News Archive - 2010

News Archive - 2010

Kymab and Wellcome Trust sign £20 million financing agreement

Kymab and Wellcome Trust sign £20 million financing agreement

UK biopharmaceutical company will be built based on human monoclonal antibody technology from the Sanger Institute

The company is a spin-out from The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, a world leader in the Human Genome Project and genetic studies to determine the function of genes in health and disease. Kymab will develop optimised monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of select diseases with high unmet medical need using its proprietary genomically engineered mouse, the Kymouse™. The company will address a broader range of disease targets in partnership with academic organisations and pharmaceutical companies, using the Kymouse™ platform.

Decoding diabetes

Decoding diabetes

12 new genes linked to type 2 diabetes

The international consortium of scientists, led by Professor Mark McCarthy of the University of Oxford, report their findings in the journal Nature Genetics - 10 years after the first draft of the human genome was announced on 26 June 2000.

Wellcome Trust launches study of 10,000 human genomes in UK

Wellcome Trust launches study of 10,000 human genomes in UK

Ten years on from the announcement of the first draft, a new initiative will investigate 10,000 human genomes to uncover disease-causing variants

On the 10th anniversary of the completion of the first draft of the human genome - a draft which had taken 10 years to complete - the Wellcome Trust today launches a project to decode the genomes of 10,000 people over the next three years. This will be one of the largest genome sequencing programmes ever undertaken and will analyse the genomes of the equivalent of one in 6000 people in the UK.

Celebrating a 'decade of discovery' since the Human Genome Project

Celebrating a 'decade of discovery' since the Human Genome Project

New project launched to sequence 10,000 genomes in three years

Leading scientists from the public efforts to map the human genome today celebrate a decade of discovery since the announcement of the first draft 10 years ago. And in a dramatic sign of the rapid progress being made, they launched the UK 10,000 Genomes Project.

1000 Genomes Project releases data from pilot projects on path to providing database for 2,500 human genomes

1000 Genomes Project releases data from pilot projects on path to providing database for 2,500 human genomes

Freely available data supporting next generation of human genetic research

The 1000 Genomes Project, an international public-private consortium to build the most detailed map of human genetic variation to date, announces the completion of three pilot projects and the deposition of the final resulting data in freely available public databases for use by the research community. In addition, work has begun on the full-scale effort to build a public database containing information from the genomes of 2,500 people from 27 populations around the world.

Making cancer killers

Making cancer killers

Reprogramming immune system cells to produce natural killer cells for cancer

A team of researchers has developed a method to produce cells that kill tumour cells in the lab and prevent tumours forming in mouse models of cancer. Although the current work is in cells and mouse, if the research transfers to human biology, the new type of cell could be a new source for cell-based anticancer therapies.

Professor Mike Stratton appointed new Director

Professor Mike Stratton appointed new Director

World-leading cancer genome expert appointed new Director of Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Professor Stratton has been Deputy Director of the Institute since 2007, where he heads the highly successful Cancer Genome Project and is a leader of the International Cancer Genome Consortium.

Institute researcher wins Benjamin Franklin award

Institute researcher wins Benjamin Franklin award

Alex Bateman honoured for promoting open access in the life sciences

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute researcher, Dr Alex Bateman, has been presented with the Benjamin Franklin Award for Open Access in the Life Sciences. The humanitarian or bioethics award is presented annually by the Bioinformatics Organization to "an individual who has, in his or her practice, promoted free and open access to the materials and methods used in the life sciences."

Cataloguing cancer codes

Cataloguing cancer codes

International Cancer Genome Consortium plans to sequence 25,000 cancer genomes

The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) today set out its bold plan to decode the genomes from 25,000 cancer samples and create a resource of freely available data that will help cancer researchers around the world. The publication outlines research design and projects as well as the important ethical framework for this science.

Sequence is scaffold to study sleeping sickness

Sequence is scaffold to study sleeping sickness

Study probes Trypanosoma parasite genome for cause of human infectivity

Researchers have made a further step toward understanding sleeping sickness - a chronic disease caused by Trypanosoma parasites, which affect the human central nervous system. The team have generated a high-quality draft genome sequence for the strain of Trypanosoma brucei hat is responsible for almost all reported cases of human African trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness. The study is published on April 13 in the open-access journal, PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

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