News Archive

News Archive

Human Cell Atlas takes first steps towards understanding human development: First 250 thousand developmental cells sequenced

Retinal cells - Human Developmental Cell Atlas

Human Cell Atlas takes first steps towards understanding human development: First 250 thousand developmental cells sequenced

The Human Developmental Cell Atlas programme will create genomic reference maps of all the cells that are important for human development

The Human Developmental Cell Atlas (HDCA) is one part of the ambitious Human Cell Atlas (HCA), a global consortium that aims to transform biological research and medicine by mapping every cell in the human body. Progress on the HDCA and other aspects of the Human Cell Atlas will be discussed at the international HCA meeting at the Wellcome Genome Campus, Cambridge on 8 March 2018

Supporters of women in science shine

Winners of the 2018 Women in Science Awards on the Wellcome Genome Campus

Supporters of women in science shine

Role models from across the Wellcome Genome Campus have been recognised for their work in promoting gender equality

On International Women’s Day (8 March) the Wellcome Genome Campus celebrates members of staff who lead the way in supporting women in science with the presentation of the Sex in Science Best Practice Awards. Congratulations to the winners of the fourth annual awards: Elspeth Bruford from EMBL-EBI, Genny Kiff of the Wellcome Sanger Institute and Treasa Creavin from Connecting Science’s Advanced Courses and Scientific Conferences.

Genomic Expressions: Express yourself at new exhibition

Genomic Expressions Open Saturdays on the Wellcome Genome Campus - Metastasis by Alex Cagan

Genomic Expressions: Express yourself at new exhibition

The exhibition is part of the Wellcome Genome Campus’ Open Saturdays programme dates include 24 March, 21 April, 19 May and 16 June 2018

Genomic Expressions is a new exhibition at the Wellcome Genome Campus that displays the creative efforts of the people who work across the campus, reflecting what genomics means to them – from vivid paintings and sculptures to baked goods and audio experiences. The exhibition is part of the Wellcome Genome Campus’ Open Saturdays programme, which are free to attend but booking is required.

Genetic roots of major depression: three new genetic risk markers discovered

Researchers have discovered three regions of the genome that are significantly associated with major depressive disorder in people with no history of adversity

Genetic roots of major depression: three new genetic risk markers discovered

New research taking people's life histories into account finds new genetic regions that may increase the risk of major depression

Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University, European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) and Wellcome Sanger Institute have found that the contribution of genetic variations to depression may differ between people who have experienced serious adversities in their life and those who haven’t. By carrying out a genome-wide association study that took into account whether or not a person has faced a major adversity in their life, the scientists were able to identify contributing molecular mechanisms that not previously been associated with depression.

Missing link found between pathways involved in cell development

Human embryonic stem cells differentiated into the neuroectoderm germ layer. Normal cells (control, on the right) compared with cells whose SMAD2/3 mechanism has been impaired by preventing expression of the WTAP protein (on the left)

Missing link found between pathways involved in cell development

The new mechanism could be essential for processes that need a rapid response - such as organ repair, immune response or cancer growth

A new mechanism that coordinates human development in response to signals from outside the cell has been discovered by researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the Wellcome - MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute. Reported in Nature, the study revealed that the SMAD2 and SMAD3 proteins (SMAD2/3) link and coordinate many different pathways in the cell that were previously believed to be separate.

UK Bioindustry Association (BIA) launches new Genomics Advisory Committee at annual Committee Summit

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UK Bioindustry Association (BIA) launches new Genomics Advisory Committee at annual Committee Summit

The UK Bioindustry Association (BIA) launched its newest Advisory Committee, focused on the issue of genomics, chaired by Adrian Ibrahim from the Wellcome Sanger Institute's Innovations team.

The Committee will act as a leadership platform for sharing and discussing issues of common concern between genomic businesses and will provide expert advice on important issues such as the use of data and embedding genomic medicine in the NHS.

Typhoid outbreak: genetic cause of extensive drug resistance found

Clean water provision in Sindh, Pakistan. Currently there is a spreading outbreak of extensively drug resistant (XDR) typhoid in the region

Typhoid outbreak: genetic cause of extensive drug resistance found

The results suggest that treatment options for typhoid treatment are running out and preventative strategies are needed

The genetic cause behind a strain of typhoid’s resistance to five classes of antibiotics has been uncovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators at Public Health England and Aga Khan University, Pakistan. This study shows the typhoid strain causing the outbreak acquired an additional piece of DNA to become resistant to multiple antibiotics, including a third-generation antibiotic.

Major funding for Cambridge to transform health through data science

HDRUK

Major funding for Cambridge to transform health through data science

Cambridge is amongst six sites across the UK to be awarded a total of £30M funding by Health Data Research UK, to address challenging healthcare issues through use of data science.

Each of the six sites already work in close partnership with NHS bodies and the public to translate research findings into benefits for patients and populations. From April this year, the sites will work collaboratively as foundation partners in Health Data Research UK to make game-changing improvements in people’s health by harnessing data science at scale across the UK.

Is food love-hate coded in your DNA?

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Is food love-hate coded in your DNA?

This Valentine’s special is the first of an exciting new programme of monthly Café Sci events in Cambridge

Can your DNA say if you love or hate Marmite, or prefer a Malbec over Merlot? Genetic testing is hitting the mainstream, but what can your DNA actually reveal about you? Join us on Valentine’s night for the first event of a lively new series of Café Sci to find out more about the real science truths, and discuss how you think genetic data should be used.

Multidrug resistant malaria spread under the radar for years in Cambodia

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Multidrug resistant malaria spread under the radar for years in Cambodia

Study suggests that ongoing genomic surveillance is vital to inform malaria control strategies

The most comprehensive genetic study of malaria parasites in Southeast Asia has shown that resistance to antimalarial drugs was under-reported for years in Cambodia. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators have shown that the parasites developed multidrug resistance to first-line treatments extremely rapidly.

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