Sanger Institute researcher honoured by EMBO

Professor Nicole Soranzo becomes an elected member of the European Molecular Biology Organization

Sanger Institute researcher honoured by EMBO

Professor Nicole Soranzo has been elected as an EMBO Member
Professor Nicole Soranzo has been elected as a member of EMBO

Professor Nicole Soranzo joins 48 fellow scientists from 17 countries in being elected as Members of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO). An additional eight researchers from Argentina, Australia, Japan and the US have become Associate Members of the organisation whose mission is to promote excellence in European molecular life sciences research.

Professor Soranzo plays a pivotal role at the Wellcome Sanger Institute in understanding the role of genetics and molecular pathways in determining cardiovascular health. In particular, Nicole explores the relationship between metabolic pathways and signalling in blood cell development and the impact this has on diseases ranging from heart disease to blood clotting and inflammatory disorders.

"I am delighted to be elected to EMBO. Understanding the molecular basis of health and disease, through the lens of genetics, is central to my scientific approach. To join such a distinguished group of scientists is an honour. Yet the scale of science needed to investigate the underlying genetics of complex disease requires worldwide collaboration and I would like to thank everyone in my team and all my collaborators for their dedication, creativity and support."

Professor Nicole Soranzo, Wellcome Sanger Institute

As an EMBO Member, Professor Soranzo will play an active role in helping to guide the organisation’s activities by serving on committees, evaluating funding applications and mentoring young scientists. The latter role is particularly close to her heart; at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Nicole chairs the Postdoctoral Research Fellows committee that supports the training, career development and mentoring of the next generation of genomics research leaders.

"Nicole is an inspiring scientist whose research is opening up new fields of scientific exploration into the underlying molecular biology of health and disease. Her dedication to nurturing world-class science through collaboration is laying firm foundations for genomic research for years to come and I am thrilled that she has received this honour."

Professor Sir Mike Stratton, Director of the Sanger Institute

Ever since the very first EMBO Council in 1963, new members are nominated and elected by the existing membership. The new members will be formally welcomed at the Annual Members’ Meeting in Heidelberg between 29 and 31 October 2019.

"EMBO Members are excellent scientists who conduct research at the forefront of all life science disciplines, ranging from computational models or analyses of single molecules and cellular mechanics to the study of higher-order systems in development, cognitive neuroscience and evolution.”

Maria Leptin, EMBO Director

Notes to Editors
Selected Websites
What is a complex disease?FactsWhat is a complex disease?
Many common diseases are influenced by a combination of multiple genes and environmental factors. These diseases are referred to as complex diseases.

Genome-wide association studiesStoriesGenome-wide association studies
Genome-wide association studies have led to the discovery of hundreds of genes with a role in common diseases. 

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