News Archive - 2019

News Archive - 2019

Diarrhoea-causing bacteria adapted to spread in hospitals

Diarrhoea-causing bacteria adapted to spread in hospitals

Diarrhoea-causing bacteria adapted to spread in hospitals

Gut-infecting bacterium Clostridium difficile is evolving into two separate species, with one group highly adapted to spread in hospitals

Scientists have discovered that the gut-infecting bacterium Clostridium difficile is evolving into two separate species, with one group highly adapted to spread in hospitals. Researchers identified genetic changes in the newly-emerging species that allow it to thrive on the Western sugar-rich diet, evade common hospital disinfectants and spread easily. They estimated this emerging species started to appear thousands of years ago, and accounts for over two thirds of healthcare C. difficile infections.

Hospitals key in the spread of extremely drug resistant bacteria in Europe

Hospitals key in the spread of extremely drug resistant bacteria in Europe Primary tabs. Image credit: Shutterstock

Hospitals key in the spread of extremely drug resistant bacteria in Europe

Research emphasises importance of ongoing genomic surveillance and infection control

New research has found that antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, an opportunistic pathogen that can cause respiratory and bloodstream infections in humans, are spreading through hospitals in Europe. Certain strains of K. pneumoniae are resistant to the carbapenem antibiotics that represent the last line of defence in treating infections and are therefore regarded as extremely drug resistant (XDR).

Cancer drug data release set to power next wave of therapeutic discovery

Cancer drug data release set to power next wave of therapeutic discovery

Cancer drug data release set to power next wave of therapeutic discovery

Unique data comparing almost 1,000 cancer cell lines’ responses to 453 licensed and experimental drugs is now freely available to the worldwide research community

The Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer project (www.cancerrxgene.org) has released the results of four years of intense research to power genetic research into cancer treatment worldwide. The new data set builds on the previous six years’ study, and practically doubles the volume of novel data available on the website – making it the largest public dataset of its kind in the world.

Sanger Institute researcher, Henry Lee-Six, wins Dr Falk Pharma/Guts UK essay prize

henry_lee_six_award.jpg

Sanger Institute researcher, Henry Lee-Six, wins Dr Falk Pharma/Guts UK essay prize

Medical student working in the Cancer Genome Project wins prize for colon cancer research

A medical student who undertook a clinical PhD at the Wellcome Sanger Institute in Cambridge has gained a top prize in the prestigious Dr Falk-Pharma/Guts UK charity national awards. Mr Henry Lee-Six won the  award for his project entitled ‘Mutational Landscape of Normal Colon’ which examined potential causes of the evolution of colon cells from normal to cancerous.

Multi-drug resistant malaria spreading in Asia

photo_credit_Chanaki_Amaratunga.jpg

Multi-drug resistant malaria spreading in Asia

Study reveals importance of ongoing genomic surveillance for malaria control strategies

Genomic surveillance has revealed that malaria resistance to two first-line antimalarial drugs has spread rapidly from Cambodia to neighbouring countries in Southeast Asia. Researchers discovered that descendants of one multi-drug resistant malaria strain are replacing the local parasites in Vietnam, Laos and northeastern Thailand, and are picking up additional new genetic changes which could further enhance resistance.

2019 Chief Medical Officer’s Report published

MSF supported cholera treatment center in Al-Sadaqa hospital, Aden, Yemen.

2019 Chief Medical Officer’s Report published

Sanger Institute researchers contribute to Professor Dame Sally Davies' eleventh annual report

The 2019 report, Health, our global asset – partnering for progress features a postcard from Professor Nick Thomson, highlighting the importance of international collaboration in tracing cholera around the globe

Low doses of radiation promote cancer-capable cells

p53 mutant cell expansion in mouse oseophageal tissue (mutant cells in red and green)

Low doses of radiation promote cancer-capable cells

New research in mice helps to understand the risks around exposure to low doses of radiation, such as CT scans and x-rays

Low doses of radiation equivalent to three CT scans, which are considered safe, give cancer-capable cells a competitive advantage over normal cells. Researchers studied the effects of low doses of radiation in mice and found it increases the number of cells with mutations in p53, a well-known genetic change associated with cancer. However, giving the mice an antioxidant before radiation promoted the growth of healthy cells, which outcompeted and replaced the p53 mutant cells.

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative boosts Human Cell Atlas research at the Sanger Institute

Human Cell Atlas

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative boosts Human Cell Atlas research at the Sanger Institute

Seed Networks projects will focus on specific tissues, such as the thymus, lung, liver, kidney and immune system

Wellcome Sanger Institute researchers will receive funding from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) for five collaborative projects supporting the Human Cell Atlas (HCA), the global initiative to map every cell type in the human body. These projects will investigate specific tissues in the thymus, lung, liver, kidney and immune system to understand health and what goes wrong in disease.

Widely-available antibiotics could be used in the treatment of ‘superbug’ MRSA

Widely-available antibiotics could be used in the treatment of ‘superbug’ MRSA

Widely-available antibiotics could be used in the treatment of ‘superbug’ MRSA

Genomic analysis shows that a significant number of strains are susceptible to penicillin combined with clavulanic acid

In Nature Microbiology, scientists have identified which gene mutations make MRSA susceptible to a combination of penicillin and clavulanic acid. Analysing the whole-genome sequences of a diverse collection of MRSA strains revealed that a significant number of strains – including USA300 clone, the dominant strain in the United States – would be treatable with this drug combination.

First lung map uncovers new insights into asthma

First lung map uncovers new insights into asthma

First lung map uncovers new insights into asthma

Understanding lung cells and their signals could help towards finding new asthma drug targets

For the first time, researchers have mapped the building blocks of the human lungs and airways, in both asthma patients and normal people. Understanding the cells and their signals could lead to finding new drug targets for treating asthma.

Pages