Dr Richard Durbin

Associate Faculty

I am involved in a wide variety of genomic genetics projects from a computational and mathematical perspective. Current interests include genetic variation, evolutionary and population genetics in humans and cichlid fishes, and algorithms and software for high-throughput sequencing and genome assembly.

I typically have a research group of around ten students, postdocs and staff scientists, and am also involved in a large number of collaborative projects. Applicants for postdoc or visiting positions are welcome at any time; please email me with an outline of what you are interested in doing and why it would fit with my group. A list of current projects can be found at my research group page.

In the past I have led a number of large scale genomics projects, including the 1000 Genomes Project (with David Altshuler at the Broad Institute) and the UK10K project, both of which completed in 2015, and the gorilla reference sequencing project. Previously I worked on sequence analysis software including hidden Markov model (HMM) methods for gene finding and protein similarity detection, jointly authoring a book Biological Sequence analysis with Sean Eddy, Anders Krogh and Graeme Mitchison. I also helped establish a number of reference genomic databases including WormBase for C.elegans biology (using the ACeDB software I co-developed with Jean Thierry-Mieg), Pfam, TreeFam and Ensembl.

My timeline

 

My publications

Loading publications...

Connect with me on Twitter

#BoG20 @ilianaBista sequenced genomes of 24 new Antarctic icefish. Analyses shows rapid radiation of Antarctic fish. TE expansion shows role in cold adaptation and diversification. Reconstruct evolution of antifreeze glycoprotein across species. Cool icefish😀

the Sanger Prize is a wonderful chance for an undergraduate student from a low or middle income country to come spend 3 months @sangerinstitute doing an internship on genomics with scientists here. applications open now. Please RT!

404: page not found - Wellcome Sanger Institute

I'm sorry, your page cannot be found on this site.

www.sanger.ac.uk