Dr Julia Steinberg | Postdoctoral Fellow

This person is a member of Sanger Institute Alumni.

Steinberg, Julia

Julia focuses on gaining insights into complex human diseases, particularly the underlying biological pathways and networks. She works on integrative approaches at the forefront of high-throughput multi-omics data, combining genetics, methylation, transcription, and proteomics datasets. Julia both develops new methods and applies them to disease data.

Human diseases have a strong burden on both affected individuals and society as a whole. Many of these diseases have a strong genomic component, which can be used to improve the understanding of the disease, leading to better prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

Consequently, my aim is to uncover the genetic and genomic contribution to a range of human disorders. To this end, I combine a variety of datasets and techniques:

  • I use genetic sequencing data to identify genetic variants that are associated with complex human traits. In particular, isolated populations can be used to identify rare variants that have risen to higher frequency and are possibly under selection. Consequently, I am looking into associations with haematological traits in Greek and Ugandan isolated populations.
  • I apply gene-set and network association approaches for genetic data (from single nucleotide to copy number variants) to uncover the biological processes that contribute to the disease aetiology. For example, I have developed an approach to test whether affected individuals have an accumulation of gene disruptions in a given pathway, and applied this successfully to autism (see publications below).
  • I analyse and combine methylation, gene expression, and proteomics data to understand the differences between disease and intact tissue samples within individuals or between individuals. This can identify convergence on both gene and gene-set level. For example, I have found strong convergence of gene-sets associated with knee osteoarthritis based on the three -omics data types (publication forthcoming). Further work on hip osteoarthritis is in progress.

In the future, I aim to further work on large-scale genetic and genomic data. In particular, the growth of biobanks and electronic health records will offer an unprecedented volume of phenotype and multi-omics data with high granularity. Therefore, integrative methods will be central to maximise the insights and thus health benefits of genetics and genomics.

Publications

  • Functional genomics in osteoarthritis: Past, present, and future.

    Steinberg J and Zeggini E

    Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society 2016;34;7;1105-10

  • Haploinsufficiency predictions without study bias.

    Steinberg J, Honti F, Meader S and Webber C

    Nucleic acids research 2015;43;15;e101

  • The roles of FMRP-regulated genes in autism spectrum disorder: single- and multiple-hit genetic etiologies.

    Steinberg J and Webber C

    American journal of human genetics 2013;93;5;825-39

  • GeneNet Toolbox for MATLAB: a flexible platform for the analysis of gene connectivity in biological networks.

    Taylor A, Steinberg J, Andrews TS and Webber C

    Bioinformatics (Oxford, England) 2015;31;3;442-4

  • Functional genomics in osteoarthritis: Past, present, and future.

    Steinberg J and Zeggini E

    Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society 2016;34;7;1105-10

  • Haploinsufficiency predictions without study bias.

    Steinberg J, Honti F, Meader S and Webber C

    Nucleic acids research 2015;43;15;e101

  • Duplications in ADHD patients harbour neurobehavioural genes that are co-expressed with genes associated with hyperactivity in the mouse.

    Taylor A, Steinberg J and Webber C

    American journal of medical genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric genetics : the official publication of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics 2015;168B;2;97-107

  • Gene networks underlying convergent and pleiotropic phenotypes in a large and systematically-phenotyped cohort with heterogeneous developmental disorders.

    Andrews T, Meader S, Vulto-van Silfhout A, Taylor A, Steinberg J et al.

    PLoS genetics 2015;11;3;e1005012

  • GeneNet Toolbox for MATLAB: a flexible platform for the analysis of gene connectivity in biological networks.

    Taylor A, Steinberg J, Andrews TS and Webber C

    Bioinformatics (Oxford, England) 2015;31;3;442-4

  • Gene age predicts the strength of purifying selection acting on gene expression variation in humans.

    Popadin KY, Gutierrez-Arcelus M, Lappalainen T, Buil A, Steinberg J et al.

    American journal of human genetics 2014;95;6;660-74

  • Summaries of oral sessions at the XXI World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics, Boston, Massachusetts, 17-21 October 2013: state of the field.

    Akpudo H, Aleksic B, Alkelai A, Burton C, Carrillo-Roa T et al.

    Psychiatric genetics 2014;24;4;125-50

  • Diagnostically relevant facial gestalt information from ordinary photos.

    Ferry Q, Steinberg J, Webber C, FitzPatrick DR, Ponting CP et al.

    eLife 2014;3;e02020

  • The roles of FMRP-regulated genes in autism spectrum disorder: single- and multiple-hit genetic etiologies.

    Steinberg J and Webber C

    American journal of human genetics 2013;93;5;825-39

Steinberg, Julia
Julia's Timeline
2016

Appointed as Bye Fellow, Murray Edwards College, University of Cambridge

2015

Appointed as Research Associate, Murray Edwards College, University of Cambridge

Appointed as Postdoctoral Fellow at the Sanger Institute, Analytical Genomics of Complex Traits team

DPhil, University of Oxford: "Functional Genomics Analyses of Neuropsychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Disorders"

2013

Early Career Investigator Award Finalist, XXIst World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics

2010

Wellcome Trust 4-year PhD Studentship, University of Oxford

MMath, University of Oxford (Double First Class Honours)

Gibbs Prize for Mathematics, University of Oxford

2009

Junior Mathematics Prize, University of Oxford