Dr Milan Malinsky | Visiting Scientist

This person is a member of Sanger Institute Alumni.

Malinsky, Milan

Milan's research interests focus on population genomics, particularly on genetic variation contributing to evolution of novel traits, using African cichlid fishes as a model system. Milan is also involved in development of new methodologies for population genomics and for genome assembly. This work is supervised by Dr Richard Durbin at the Sanger Institute.

I was a PhD student at the Durbin group from September 2012 until September 2015, using whole genome sequence data to study the genetic variation underpinning an amazing array of phenotypic adaptations in hundreds of species of East African cichlid fishes. My PhD work, based on whole genomes of ~100 species from Lake Malawi, built the initial platform for the current Sanger project, with over 2000 specimens sequenced: https://www.sanger.ac.uk/science/projects/malawi-cichlid-genome-project. At the interface between micro- and macro-evolutionary studies, this work contributes to our understanding of how vertebrate genomes evolve and function.

I have also developed a new method for genome assembly to reduce difficulties caused by heterozygosity by taking advantage of mother-father-offspring trio data, and a method for population structure inference from RAD-seq data.

Publications

  • Whole-genome sequences of Malawi cichlids reveal multiple radiations interconnected by gene flow.

    Malinsky M, Svardal H, Tyers AM, Miska EA, Genner MJ et al.

    Nature ecology & evolution 2018;2;12;1940-1955

  • RADpainter and fineRADstructure: Population Inference from RADseq Data.

    Malinsky M, Trucchi E, Lawson DJ and Falush D

    Molecular biology and evolution 2018;35;5;1284-1290

  • Environmental context for understanding the iconic adaptive radiation of cichlid fishes in Lake Malawi.

    Malinsky M and Salzburger W

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2016;113;42;11654-11656

  • Genomic islands of speciation separate cichlid ecomorphs in an East African crater lake.

    Malinsky M, Challis RJ, Tyers AM, Schiffels S, Terai Y et al.

    Science (New York, N.Y.) 2015;350;6267;1493-1498

  • The genomic substrate for adaptive radiation in African cichlid fish.

    Brawand D, Wagner CE, Li YI, Malinsky M, Keller I et al.

    Nature 2014;513;7518;375-381

Career/Research Highlights

Malinsky, Milan
Milan's Timeline
2016

EMBO Fellowship at University of Basel, Switzerland

2015

Wellcome Trust PhD in Mathematical Genomics, University of Cambridge

2011

MPhil in Computational Biology, DAMTP, University of Cambridge

2010

BSc Computer Science, University of Birmingham, UK