News Archive

News Archive

Role models recognised for supporting women in science

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Role models recognised for supporting women in science

Eleftheria Zeggini of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Helen Parkinson of the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) have been recognised for their work in promoting gender equality on the Wellcome Genome Campus

Two staff members were recognised by Mike Stratton, Ewan Birney and Rolf Apweiler today, International Women’s Day (8 March) for their efforts in supporting women in science, in the third annual Wellcome Genome Campus Best Practice Award.

Latest genomic technology uncovers secrets of immune system's response to malaria

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Latest genomic technology uncovers secrets of immune system's response to malaria

Scientists reveal how mouse T cells develop

Scientists have revealed for the first time how immature mouse immune cells, called T cells, choose which type of skills they will develop to fight malaria infection. Reported in Science Immunology, researchers tracked individual T cells during infection with malaria parasites. They discovered a whole network of chemical conversations between different types of cells that influenced T cell specialisation.

Sanger parasite researcher recognised by British Parasitology Society

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Sanger parasite researcher recognised by British Parasitology Society

Dr Matthew Berriman awarded the 2017 CA Wright Medal for his leading role in understanding protozoan and helminthic parasites through genomics

Dr Berriman, a senior group leader within the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, has played a leading role in the sequencing of genomes from protozoan and helminthic parasites as well as the application of these data in the study of parasite biology, genetics, evolution and adaptation to parasitism. The award of the CA Wright Medal recognises the impact of Dr Berriman’s research in placing British parasitology at the forefront of international efforts to tackle the health burden attributed to parasitic disease.

Sanger Institute's COSMIC database expands cancer cloud capabilities at the Institute for Systems Biology

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Sanger Institute's COSMIC database expands cancer cloud capabilities at the Institute for Systems Biology

The Institute for Systems Biology has embedded the COSMIC data within their Cancer Genomics Cloud (CGC), which is a cloud-based platform that uses Google BigQuery technology to bring unprecedented computing power to researchers around the world

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute’s Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) team announces a new agreement to provide their data to the U.S.-based Institute for Systems Biology (ISB).

Sanger scientists win £20 million ‘Grand Challenge’ funding from Cancer Research UK

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Sanger scientists win £20 million ‘Grand Challenge’ funding from Cancer Research UK

Professor Sir Mike Stratton will lead an international team to help transform our understanding of what causes cancer

The first Cancer Research UK Grand Challenge Project seeks to fill in the missing gaps to identify unknown cancer-causing factors and reveal how they lead to cancer. To do this 5,000 pancreatic, kidney, oesophageal and bowel cancer patients, from five continents will be studied and compared.

Malaria vaccine target’s invasion partner uncovered

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Malaria vaccine target’s invasion partner uncovered

This could help develop a more effective malaria vaccine

Researchers discover how a promising malarial vaccine target - the protein RH5 - uses a previously mysterious protein P113 to create a bridge between the parasite and red blood cell.

Genes linked to malaria parasites’ ability to persist in the body

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Genes linked to malaria parasites’ ability to persist in the body

The ability of malaria parasites to persist in the body for years is linked to the expression of a set of genes from the pir gene family

Mouse study shows that as few as 1 in 10 of the parasites that initially appear in the blood express this set of pir genes. But almost all the parasites found persisting in the body at later times express the genes. If the biological mechanisms involved can be targeted, long-lasting persistent malaria infection could be prevented, and prevent ongoing transmission.

Largest genetic study of inflammatory bowel disease provides clues on new drug targets

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Largest genetic study of inflammatory bowel disease provides clues on new drug targets

Genetic variant identified that doubles an individual’s risk of developing ulcerative colitis

Researchers have identified ADCY7, a genetic variant that heightens the risk of developing ulcerative colitis, one of the subtypes of a chronic disorder known as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). They also uncover a further 25 novel genetic associations to IBD risk.

Genome secrets of elusive human malaria species revealed

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Genome secrets of elusive human malaria species revealed

Improved surveillance and diagnosis of rarer malaria parasites possible

The genomes of the two least common species of human malaria parasites are revealed today (25 January 2017) in Nature by a team of scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their international collaborators. These sequences will enable improved surveillance and diagnosis of these rarer parasites that still cause more than 10 million malaria cases every year.

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