Sanger Institute - Publications 1996

Number of papers published in 1996: 5

  • Life with 6000 genes.

    Goffeau A, Barrell BG, Bussey H, Davis RW, Dujon B, Feldmann H, Galibert F, Hoheisel JD, Jacq C, Johnston M, Louis EJ, Mewes HW, Murakami Y, Philippsen P, Tettelin H and Oliver SG

    Université Catholique de Louvain, Unité de Biochimie Physiologique, Place Croix du Sud, 2/20, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.

    The genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been completely sequenced through a worldwide collaboration. The sequence of 12,068 kilobases defines 5885 potential protein-encoding genes, approximately 140 genes specifying ribosomal RNA, 40 genes for small nuclear RNA molecules, and 275 transfer RNA genes. In addition, the complete sequence provides information about the higher order organization of yeast's 16 chromosomes and allows some insight into their evolutionary history. The genome shows a considerable amount of apparent genetic redundancy, and one of the major problems to be tackled during the next stage of the yeast genome project is to elucidate the biological functions of all of these genes.

    Funded by: Wellcome Trust

    Science (New York, N.Y.) 1996;274;5287;546, 563-7

  • Characterization of DRP2, a novel human dystrophin homologue.

    Roberts RG, Freeman TC, Kendall E, Vetrie DL, Dixon AK, Shaw-Smith C, Bone Q and Bobrow M

    Division of Medical and Molecular Genetics, UMDS, London, UK.

    The currently recognised dystrophin protein family comprises the archetype, dystrophin, its close relative, utrophin or dystrophin-related protein (DRP), and a distantly related protein known as the 87K tyrosine kinase substrate. During the course of a phylogenetic study of sequences encoding the characteristic C-terminal domains of dystrophin-related proteins, we identified an unexpected novel class of vertebrate dystrophin-related sequences. We term this class dystrophin-related protein 2 (DRP2), and suggest that utrophin/DRP be renamed DRP1 to simplify future nomenclature. DRP2 is a relatively small protein, encoded in man by a 45 kb gene localized to Xq22. It is expressed principally in the brain and spinal cord, and is similar in overall structure to the Dp116 dystrophin isoform. The discovery of a novel relative of dystrophin substantially broadens the scope for study of this interesting group of proteins and their associated glycoprotein complexes.

    Nature genetics 1996;13;2;223-6

  • Genome maps 7. The human transcript map. Wall chart.

    Schuler GD, Boguski MS, Hudson TJ, Hui L, Ma J, Castle AB, Wu X, Silva J, Nusbaum HC, Birren BB, Slonim DK, Rozen S, Stein LD, Page D, Lander ES, Stewart EA, Aggarwal A, Bajorek E, Brady S, Chu S, Fang N, Hadley D, Harris M, Hussain S, Hudson JR et al.

    National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA.

    Science (New York, N.Y.) 1996;274;5287;547-62

  • A gene map of the human genome.

    Schuler GD, Boguski MS, Stewart EA, Stein LD, Gyapay G, Rice K, White RE, Rodriguez-Tomé P, Aggarwal A, Bajorek E, Bentolila S, Birren BB, Butler A, Castle AB, Chiannilkulchai N, Chu A, Clee C, Cowles S, Day PJ, Dibling T, Drouot N, Dunham I, Duprat S, East C, Edwards C, Fan JB, Fang N, Fizames C, Garrett C, Green L, Hadley D, Harris M, Harrison P, Brady S, Hicks A, Holloway E, Hui L, Hussain S, Louis-Dit-Sully C, Ma J, MacGilvery A, Mader C, Maratukulam A, Matise TC, McKusick KB, Morissette J, Mungall A, Muselet D, Nusbaum HC, Page DC, Peck A, Perkins S, Piercy M, Qin F, Quackenbush J, Ranby S, Reif T, Rozen S, Sanders C, She X, Silva J, Slonim DK, Soderlund C, Sun WL, Tabar P, Thangarajah T, Vega-Czarny N, Vollrath D, Voyticky S, Wilmer T, Wu X, Adams MD, Auffray C, Walter NA, Brandon R, Dehejia A, Goodfellow PN, Houlgatte R, Hudson JR, Ide SE, Iorio KR, Lee WY, Seki N, Nagase T, Ishikawa K, Nomura N, Phillips C, Polymeropoulos MH, Sandusky M, Schmitt K, Berry R, Swanson K, Torres R, Venter JC, Sikela JM, Beckmann JS, Weissenbach J, Myers RM, Cox DR, James MR, Bentley D, Deloukas P, Lander ES and Hudson TJ

    National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA.

    The human genome is thought to harbor 50,000 to 100,000 genes, of which about half have been sampled to date in the form of expressed sequence tags. An international consortium was organized to develop and map gene-based sequence tagged site markers on a set of two radiation hybrid panels and a yeast artificial chromosome library. More than 16,000 human genes have been mapped relative to a framework map that contains about 1000 polymorphic genetic markers. The gene map unifies the existing genetic and physical maps with the nucleotide and protein sequence databases in a fashion that should speed the discovery of genes underlying inherited human disease. The integrated resource is available through a site on the World Wide Web at

    Funded by: NHGRI NIH HHS: HG00098, HG00206, HG00835; Wellcome Trust; ...

    Science (New York, N.Y.) 1996;274;5287;540-6

  • The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome on the World Wide Web.

    Walsh S and Barrell B

    Sanger Centre, Hinxton Hall, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK.

    Funded by: Wellcome Trust

    Trends in genetics : TIG 1996;12;7;276-7

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