LifeLab 2019 – discovery on your doorstep with an exciting programme of free events and activities

LifeLab has launched an exciting programme of events for Friday 27 and Saturday 28 September 2019, transforming parts of Cambridge, Peterborough and Ely into discovery zones for the weekend

LifeLab 2019 – discovery on your doorstep with an exciting programme of free events and activities

LifeLab in action

LifeLab has launched an exciting programme of events for Friday 27th and Saturday 28th September 2019, transforming parts of Cambridge, Peterborough and Ely into discovery zones for the weekend. Most events are free, taking place in a range of venues including shopping centres, theatres, cafes and bars.

Family-friendly activities include experiments, hands-on activities and storytelling at our pop-up labs in Ely Cathedral, Cambridge’s Grafton Centre and Peterborough’s Queensgate Centre. There’s a chance to explore the world of coding at an ‘in for a pound’ Saturday special at Cambridge Science Centre. We’ll also be hosting an evening programme of comedy, conversation and performance at venues including the Cambridge Junction, Ely Cathedral and Peterborough’s Key Theatre.

LifeLab’s overall aim is to connect communities across Cambridgeshire with the exciting life science and innovation happening on their doorstep.

“Last year LifeLab was a big success in Peterborough and Cambridge, with over 3,500 people coming together with 160 scientists, technicians and software developers across 50 different activities and events. It’s great to be back and we’re doubly delighted to be expanding our 2019 programme into Ely as well.”

Dr Kenneth Skeldon, LifeLab lead from Wellcome Genome Campus Public Engagement 

LifeLab

LifeLab is led by Wellcome Genome Campus Public Engagement, and brings together five of the region’s leading life science research organisations: the Wellcome Sanger Institute, EMBL’s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), the Babraham Institute, the University of Cambridge and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology.

LifeLab is part of the European Researchers’ Night, an annual celebration of research that takes place in 371 cities across Europe in September. The initiative is supported by the European Commission’s Marie Skłodowska-Curie funding programme.

The full programme of events in Cambridgeshire is available at www.camlifelab.co.uk. Most events are drop in, but some require advanced booking and/or paid entry on the door. Following @camlifelab on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram is an excellent way to keep up to date with the latest event news as well as sharing the excitement behind the scenes in the lead up to the weekend itself.

Notes to Editors
About LifeLab

LifeLab is coordinated by Wellcome Genome Campus Public Engagement partnering with five Cambridgeshire-based research institutions: The Wellcome Sanger Institute, the Babraham Institute, EMBL’s European Bioinformatics Institute, the University of Cambridge and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology.​

​It is one of 55 European Commission funded projects for European Researchers’ Night, a Europe-wide public event taking place across 370 cities dedicated to celebrating popular science and fun learning.

​LifeLab gives you a chance to meet researchers and join them in events and activities exploring the latest breakthroughs and discoveries. With family, friends, your school or on your own, become a scientist and participate in research activities – join us to discover, have fun and be inspired!

https://camlifelab.co.uk/

Funding

This European Researchers’ Night project (818722) is funded by the European Commission under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie actions.

Contact the Press Office

Emily Mobley, Media Manager

Tel +44 (0)1223 496 851

Dr Samantha Wynne, Media Officer

Tel +44 (0)1223 492 368

Dr Matthew Midgley, Media Officer

Tel +44 (0)1223 494 856

Wellcome Sanger Institute,
Hinxton,
Cambridgeshire,
CB10 1SA,
UK

Mobile +44 (0) 7748 379849

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