News Archive - 2019

News Archive - 2019

Analysis of CRISPR-Cas9 datasets leads to largest genetic screen resource for cancer research

Cancer Dependency Map CRISPR screening: confocal fluorescence microscopy of CRISPR-generated knockout cells

Analysis of CRISPR-Cas9 datasets leads to largest genetic screen resource for cancer research

Study will help narrow down the list of targets for the next generation of cancer treatments

A comprehensive map of genes necessary for cancer survival is one step closer, following the validation of the two largest CRISPR-Cas9 genetic screens in 725 cancer models, across 25 different cancer types. Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard compared the consistency of the two datasets, independently verifying the methodology and findings.

Dr Konstantinos Tzelepis receives ASH–BSH Abstract Achievement Award for leukaemia target research

Dr Konstantinos Tzelepis receives ASH–BSH Abstract Achievement Award for leukaemia target research

Dr Konstantinos Tzelepis receives ASH–BSH Abstract Achievement Award for leukaemia target research

Award-winning abstract on METTL3 presented at American Society of Hematology meeting

Congratulations to Dr Konstantinos Tzelepis, Sir Henry Wellcome Fellow and Visiting Scientist at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, who has been awarded the ASH–BSH Abstract Achievement Award for his work on the leukaemia target, METTL3. This work was carried out in collaboration with the University of Cambridge, and with STORM Therapeutics, and revealed the work on targeting RNA modifying enzymes for cancer treatment  

Researchers identify over 140 genes linked to immune system regulation

Mouse_homepage.jpg

Researchers identify over 140 genes linked to immune system regulation

First extensive immune profiling of mice reveals a vast catalogue of genes that regulate the immune system and model human disease

Researchers have analysed over 500 genetically modified mouse lines to explore the effect of disrupting single genes on the immune system. The study by researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and Kings College London identified more than 140 genes involved in regulating the immune system and the response to infection with pathogens such as salmonella and the flu.

Appointments and changes to the Genome Research Limited Board

announcement.jpg

Appointments and changes to the Genome Research Limited Board

At the GRL Board meeting on 2 December 2019, David Willetts announced his intention to step down as Chair because of his extensive commitments across the academic and science sectors. Wellcome's Director, Jeremy Farrar, will take over the Chair of GRL Board from 1 January 2020.

The change in leadership comes as the Wellcome Genome Campus prepares to embark on an ambitious transformation project. In October, South Cambridgeshire District Council granted outline planning permission for a bold new vision to expand the campus, creating jobs, homes and additional facilities for the world-leading genome and data science at Hinxton.

Root of childhood kidney cancer discovered

Root of childhood kidney cancer discovered

Root of childhood kidney cancer discovered

Pre-cancerous signatures found in healthy tissue point the way towards new treatment options

A fundamental change in our understanding of the childhood kidney cancer Wilms’ tumour is on the horizon, after the discovery of its earliest genetic root by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. By comparing genome sequences from normal kidney tissue and tumours, the team identified patches of normal-looking kidney tissue that in fact carried DNA changes that cause Wilms’ tumour.

Researchers identify new possibilities for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

colorectal_home2.png

Researchers identify new possibilities for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

Two molecular pathways found to be integral to maintaining balance in the digestive system

A new study has revealed how two molecular pathways play an important role in maintaining balance in the human intestine, and how disruption of these pathways is linked to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The project was a collaboration between the University of Oxford, the Wellcome Sanger Institute, King’s College London and the University of Cambridge.

From childhood cancer to mapping human development: Pioneering scientist awarded 2019 Foulkes Foundation medal

Dr Muzlifa Haniffa photographed in the Super Resolution Imaging Lab, Newcastle University

From childhood cancer to mapping human development: Pioneering scientist awarded 2019 Foulkes Foundation medal

Congratulations to Professor Muzlifah Haniffa, who has been recognised for her work on the immune system and childhood cancer

Professor Muzlifah Haniffa from Newcastle University and the Wellcome Sanger Institute has won the 2019 Foulkes Foundation Medal for outstanding contributions to biomedical science.

Dr Sam Behjati wins Liddy Shriver Early Career Research Award

Dr Sam Behjati wins Liddy Shriver Early Career Research Award

Dr Sam Behjati wins Liddy Shriver Early Career Research Award

Congratulations to Sanger Institute cancer researcher, Dr Sam Behjati, who has been recognised for his work in sarcoma cancer genomics

Dr Sam Behjati has received this year’s Liddy Shriver Early Career Research Award, given by the Connective Tissue Oncology Society (CTOS). The Award highlights Dr Behjati’s internationally recognised, outstanding contributions as an early-career researcher working in the sarcoma field.

New malaria drug targets identified in liver stage of life cycle

Liver cells infected with Plasmodium berghei parasites

New malaria drug targets identified in liver stage of life cycle

Hope that new liver-stage drugs will help to counter the threat of antimicrobial resistance to current blood-stage medicines

New research into the different life stages of malaria parasites has identified promising areas for new drug targets aimed at disrupting the parasite’s invasion of the liver. Scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Bern and Umeå University discovered seven metabolic pathways that the parasite needs to infect the liver, where the parasite multiplies rapidly before invading the blood and causing malaria.

Ambitious project to map genomes of all life on British Isles funded by Wellcome

Ambitious project to map genomes of all life on British Isles funded by Wellcome

Ambitious project to map genomes of all life on British Isles funded by Wellcome

An unprecedented insight to the diverse range of species on the British Isles will be made possible by Wellcome funding to the Darwin Tree of Life Project

The £9.4m funding from Wellcome will support researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and nine other partner institutions involved in the Darwin Tree of Life project to launch the first phase of sequencing all the species on the British Isles. This will see the teams collect and barcode around 8000 key British species, and deliver high-quality genomes of 2000 species.

Pages