News Archive

News Archive

First 'non-gene' mutations behind neurodevelopmental disorders discovered

First 'non-gene' mutations behind neurodevelopmental disorders found, as part of the Deciphering Developmental Disorders (DDD) project

First 'non-gene' mutations behind neurodevelopmental disorders discovered

The study is a positive step towards providing an explanation for children with undiagnosed neurodevelopmental disorders

In the largest study of its kind, genetic changes causing neurodevelopmental disorders have been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators in the NHS Regional Genetics services. The study of almost 8,000 families, published in Nature, found for the first time that mutations outside of genes can cause rare developmental disorders of the central nervous system.

Switch discovered to convert blood vessels to blood stem cells during embryonic development

Cross section of a small blood vessel containing numerous red blood cells and a white blood cell

Switch discovered to convert blood vessels to blood stem cells during embryonic development

Findings could aid research into creating new blood cells for transplants and understanding cancer metastasis

A switch has been discovered that instructs blood vessel cells to become blood stem cells during embryonic development in mice. Reported in eLife, the findings from researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute in Cambridge and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Rome could aid research into creating new blood cells for transplants and for understanding cancer metastasis.

New osteoarthritis genes discovered

Ostoarthritis

New osteoarthritis genes discovered

The results could open the door to new targeted therapies for this debilitating disease in the future

In the largest study of its kind, nine novel genes for osteoarthritis have been discovered by scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Results of the study, published today (19 March) in Nature Genetics, could open the door to new targeted therapies for this debilitating disease in the future.

Placenta defects critical factor in prenatal deaths

Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders consortium - DMDD - shows that placental defects can be caused by damaged genes

Placenta defects critical factor in prenatal deaths

Research in mice reveal genes whose roles appear to be vital in developing healthy placentas

Writing in the journal Nature, the members of the Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) consortium studied 103 genetic mutations in mice that cause embryos to die before birth. The results showed that the majority, almost 70 per cent, cause defects in the placenta.

John Sulston (1942-2018) – Founding Director of the Wellcome Sanger Institute

Professor Sir John Sulston, Nobel Prize winner and Founding Director of the Wellcome Sanger Institute, who passed away on Tuesday 6 March 2018

John Sulston (1942-2018) – Founding Director of the Wellcome Sanger Institute

We are deeply saddened to announce the death of Professor Sir John Sulston, Founding Director of the Wellcome Sanger Institute

Throughout his career, Sir John pushed scientific boundaries and was a strong believer that science is a public good. His far-sighted vision for genomics means he leaves behind a global field firmly founded on the principles of open access and a generation of scientists influenced by his actions and values.

Human Cell Atlas takes first steps towards understanding human development: First 250 thousand developmental cells sequenced

Retinal cells - Human Developmental Cell Atlas

Human Cell Atlas takes first steps towards understanding human development: First 250 thousand developmental cells sequenced

The Human Developmental Cell Atlas programme will create genomic reference maps of all the cells that are important for human development

The Human Developmental Cell Atlas (HDCA) is one part of the ambitious Human Cell Atlas (HCA), a global consortium that aims to transform biological research and medicine by mapping every cell in the human body. Progress on the HDCA and other aspects of the Human Cell Atlas will be discussed at the international HCA meeting at the Wellcome Genome Campus, Cambridge on 8 March 2018

Supporters of women in science shine

Winners of the 2018 Women in Science Awards on the Wellcome Genome Campus

Supporters of women in science shine

Role models from across the Wellcome Genome Campus have been recognised for their work in promoting gender equality

On International Women’s Day (8 March) the Wellcome Genome Campus celebrates members of staff who lead the way in supporting women in science with the presentation of the Sex in Science Best Practice Awards. Congratulations to the winners of the fourth annual awards: Elspeth Bruford from EMBL-EBI, Genny Kiff of the Wellcome Sanger Institute and Treasa Creavin from Connecting Science’s Advanced Courses and Scientific Conferences.

Genomic Expressions: Express yourself at new exhibition

Genomic Expressions Open Saturdays on the Wellcome Genome Campus - Metastasis by Alex Cagan

Genomic Expressions: Express yourself at new exhibition

The exhibition is part of the Wellcome Genome Campus’ Open Saturdays programme dates include 24 March, 21 April, 19 May and 16 June 2018

Genomic Expressions is a new exhibition at the Wellcome Genome Campus that displays the creative efforts of the people who work across the campus, reflecting what genomics means to them – from vivid paintings and sculptures to baked goods and audio experiences. The exhibition is part of the Wellcome Genome Campus’ Open Saturdays programme, which are free to attend but booking is required.

Genetic roots of major depression: three new genetic risk markers discovered

Researchers have discovered three regions of the genome that are significantly associated with major depressive disorder in people with no history of adversity

Genetic roots of major depression: three new genetic risk markers discovered

New research taking people's life histories into account finds new genetic regions that may increase the risk of major depression

Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University, European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) and Wellcome Sanger Institute have found that the contribution of genetic variations to depression may differ between people who have experienced serious adversities in their life and those who haven’t. By carrying out a genome-wide association study that took into account whether or not a person has faced a major adversity in their life, the scientists were able to identify contributing molecular mechanisms that not previously been associated with depression.

Missing link found between pathways involved in cell development

Human embryonic stem cells differentiated into the neuroectoderm germ layer. Normal cells (control, on the right) compared with cells whose SMAD2/3 mechanism has been impaired by preventing expression of the WTAP protein (on the left)

Missing link found between pathways involved in cell development

The new mechanism could be essential for processes that need a rapid response - such as organ repair, immune response or cancer growth

A new mechanism that coordinates human development in response to signals from outside the cell has been discovered by researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the Wellcome - MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute. Reported in Nature, the study revealed that the SMAD2 and SMAD3 proteins (SMAD2/3) link and coordinate many different pathways in the cell that were previously believed to be separate.

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