News Archive - 2002

News Archive - 2002

MHC Haplotype Consortium Web Resource

MHC Haplotype Consortium Web Resource

A Cambridge-based Consortium today announced a new web resource designed to help medical researchers in the fight against diseases like diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

The MHC Haplotype Consortium - formed by researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge - will define the most common differences in DNA code that can lead to these diseases. An accurate molecular understanding should lead to improved diagnosis and treatment.

The complete genome of Mycobacterium bovis has been sequenced

The complete genome of Mycobacterium bovis has been sequenced

A step forward in the fight against bovine tuberculosis: The complete genome of Mycobacterium bovis has been sequenced

The sequencing project has revealed that the genome of M. bovis is greater than 99.9% identical to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, which kills over two million people a year. Analysis of the two genomes has revealed an unexpected evolutionary scenario for the development of these two pathogens. Since the M. bovis genome is smaller than that of M. tuberculosis, it is more likely that man gave tuberculosis to cattle or that the two organisms evolved separately from a common ancestor.

Humble yeast to help tackle cancer

Humble yeast to help tackle cancer

A British-led international team of scientists has broken the genetic code of fission yeast, a development which is likely to have major implications for the future of cancer and bio-medical research.

In today's Nature (Thursday 21 February 2002), Dr Paul Nurse, who is Joint Director General of Cancer Research UK, and Dr Bart Barrell and Val Wood from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, report their analysis of the genome of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe). Fifty of the yeast genes were found to have significant similarity with genes involved in human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, hereditary deafness and non insulin dependent diabetes, and half were found to be cancer related.

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