Sanger Institute animal research facility to close

Following a full review, the Sanger Institute will be closing its animal research facility

Sanger Institute animal research facility to close

Following a rigorous review and consultation with the Sanger Institute board and the Genome Research Limited board, which has representation from Wellcome, the Sanger Institute has made the difficult decision to close its animal facility. This decision has been driven by the Institute’s scientific strategy.

The Sanger Institute is increasingly using alternative technologies to deliver its scientific strategy and this has led to fewer mice being needed. Because of this decrease in animal numbers, transferring the mouse work to another facility is the best way for the Institute to deliver all of its scientific goals.

The Sanger Institute is working with other institutions to find a solution to accommodate its future mouse research requirements.

The closure is expected to take place over the next few years. Discussions will continue over coming months to establish how to deliver this change in line with the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act, to safeguard the welfare of the animals.

The staff that operate the animal facility will be fully supported throughout the process.

“Scientific research involving mice will remain an important part of Sanger Institute science, and will continue at reduced levels in the future. This has been a difficult decision, but we believe it is the best way to continue to deliver the science and make the discoveries that impact on human health and the natural world.”

Professor Sir Mike Stratton, Director of the Wellcome Sanger Institute

Contact the Press Office

Dr Samantha Wynne, Media Officer

Tel +44 (0)1223 492 368

Emily Mobley, Media Officer

Tel +44 (0)1223 496 851

Wellcome Sanger Institute,
Hinxton,
Cambridgeshire,
CB10 1SA,
UK

Mobile +44 (0) 7900 607793

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