News Archive - 2009

News Archive - 2009

First draft of the pig genome

First draft of the pig genome

New tool for agriculture, medicine, conservation and evolution.

A global collaborative has produced a first draft of the genome of a domesticated pig, an achievement that will lead to insights in agriculture, medicine, conservation and evolution.

Sanger Institute duo among 66 honoured

Sanger Institute duo among 66 honoured

Two Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute researchers elected to EMBO membership

Two researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have been awarded membership of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO), which promotes excellence in molecular life sciences in Europe by recognizing and fostering talented scientists.

TraDIS technique tackles typhoid

TraDIS technique tackles typhoid

First high-throughput functional analysis of every Salmonella Typhi gene

For the first time, researchers are able to look at the need for every gene in a bacterial cell in a single experiment. The new method will transform the study of gene activity and the search for weaknesses in bacterial armouries.

Blood counts are clues to human disease

Blood counts are clues to human disease

Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 22 regions associated with blood cell traits

A new genome-wide association study published today in Nature Genetics begins to uncover the basis of genetic variations in eight blood measurements and the impact those variants can have on common human diseases. Blood measurements, including the number and volume of cells in the blood, are routinely used to diagnose a wide range of disorders, including anaemia, infection and blood cell cancers.

Standards for a new genomic age

Standards for a new genomic age

Joint Announcement sets Six Genome Sequence Standards

New standards in genome sequencing are called for today: the report authors assert that the world of genome sequencing must establish a suite of benchmarks against which a new genome sequence can be measured. The measures are independent of the technology used to deliver the sequence.

Jumping genes, gene loss and genome dark matter

Jumping genes, gene loss and genome dark matter

New map of copy number variation in the human genome is a resource for human genetics

In research published today by Nature, an international team describes the finest map of changes to the structure of human genomes and a resource they have developed for researchers worldwide to look at the role of these changes in human disease. They also identify 75 'jumping genes' - regions of our genome that can be found in more than one location in some individuals.

Candida can do less

Candida can do less

Genome sequence shows Candida dubliniensis has lost genes found in Candida albicans

Sanger Institute researchers and their collaborators have published the genome of a species of Candida that is closely related to the most pathogenic of human yeasts, Candida albicans. The new sequence of the less virulent relative, Candida dubliniensis, suggests that it has lost many genes found in C. albicans and thereby diminishing its potency as a pathogen. The work was a collaboration from labs in the UK, Ireland, Austria and New Zealand.

Sparking debate on data and resource sharing

Sparking debate on data and resource sharing

Two new opinion statements on how best to maximize research benefits

The reports from two major meetings assert that wider sharing of biological data and of resources is needed to maximize the benefit from biomedical research. The reports, from meetings in Toronto on data sharing and in Rome on sharing data and biological resources in mouse functional genomics, are published in Nature Thursday 10 September 2009.

Senior Sanger Institute Investigator awarded Carter medal

Senior Sanger Institute Investigator awarded Carter medal

Professor Leena Peltonen is recognised for outstanding contribution to clinical genetics

Professor Leena Peltonen, Head of Human Genetics at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and a leading molecular geneticist, has been awarded the prestigious Carter medal by the Clinical Genetics Society. The honour recognises her outstanding contribution to clinical genetics.

We are all mutants

We are all mutants

Measurement of mutation rate in humans by direct sequencing

An international team of 16 scientists today reports the first direct measurement of the general rate of genetic mutation at individual DNA letters in humans. The team sequenced the same piece of DNA - 10,000,000 or so letters or 'nucleotides' from the Y chromosome - from two men separated by 13 generations, and counted the number of differences. Among all these nucleotides, they found only four mutations.

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