News Archive

News Archive

Rare genetic change provides clues to pancreas development

Rare genetic change provides clues to pancreas development

Rare genetic change provides clues to pancreas development

Understanding pancreas formation could aid research into type 1 diabetes treatments

Researchers have discovered a key clue into the development of the pancreas and brain by studying rare patients born without a pancreas. The study also identified an unexpected pathway in human pancreas development and confirmed this in mice.

Mice reveal 38 new genes involved in hearing loss

Mice reveal 38 new genes involved in hearing loss

Mice reveal 38 new genes involved in hearing loss

Molecular pathways revealed could identify potential drug targets for restoring hearing

Multiple new genes involved in hearing loss have been revealed in a large study of mouse mutants by researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, King’s College London, and colleagues. The new genes reveal the metabolic pathways and regulatory processes involved in hearing.

New cancer drug targets accelerate path to precision medicine

New cancer drug targets accelerate path to precision medicine. Image credit: Wellcome Sanger Institute, Genome Research Limited

New cancer drug targets accelerate path to precision medicine

Researchers discovered thousands of genes essential for cancer’s survival and ranked which ones show the most promise as drug targets for developing new treatments

The datasets produced in this new study lay the foundations for producing the Cancer Dependency Map, a detailed rulebook for the precision treatment of cancer.

Genetic code of WWI soldier's cholera mapped

British Expeditionary Force on the Western Front, 1914-1915. Image credit: Imperial War Museums (Wikimedia Commons)

Genetic code of WWI soldier's cholera mapped

The bacterium was isolated from a British soldier and stored for over 100 years before being revived and sequenced

The oldest publicly-available strain of the cholera-causing bacterial species, Vibrio cholerae, has had its genetic code read for the first time. The results show that this strain is a unique, non-toxigenic strain of V. cholerae that’s distantly related to the strains of bacteria causing cholera pandemics today and in the past.

Sanger Institute scientist wins 2020 Biochemical Society award

Sarah Teichmann wins 2020 Biochemical Society Award

Sanger Institute scientist wins 2020 Biochemical Society award

Head of Cellular Genetics Programme wins GlaxoSmithKline prize

The GlaxoSmithKline prize specifically celebrates the science of mid-career researchers who have taken a career break. As part of the award, Dr Teichmann will deliver a lecture at a Society event and will submit an article to one of the Society’s publications.

Darwin Tree of Life sets down roots

Participants at the March 2019 Darwin Tree of Life planning meeting

Darwin Tree of Life sets down roots

Planning for the Darwin Tree of Life Project is underway. We welcome Professor Mark Blaxter, from the University of Edinburgh, who will join the Sanger Institute and work alongside a scientific working group to establish the Institute’s new research programme, Tree of Life

The Darwin Tree of Life Project is just one of several initiatives across the globe working towards the ultimate goal of sequencing all complex life on Earth, in a venture known as the Earth BioGenome Project. The Sanger Institute will serve as a hub for sequencing and assembling the genomes of species from the British Isles. It will collaborate with partners from a breadth of UK-wide institutions, museums and universities to identify and collect species, and then to annotate and share the genomes.

Commitment to collaborate on using genomics for pathogen surveillance across Europe

Leaders from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control have signed a framework collaboration agreement to help enable and improve the use of genomic technologies in monitoring dangerous bacteria in the Europe

Commitment to collaborate on using genomics for pathogen surveillance across Europe

Combining the strengths of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the Centre for Genomic Pathogen Surveillance will improve the monitoring and tracking of infectious disease across Europe

Leaders from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control have signed a framework collaboration agreement, agreeing to work in partnership to help enable and improve the use of genomic technologies in monitoring dangerous bacteria in the European Union and European Economic Area.

Champions of equality and diversity celebrated

Winners of the Wellcome Genome Campus 2019 Best Practice for Supporting Equality and Diversity in Science Awards

Champions of equality and diversity celebrated

The winners were nominated by staff working at the Wellcome Genome Campus for their actions to advance equality, diversity and inclusion, which has positively impacted colleagues' working lives

For International Women's Day today (8 March) the Wellcome Genome Campus is celebrating its staff who lead the way in supporting equality and diversity in science. The day is being marked with its annual award for Best Practice for Supporting Equality and Diversity in Science.

Major mutation pattern in cancer occurs in bursts

Major mutation pattern in cancer occurs in bursts

Major mutation pattern in cancer occurs in bursts

New resource could help understand origins of cancer

Researchers have created a huge resource for investigating the biological mechanisms that cause cancer. Scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators identified the patterns of DNA damage - mutational fingerprints that represent the origins of cancer - present in over a thousand human cancer cell lines. They revealed that a major mutation pattern found in human cancer, occurred in bursts in cancer cell lines. Understanding these mutational processes could help research towards cancer prevention and treatment.

Cambridge heart research boosted by £6 million British Heart Foundation Research Excellence Award

Cambridge heart research boosted by £6 million British Heart Foundation Research Excellence Award

Cambridge heart research boosted by £6 million British Heart Foundation Research Excellence Award

Funding will allow Sanger Institute researchers and collaborators to apply cutting-edge genomics to help develop new heart disease diagnostics and treatments

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) has announced it will double its funding into world-leading heart disease research at the University of Cambridge’s BHF Centre of Research Excellence. The charity has awarded Cambridge a £6 million Research Excellence Award, so that it can expand and accelerate its pioneering work at the centre over the next five years.

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