News Archive - 2011

News Archive - 2011

Professor Seth Grant honoured by election to the Fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh

Professor Seth Grant honoured by election to the Fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh

Fellowship recognises expertise in the genetics of brain disease and behaviour

Professor Seth Grant is one of 45 new Fellows elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE). The 2011 Fellows include leaders in the sciences, arts, humanities, the professions, industry and commerce. Professor Grant is recognised for his research, which focuses on the molecular basis of behaviour and brain disease.

Deciphering Developmental Disorders

Deciphering Developmental Disorders

New project aims to unlock genetic changes behind disorders in one in 100 births

A new nationwide project aimed at improving the care and diagnosis of developmental disorders and understanding their relation to the human genome is announced today. The Deciphering Developmental Disorders (DDD) Project aims to improve the diagnosis and care of children in the UK who fail to develop normally due to changes in their genetic makeup.

Consortium finds chronic liver cirrhosis clues

Consortium finds chronic liver cirrhosis clues

Study finds 15 new genetic signposts for primary biliary cirrhosis

Researchers have provided new clues into the genetics underlying a chronic form of liver disease, called primary biliary cirrhosis, which can lead to transplant surgery for patients. The new study identifies 15 genetic regions that affect a person's risk of developing the disease, more than trebling the number of known genetic regions, which now stands at 22.

Diabetes drug boosts survival rate for melioidosis patients

Diabetes drug boosts survival rate for melioidosis patients

Drug halves mortality rate of infectious disease endemic in Southeast Asia

Scientists have shown that a drug used to treat diabetes halves the mortality rate of melioidosis, a deadly infectious disease found in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. The results lay the foundation for the development of new, related drugs, which could use similar mechanisms to treat melioidosis and other infectious diseases in the future.

Towards a novel non-invasive prenatal diagnostic test for Down syndrome

Towards a novel non-invasive prenatal diagnostic test for Down syndrome

Research describes accurate, sensitive, specific test for Down's syndrome

Researchers have described experiments proposing a new non-invasive prenatal diagnostic test for the presence of a third chromosome 21 that is characteristic of Down syndrome (also known as Down's syndrome). Although the authors suggest a large-scale study is needed, the results, published this week in Nature Medicine, suggest the test is accurate and reliable.

Research doubles number of known genetic markers for coronary heart disease

Research doubles number of known genetic markers for coronary heart disease

Researchers analyse more than 200,000 individuals to unmask 17 heart disease DNA variants

Researchers in two international studies have discovered 17 new genetic variants linked with increased heart disease risk. The research more than doubles the known firm genetic links to coronary heart disease providing new targets and hope of developing drugs to treat this condition.

Research links 29 genome regions with common form of inflammatory bowel disease

Research links 29 genome regions with common form of inflammatory bowel disease

Genome regions are signposts to the biology of ulcerative colitis

An international team of researchers have made new links between 29 regions of the genome and ulcerative colitis - a common form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The new findings increase the total number of genome regions known to be associated with inflammatory bowel disease to 99.

Study doubles number of known human structural variants

Study doubles number of known human structural variants

1000 Genome Project data helps researchers understand the role of structural variation in human health and disease

Researchers have created the most detailed map of structural variation in the human genome. The map, which charts approaching 30,000 structural variants - half of them never seen before - will allow teams around the world to look how this kind of genetic effect can shape human health and disease.

Staying one strep ahead

Staying one strep ahead

Research shows how bacteria keep ahead of vaccines and antibiotics

New research provides the first detailed genetic picture of an evolutionary war between Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria and the vaccines and antibiotics used against it over recent decades. Large-scale genome sequencing reveals patterns of adaptation and the spread of a drug-resistant lineage of the S. pneumoniae bacteria.

Filaments, fibres and muscles in transparent embryos

Filaments, fibres and muscles in transparent embryos

Gene inactivation in zebrafish defines new role for troponin T in muscle integrity

A new study shows clearly that a muscle protein called troponin T has a role in the formation of muscle fibres and the maintenance of muscle integrity. In a study of gene inactivation in zebrafish, the researchers have shown that defective troponin T can lead to disintegration of muscle fibres.

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