News Archive

News Archive

Human kidney map charts our growing immune defence

Section of human kidney cortex

Human kidney map charts our growing immune defence

New cell atlas reveals immune cells present in zones of human kidney

The first cell atlas of the human kidney’s immune system has been created after scientists mapped nearly 70,000 individual kidney cells from early life and adults. Researchers generated the atlas and used it to map immune cells in the kidney. This shows for the first time how the kidney’s immune system develops during early life, and strengthens after birth and as we mature into adults, with implications for tackling kidney disease and transplant rejection

Scientists hone in on DNA differences behind immune diseases

Scientists hone in on DNA differences behind immune diseases. Image credit: Shutterstock

Scientists hone in on DNA differences behind immune diseases

Search could help find drug targets for developing new treatments

Scientists are one step closer to discovering the causes of immune diseases such as asthma, multiple sclerosis and arthritis. Research from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, GSK and Biogen, under the Open Targets initiative, has shown that thousands of differences in DNA between individuals, associated with immune diseases, are linked with the switching-on of a specific subtype of immune cells.

Salmonella responsible for bloodstream infections in central Africa resistant to nearly all drugs

Salmonella responsible for bloodstream infections in central Africa resistant to nearly all drugs

Salmonella responsible for bloodstream infections in central Africa resistant to nearly all drugs

Strain of dangerous pathogen shown to have developed resistance to last-line-of-defence drug

The first extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of Salmonella Typhimurium, a pathogen which is responsible for millions of bloodstream infections per year in sub-Saharan Africa, have been identified in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Drug-resistance has increased in successive groups of S. Typhimurium over time. These new strains are resistant to all but one of the commonly available drugs in the DRC, with one sample showing reduced susceptibility to this final antibiotic.

Babies' gut bacteria affected by delivery method, Baby Biome project shows

Babies' gut bacteria affected by delivery method, baby biome project shows. Image credit: PublicDomainPictures

Babies' gut bacteria affected by delivery method, Baby Biome project shows

Vaginal delivery promotes mother's gut bacteria in baby's gut

This largest ever study of neonatal microbiomes revealed that the microbiome of vaginally delivered newborns did not come from the mother’s vaginal bacteria, but from the mother’s gut. In contrast, babies born via caesarean section tended to have more bacteria associated with hospital environments in their guts.

500,000 whole human genomes will be a game-changer for research into human diseases

ukbiobank_home.jpg

500,000 whole human genomes will be a game-changer for research into human diseases

Following on from a successful pilot at the Sanger Institute, we are leading a project to sequence the genomes of all UK Biobank volunteers to power the next wave of genetic and health research

In a major advance for public health and for the UK’s global leadership in genomics, a £200m project involving the government, charity, researchers and four leading pharmaceutical companies, was announced today (11 September). The Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) project will become a game-changing resource accessible to the global scientific community to understand, diagnose, treat and prevent life-changing diseases such as cancer and dementia.

Brown trout genome will help explain species' genetic superpowers

Brown trout (Salmo trutta) are one of the most genetically diverse vertebrates, it could comprise up to 50 distinct species. The newly-sequenced brown trout genome will allow scientists and conservationists to better understand the fish's genetic roots

Brown trout genome will help explain species' genetic superpowers

Eagerly awaited reference genome will allow conservationists to understand how the fish adapts to marine and freshwater environments

Better conservation and management of fish stocks is on the horizon, after the completion of the brown trout reference genome by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. The genome will help settle a longstanding debate about whether the physically-varied brown trout is actually a single species or several, and give insights into their ability to quickly adapt to multiple environments.

LifeLab 2019 – discovery on your doorstep with an exciting programme of free events and activities

LifeLab in action

LifeLab 2019 – discovery on your doorstep with an exciting programme of free events and activities

LifeLab has launched an exciting programme of events for Friday 27 and Saturday 28 September 2019, transforming parts of Cambridge, Peterborough and Ely into discovery zones for the weekend

LifeLab is led by Wellcome Genome Campus Public Engagement, and brings together five of the region’s leading life science research organisations: the Wellcome Sanger Institute, EMBL’s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), the Babraham Institute, the University of Cambridge and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology.

Decoding first of 60,000 British species as Darwin Tree of Life branches out

Speckled wood butterfly

Decoding first of 60,000 British species as Darwin Tree of Life branches out

The mission to map the genetic code of all known British species is underway

A mission to map the genetic code of 60,000 British species is well underway as 150 species are in the process of having their DNA extracted and their entire genetic code read and assembled. Sanger Institute researchers and their collaborators within the Darwin Tree of Life project plan to sequence the genomes of 2,000 British species over the next two years, and then scale up to complete 60,000 species’ genomes with the next 10 years, Professor Mark Blaxter announced this week at a press briefing in New York.

Map of malaria behaviour set to revolutionise research

Malaria Cell Atlas logo. Image credit: Alex Cagan

Map of malaria behaviour set to revolutionise research

The Malaria Cell Atlas gives the highest resolution view of malaria parasite gene expression to date and monitors how individual parasites change as they develop in both the mosquito and human host

The first detailed map of individual malaria parasite behaviour across each stage of its complicated life cycle has been created by scientists. Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators used advanced single-cell technology to isolate individual parasites and measure their gene activity. The result is the Malaria Cell Atlas

Malaria control success in Africa at risk from spread of multi-drug resistance

Effective case management remains one of the cornerstones of malaria prevention and control. Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are used for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Credit: William Brieger, Jhpiego

Malaria control success in Africa at risk from spread of multi-drug resistance

Regional populations of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in Africa are sharing genetic material in all directions – including genes that can confer resistance to anti-malarial drugs

In the first continent-wide genomic study of malaria parasites in Africa, scientists have uncovered the genetic features of Plasmodium falciparum that inhabit different regions of the continent, including the genetic factors that confer resistance to anti-malarial drugs. This sheds new light on the way that drug resistance is emerging in different locations and moving by various routes across Africa, putting previous success in controlling malaria at risk.

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