individuals can be determined by reading the sequence of their genomes.

New Sanger Institute Human Cell Atlas projects funded by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative DAF, an advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation

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New Sanger Institute Human Cell Atlas projects funded by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative DAF, an advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation

Projects will build computational tools to support the global Human Cell Atlas initiative to map every cell type in the body

Martin Hemberg and Kerstin Meyer are recipients of three of the latest grants from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative DAF, an advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation. These projects will help to build tools and technologies to support the Human Cell Atlas, a global effort to map every type of cell in the healthy human body.

Advance access to data: Researchers post genetic profiles of human and mouse cells on Human Cell Atlas online portal before publication

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Advance access to data: Researchers post genetic profiles of human and mouse cells on Human Cell Atlas online portal before publication

Prior to publishing their results, researchers compile and make raw data openly accessible on the preview version of the HCA Data Coordination Platform

Data sets of human and mouse cells have been made openly accessible on a preview site for the Human Cell Atlas initiative. The data sets are a valuable resource for the broader scientific community as they can can reveal basic biology, provide a reference for studying disease, and allow computational biologists to test new analysis tools.

First seeds of kidney cancer sown in adolescence

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First seeds of kidney cancer sown in adolescence

Insights from this study present an opportunity to develop approaches for early detection and early intervention in kidney cancer

The earliest critical genetic changes that can lead to kidney cancer have been mapped by scientists. The first key genetic change occurs in childhood or adolescence, and the resulting cells follow a consistent path to progress into kidney cancer four or five decades later, scientists have found.

Single cell technology and organoids reveal every bowel tumour and bowel cancer cell have unique genetic fingerprints

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Single cell technology and organoids reveal every bowel tumour and bowel cancer cell have unique genetic fingerprints

Study could help researchers target cancer-specific processes for cancer prevention or to develop treatments

New research on bowel cancer has shown that every tumour is different, and that every cell within the tumour is genetically unique. In the first study of its kind, researchers used the latest single cell and organoid technologies to understand the mutational processes of the disease. This study could help researchers target cancer-specific processes for prevention or treatment.

20 year-old mystery of malaria vaccine target solved

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20 year-old mystery of malaria vaccine target solved

Discovery of human receptor for TRAP protein could help improve development of an effective malaria vaccine

A long-standing mystery of how the high-priority malaria vaccine target TRAP interacts with human host cells has been solved. Wellcome Sanger Institute scientists have discovered a receptor protein on the surface of human cells that the malarial TRAP protein interacts with as it navigates through the body. This could help improve the development of an effective malaria vaccine.

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