News Archive - 2010

News Archive - 2010

Bacterial evolution then and there and here and now

Bacterial evolution then and there and here and now

C. difficile genome shows it is still emerging as a health problem

A study published today sheds new light on how Clostridium difficile (Cdiff) has emerged to cause disease in human populations. The team shows that, rather than evolving once as a disease-causing organism and spreading around the world, Cdiff has emerged as a pathogen many times and is likely to continue to do so.

CNVs close up

CNVs close up

New experimental approaches provide a magnifying glass to look at the mutations behind structural variation

A study looking at the DNA of three people has used a cunning new approach to examine in closer detail than previously possible the mutational processes underlying copy number variation - or CNVs - in the human genome. The findings shed light on the genetic pathways behind one of the most enigmatic forms of genetic mutation in people.

Proteins at the heart of life

Proteins at the heart of life

MitoCheck consortium develops route to find key proteins in cell division

A new study uses high-throughput systems to understand the functions of proteins involved in a most fundamental aspect of life; cell division. The work identified more than 100 proteins as being involved in this process, of which one in three had no previously known role in cell division.

Who speaks to whom in stem cell biology?

Who speaks to whom in stem cell biology?

A contact list for embryonic stem cell proteins highlights development and disease genes as key nodes of the network

A new study teases apart the vital conversations carried out by a key protein in early embryo development. The researchers have identified multiple interactions of the protein Oct4 with other proteins in embryonic stem cells: it's a Facebook of stem cell proteins.

From alpaca to zebra finch

From alpaca to zebra finch

A decade of cataloguing life's diversity

Today's publication in Nature of the genetic blueprint for the zebra finch marks 10 years of success for the Ensembl project in helping researchers to navigate the genomes of a Noah's Ark of species.

Sanger institute papers in Nature

Sanger institute papers in Nature

Institute authors contribute to five genome papers in prestigious journal

Authors from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have contributed to five publications which appear in this week's edition of the prestigious journal Nature. The journal will publish a special 'Genome Edition' in print on Thursday 1 April. This year marks 10 years since the announcement of the draft human genome sequence in June 2000.

CNVs and common disease

CNVs and common disease

Common copy number variations unlikely to contribute significantly towards common diseases

A study of the genetics of common diseases including diabetes, heart disease and bipolar disorder has found that commonly occurring copy number variations - duplicated or missing chunks of DNA in our genome - are unlikely to play a major role in such diseases. The research, funded by the Wellcome Trust, is published online today in the journal Nature.

Movies for the human genome

Movies for the human genome

Europe consortium captures gene disruption on film

At its outset, one aim of the Human Genome Project was to identify all the genes in the human genome, so as to enable systematic approaches to understanding gene function. Today, a decade on from the human draft sequence, a global scan of all 21,000 human genes identifies many ways that human genes are involved in cell biological processes such as cell division and migration - the basic stuff of life.

Allan Bradley leads translation opportunity

Allan Bradley leads translation opportunity

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Director to focus on research and development

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute announces today that Professor Allan Bradley will step down as Director of the Institute to devote time to the development of a promising novel technology in mouse genetics resulting from findings from his laboratory work. Professor Bradley will continue to lead a research lab at the Institute as one of the Institute's Faculty of leading researchers.

Sanger Institute Scientist Awarded Cancer Research Prize

Sanger Institute Scientist Awarded Cancer Research Prize

Mike Stratton receives the Lila Gruber Cancer Research Award

Professor Mike Stratton, Deputy Director of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and head of the Cancer Genome Project, has been presented with the Lila Gruber Cancer Research Award at the American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting on 5 March 2010. The award recognizes a clinician or researcher, "whose contributions in the field of cancer research have been outstanding in importance and distinction."

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