News Archive - 2014

News Archive - 2014

Immune cells use steroids

Immune cells use steroids

Type 2 T-helper cells produce a steroid to turn themselves off

Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) have discovered that some immune cells turn themselves off by producing a steroid. The findings have implications for the study of cancers, autoimmune diseases and parasitic infections.

Julian Parkhill and Karen Steel elected to EMBO

Julian Parkhill and Karen Steel elected to EMBO

EMBO honours Sanger Institute researchers

Professors Julian Parkhill and Karen Steel elected members of the European Molecular Biology Organization

Institute supports boost for science participation

Institute supports boost for science participation

Your Life campaign to inspire young people, particularly women, to pursue science

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute will play a major role in the Government's Your Life initiative to increase participation in science, particularly among women. The scheme, which launched today, pledges to support a change in how women and girls are encouraged to consider and pursue technology and engineering careers.

Institute researcher elected Fellow of the Royal Society

Institute researcher elected Fellow of the Royal Society

Julian Parkhill recognised for work on infectious disease

Professor Julian Parkhill, of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, has been elected to the Fellowship of the Royal Society, the UK's most prestigious scientific organisation. Professor Parkhill is a leading researcher in microbiology, using genomics to develop better understanding of bacterial evolution and improving healthcare as a direct result.

Two human genomes per hour

Two human genomes per hour

New technology to boost genome studies

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute today announced it is to deploy the recently launched Illumina HiSeq X Ten DNA sequencing platform to augment its sequencing capacity and to support its work to uncover the role of genetic variation in disease.

Seeking causes of osteoarthritis

Seeking causes of osteoarthritis

Institute awarded funding for osteoarthitis research

New Cambridgeshire study aims to unravel the genetic causes of osteoarthritis.

Tsetse fly genome reveals weaknesses

Tsetse fly genome reveals weaknesses

International 10-year project unravels biology of disease-causing fly

Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.

Origin and evolution of Bordetella pertussis

Origin and evolution of Bordetella pertussis

Impact of whooping cough vaccination revealed

Comprehensive study shows effect of vaccination on spread and diversification of Bordetella pertussis.

A plague in your family

A plague in your family

The independent evolution of harmful organisms from one bacterial family

For the first time, researchers have studied the Black Death bacterium's entire family tree to fully understand how some of the family members evolve to become harmful.

Sperm meets egg: protein essential for fertilisation discovered

Sperm meets egg: protein essential for fertilisation discovered

First vital step in fertilisation between sperm and egg discovered

Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have discovered interacting proteins on the surface of the sperm and the egg essential to begin mammalian life. These proteins, which allow the sperm and egg to recognise one another, offer new paths towards improved fertility treatments and the development of new contraceptives.

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