Genomic Expressions: Express yourself at new exhibition

The exhibition is part of the Wellcome Genome Campus’ Open Saturdays programme dates include 24 March, 21 April, 19 May and 16 June 2018

Genomic Expressions: Express yourself at new exhibition

Genomic Expressions Open Saturdays on the Wellcome Genome Campus - Metastasis by Alex Cagan
Metastasis by Alex Cagan, part of the Genomic Expressions event Open Saturdays on the Wellcome Genome Campus

What does genomics mean to you? It may mean family and inheritance, or scientific research into disease and big data. How would you answer the question? Genomic Expressions is a new exhibition at the Wellcome Genome Campus that displays the creative efforts of the people who work across the campus, reflecting what genomics means to them – from vivid paintings and sculptures to baked goods and audio experiences.

The exhibition is part of the Wellcome Genome Campus’ Open Saturdays programme, which are free to attend but booking is required. Open Saturday dates include 24th March, 21st April, 19th May and 16th June 2018.

A genome is the unique DNA code possessed by all living things. It is the set of genetic instructions needed to create life. The Wellcome Genome Campus was established as part of the Human Genome Project, an initiative to sequence the entire human genome for the first time. The project took 13 years to complete but it changed how we understand biology. Today, researchers based at the Wellcome Genome Campus work towards understanding thousands of genomes to help improve human health.

Genomic Expressions Open Saturdays on the Wellcome Genome Campus - CB1 3AH by Keith James
CB1 3AH by Keith James - part of the Genomic Expressions event Open Saturdays on the Wellcome Genome Campus

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Wellcome Sanger Institute, one of the two institutes based at the Wellcome Genome Campus that was established as part of the Human Genome Project. To reflect on 25 years of genomic research on the campus, research assistants, administrators, software developers and senior scientists have come together to express in an exhibition what genomics means to them.

“One of the wonderful things about being a genome scientist is the personal connection to your own research. My work involves finding genetic variants involved with diseases, and every one of those discoveries tells me something about myself, too.”

Dr Jeffrey Barrett, Director of Open Targets and Senior Group Leader at the Wellcome Sanger Institute

“Genomics means ‘family’ to me. It’s the silver thread that links me to my relatives; it’s about what is shared within my family and our communal heritage. My sister, mother and maternal grandfather are all artists and sculptors.”

Dr Anna Middleton, Head of Society and Ethics Research at the Wellcome Genome Campus

“For me, genomics is about exploration. It is a chance to understand a hidden language that unites all life yet at the same time, almost paradoxically, underscores biological diversity.”

Alex Cagan, Postdoctoral Fellow at the Wellcome Sanger Institute

Notes to Editors

The exhibition is available to visit as part of the Wellcome Genome Campus’ Open Saturdays programme, where everyone is welcome to visit the campus.

Dates to visit include:

  • Saturday 24th March, 12-2:30pm
  • Saturday 21st April, 1-3:30pm
  • Saturday 19th May, 1-3:30pm
  • Saturday 16th June, 1-3:30pm

Open Saturdays are free for all but booking is required. Genomic Expression is also open by arrangements for group visits. For further details, and to book your free tickets, visit: www.wgc.org.uk/engage

Selected Websites
What was the Human Genome Project for?StoriesWhat was the Human Genome Project for?
The Human Genome Project, which began officially in 1990, was the largest international collaboration ever undertaken in biology and involved thousands of scientists.

How did the Human Genome Project come about?StoriesHow did the Human Genome Project come about?
It was a project of such a huge size that no one thought it would be possible at that time, but with the support of key scientists and considerable funding, the Human Genome Project began…

How did the Human Genome Project make science more accessible?StoriesHow did the Human Genome Project make science more accessible?
The Human Genome Project was a pioneer for encouraging open access to scientific research. In 1996, those involved agreed that all new information produced should be made freely available to all within 24 hours.

How is the completed human genome sequence being used?StoriesHow is the completed human genome sequence being used?
It has been over a decade since the Human Genome Project was finished, so what has been happening since and how is the completed human genome sequence being used?

Personal genomics: the future of healthcare?StoriesPersonal genomics: the future of healthcare?
Personal genomics is an area of genomics focusing specifically on the sequencing and analysis of one person’s genome, and then giving them their genomic information.

Contact the Press Office

Dr Samantha Wynne, Media Officer

Tel +44 (0)1223 492 368

Emily Mobley, Media Officer

Tel +44 (0)1223 496 851

Wellcome Sanger Institute,
Hinxton,
Cambridgeshire,
CB10 1SA,
UK

Mobile +44 (0) 7900 607793

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