Landmark project shows heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis risk raised by genetic changes in blood cells

As part of BLUEPRINT, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute led two of the six papers published in the journal Cell

Landmark project shows heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis risk raised by genetic changes in blood cells

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Today (17 November) in Cell and associated journals, 24 research studies from the landmark BLUEPRINT project and IHEC consortia reveal how variation in blood cells’ characteristics and numbers can affect a person’s risk of developing complex diseases such as heart disease, and autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes.

The papers, along with another 17 in other high-impact journals, represent the culmination of a five-year, £25 million (€30 million) project that brought together 42 leading European universities, research institutes and industry partners and the work of IHEC. The project’s goals were to explore and describe the range of epigenetic changes that take place in bone marrow as stem cells develop into different types of mature blood cell. It also sought to match epigenetic changes and genetic differences to the physical characteristics of each cell type and use this knowledge to understand how these can lead to blood disorders, cancer and other complex diseases*.

As part of BLUEPRINT, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute led two of the six papers being published in the journal Cell.

In the first study, Sanger Institute researchers worked closely with colleagues at the University of Cambridge and the University of Oxford to carry out the largest and most in-depth study of DNA and blood cell characteristics using the UK BioBank resource and the INTERVAL study**. By comparing almost 30 million DNA sequence differences in more than 173,000 people with variation in the physical properties of blood cells the scientists identified 2,500 previously undiscovered locations in the genome that influence blood cell characteristics and functions. Further work showed that genetic differences affecting some of these characteristics are linked to increased risk of heart attack, or to rheumatoid arthritis and other common autoimmune diseases.

“The scale, resolution and homogeneity of our work were vital. Because we examined so many people we were able to discover important ‘rare and low frequency’ genetic differences that are present in fewer than 10 per cent of the population. We found that these can have a much larger impact on the characteristics of blood cells than the common differences studied previously. Of the more than 300 rare and low frequency difference we found, 74 appear to affect the structure of proteins. These give us important clues as to which biological pathways are involved in controlling the production, function and characteristics of blood cells.”

Dr William Astle, one of the paper's first authors, from the University of Cambridge

The team found that genetic differences that cause people to have more young red blood cells in their peripheral bloodstreams also increase the risk they will have a heart attack.

“When mature red blood cells rupture in our blood the body replaces them with new, young red cells – a process known as haemolysis. So we think that increased haemolysis and increased risk of coronary heart disease are affected by the same biological pathways. Identifying these pathways may offer new treatment possibilities.”

Dr Adam Butterworth, one of the study’s senior authors, from the University of Cambridge

"By combining our detailed genetic information with data from the BLUEPRINT project, we were able to identify with high certainty "active" regions of the human genome that are more likely to be involved in disease mechanisms."

Heather Elding, one of the paper’s first authors, from the Sanger Institute

For example, in another new finding, the research team showed that genetic differences that increased the amount of certain white blood cells, known as eosinophils, also increased the risk of a person developing rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes.

In the second Cell paper, researchers collaborated with scientists at the University of Cambridge, McGill University in Canada and several UK and European institutions to explore the role that epigenetics plays in the development and function of three major human immune cell types: CD14+ monocytes, CD16+ neutrophils and naïve CD4+ T cells, from the genomes of 197 individuals. They studied the contributions of various genetic control mechanisms, including epigenetic changes such as methyl tags on promoter regions in the DNA and histone modifications, to understand how these different levels of regulation interacted with genetic differences to change the expression of genes, immune function and, ultimately, human disease.

The team identified 345 regions of the genome where they could pinpoint the likely molecular causes underlying a person’s predisposition to immune-related diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis.

“We have created an expansive, high-resolution atlas of variations that deepens our understanding of the interplay between the genetic and epigenetic machinery that drives the three primary cells of the human immune system. We have identified hundreds of genetic variations associated with autoimmune diseases that appear to affect the activity of genes in specific regions of the genome, pointing to biological pathways that may be involved in disease and which, ultimately, may be treatable with medication.”

Dr Tomi Pastinen, senior author on the second study, from McGill University

“The BLUEPRINT project has provided the worldwide research community with detailed insights and understandings that will form the basis of important blood cell research for many years to come. When integrated with large-scale genetic studies, these results and data inform understanding of how differences in the human genome and epigenome interact to cause devastating common diseases, and inform new avenues for treating these conditions."

Professor Nicole Soranzo, senior author on both studies from the Sanger Institute and University of Cambridge

Notes to Editors
Publications
  1. Astle WJ et al. (2016) The allelic landscape of human blood cell trait variation and links to common complex disease. Cell http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2016.10.042
  2. Chen L et al. (2016) Genetic drivers of epigenetic and transcriptional variation in human immune cells. Cell http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2016.10.026
Quote in support of the BLUEPRINT research

“Our genes are critical to our health and there’s still a wealth of information hidden in our genetic code. By taking advantage of a large scale international collaboration, involving the combined expertise of dozens of research groups, these unprecedented studies have uncovered potentially crucial knowledge for the development of new life saving treatments for heart disease and many other deadly conditions.

“Collaborations like this, which rely on funding from the public through charities and governments across the globe, are vital for analysing and understanding the secrets of our genetics. Research of this kind is helping us to beat disease and improve millions of lives.”

Professor Jeremy Pearson, Associate Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation, which helped fund the research

*About BLUEPRINT

One of the great mysteries in biology is how the many different cell types that make up our bodies are derived from a single cell and from one DNA sequence, or genome. We have learned a lot from studying the human genome, but have only partially unveiled the processes underlying cell determination. The identity of each cell type is largely defined by an instructive layer of molecular annotations on top of the genome – the epigenome – which acts as a blueprint unique to each cell type and developmental stage. Unlike the genome the epigenome changes as cells develop and in response to changes in the environment. Defects in the factors that read, write and erase the epigenetic blueprint are involved in many diseases. The comprehensive analysis of the epigenomes of healthy and abnormal cells will facilitate new ways to diagnose and treat various diseases, and ultimately lead to improved health outcomes.

A collection of 41 coordinated papers now published by scientists from across the International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) sheds light on these processes, taking global research in the field of epigenomics a major step forward. A set of 24 manuscripts has been released as a package in Cell and Cell Press - associated journals, and an additional 17 papers have been published in other high-impact journals.

These papers represent the most recent work of IHEC member projects from Canada, the European Union, Germany, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and the United States. The collection of publications showcases the achievements and scientific progress made by IHEC in core areas of current epigenetic investigations.

** For more information visit: http://www.intervalstudy.org.uk/

Participating Centres

For a full list of all 42 participating centres participating in BLUEPRINT, please see: http://www.blueprint-epigenome.eu/index.cfm?p=7D26EAFE-B366-DE94-6717271B880916E2

Selected Websites
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