News Archive

News Archive

Major mutation pattern in cancer occurs in bursts

Major mutation pattern in cancer occurs in bursts

Major mutation pattern in cancer occurs in bursts

New resource could help understand origins of cancer

Researchers have created a huge resource for investigating the biological mechanisms that cause cancer. Scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators identified the patterns of DNA damage - mutational fingerprints that represent the origins of cancer - present in over a thousand human cancer cell lines. They revealed that a major mutation pattern found in human cancer, occurred in bursts in cancer cell lines. Understanding these mutational processes could help research towards cancer prevention and treatment.

Cambridge heart research boosted by £6 million British Heart Foundation Research Excellence Award

Cambridge heart research boosted by £6 million British Heart Foundation Research Excellence Award

Cambridge heart research boosted by £6 million British Heart Foundation Research Excellence Award

Funding will allow Sanger Institute researchers and collaborators to apply cutting-edge genomics to help develop new heart disease diagnostics and treatments

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) has announced it will double its funding into world-leading heart disease research at the University of Cambridge’s BHF Centre of Research Excellence. The charity has awarded Cambridge a £6 million Research Excellence Award, so that it can expand and accelerate its pioneering work at the centre over the next five years.

Roser Vento-Tormo leads single-cell research team at the Sanger Institute

Vento-Tormo Group (VenTo group)

Roser Vento-Tormo leads single-cell research team at the Sanger Institute

The new group will identify the cells involved in the human female reproductive system, how they work, organise and communicate with each other to understand infertility, pre-eclampsia, miscarriage, placental defects and cancer

The Wellcome Sanger Institute is delighted that Roser Vento-Tormo has become its latest member of Faculty in March 2018. Her research team will boost the work of the Cellular Genetics programme as it explores the cellular makeup of, and interactions between, the individual cells that make up a human body.

Improving global surveillance of antibiotic resistance

Improving global surveillance of antibiotic resistance

Improving global surveillance of antibiotic resistance

A WHO Technical Note has been published that will enable health authorities to make informed choices on the most appropriate molecular tests in order to achieve a clearer picture of antimicrobial resistance globally

The WHO Technical Note details how molecular diagnostic tests using DNA or proteins can give reliable data that can complement current methods. The Technical Note considers three different laboratory contexts, each with different levels of capacities for molecular AMR testing: those with no prior experience in molecular AMR surveillance; newly established national reference laboratories (NRLs); and fully established NRLs with experience in molecular AMR surveillance.

Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development

Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development

Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development

By studying the genetic activity of 116,312 single cells from 6.5 to 8.5 days after fertilisation, researchers have determined the molecular blueprint for mouse embryonic development

A pioneering group of biologists, physicists and mathematical modellers in Cambridge have studied the genetic activity of over 100,000 embryonic cells to establish the molecular blueprint of mouse early embryo development. This new research provides fundamentally important information on how mammalian embryos develop during gastrulation, a key stage of development, and paves the way for new understanding of the earliest stages of life.

Cancer comparison across species highlights new drug target

Cancer comparison across species highlights new drug targets

Cancer comparison across species highlights new drug target

Scientists discover key genes for mucosal melanoma in humans, dogs and horses that help prioritise targets for new cancer therapies

The results, reported in Nature Communications, give insights into how cancer evolves across the tree of life and could guide the development of new therapies.

Almost 2,000 unknown bacteria discovered in the human gut

Almost 2,000 unknown bacteria discovered in the human gut

Almost 2,000 unknown bacteria discovered in the human gut

Researchers identify novel gut bacteria species and call for more data from beyond Europe and North America

Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and EMBL’s European Bioinformatics Institute have identified almost 2,000 bacterial species living in the human gut. These species are yet to be cultured in the lab. The team used a range of computational methods to analyse samples from individuals worldwide.

Sanger Institute steps up commitment to Equality, Diversity and Inclusion in Science

Equality Diversity and Inclusion in Science group

Sanger Institute steps up commitment to Equality, Diversity and Inclusion in Science

The Institute has joined a new coalition to remove biases in all aspects of life science research, including staff, experiment design, research subjects and study goals

Building on its ongoing work with Athena SWAN to address equality imbalances, the Institute is seeking to further address the wider issues of equality and diversity that can affect both the makeup of its scientific staff and the ability of its scientific samples to represent a diversity of ethnicities and gender.

Study reveals how immune cells target different tissues

Study reveals how immune cells target different tissues. Image credit: Peter Lane and Fiona McConnell, Wellcome Images

Study reveals how immune cells target different tissues

Tissue-specific receptors and adaptations enable localisation of T regulatory cells

For the first time, researchers have revealed the different molecular identities of important immune cells, called T regulatory cells, in peripheral non-lymphoid tissues like skin and colon. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and collaborators revealed that T regulatory cells have tissue-specific receptors and other adaptations, allowing them to move to the correct place. In future this could help understand how to target therapeutic cells to specific places in the body, for targeted treatments.

More than 100 new gut bacteria discovered in human microbiome

More than 100 new gut bacteria discovered in human microbiome

More than 100 new gut bacteria discovered in human microbiome

Study will help understand role of microbiome in health and disease

The new resource will allow scientists to detect which bacteria are present in the human gut, more accurately and faster than ever before. This will also provide the foundation to develop new ways of treating diseases such as gastrointestinal disorders, infections and immune conditions.

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