News Archive

News Archive

International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium Announces "Working Draft" of Human Genome

International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium Announces "Working Draft" of Human Genome

The Human Genome Project public consortium today announced that it has assembled a working draft of the sequence of the human genome -- the genetic blueprint for a human being.

This major milestone involved two tasks: placing large fragments of DNA in the proper order to cover all of the human chromosomes, and determining the DNA sequence of these fragments.

The first draft of the Book of Humankind has been read

The first draft of the Book of Humankind has been read

The working draft of the genetic Book of Humankind has been read, the Wellcome Trust and the Sanger Centre in Cambridge, together with international partners, are announcing today. (June 26)

The work, carried out in 16 centres across the world, means that 85% of the human genome has been accurately deciphered. Further work, still to be finally checked, means in total 97% of the human genome has been read.

Human Genome Project may help find treatment for muscular dystrophy

Human Genome Project may help find treatment for muscular dystrophy

One of this country's most eminent geneticists is using results coming from the human genome project to help combat muscular and nervous system disorders. She hopes that the knowledge gained will enable drugs to be developed that will compensate for defects and effectively treat these devastating diseases ...

Professor Kay Davies is head of the Department of Human Anatomy and Human Genetics at the University of Oxford. One of the disorders her group is studying is Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), one of 20 different types of muscular dystrophy. The dystrophin gene is located on the X chromosome, which is present in duplicate in women and as a single copy in men. This means that boys who inherit the disease will do so from a mother who carries one copy of the defective gene.

Wellcome Trust Appoints New Sanger Centre Director

Wellcome Trust Appoints New Sanger Centre Director

The Wellcome Trust has announced the appointment of Professor Allan Bradley as the new director of the Sanger Centre, the UK's leading genome sequencing facility.

Dr Sulston indicated his wish to step down as Sanger Centre director in 1999 and as a result, an international scientific search committee was convened to find his successor. The new Director, Professor Bradley, will lead the Centre in the post genomics era when scientists will use the sequence data to gain a better understanding of how genes and proteins work in the body.

A collaboration between the Sanger Centre and the EBI adds critical annotation to sequence data from the Human Genome Project

A collaboration between the Sanger Centre and the EBI adds critical annotation to sequence data from the Human Genome Project

Today researchers at the Sanger Centre, a world-leading DNA sequencing centre, and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) announced that their joint bioinformatics project called Ensembl has now confirmed the location of the sequence of more than 35,000 genes on the human genome and has identified a further 150,000 potential gene fragments.

Ensembl is an automatic tool that adds critical information to sequence information as it is submitted to genome databases, enhancing the usefulness of this data to academia and industry. One effect will be to speed up the process of identifying new targets for drug development. The new tool can be found at http://www.ensembl.org/.

Public Consortium Launches Final Phase of Human Genome Sequencing: 85 percent of Human Genome Sequence Assembled and Available to the Public

Public Consortium Launches Final Phase of Human Genome Sequencing: 85 percent of Human Genome Sequence Assembled and Available to the Public

The milestone marks the transition from the initial phase of generating a 'working draft' of the human DNA to the final phase of producing the complete 'finished' sequence.

Sixteen genome centres around the world from the United States and Europe to Japan and China will officially begin Phase Two of the Human Genome Project tomorrow, May 9 2000.

Largest grant to study horse disease

Largest grant to study horse disease

A leading horse charity has teamed up with genome researchers in an effort to beat the equine disease strangles.

The Home of Rest for Horses, based in Buckinghamshire, has financed a £250,000 project to decode all the genes in the bacterium that causes strangles, Streptococcus equi. Hundreds of outbreaks of strangles occur each year in the UK and they are often difficult to control and individual cases can be difficult to treat.

Beowulf announces £3 million of new funding for pathogen sequencing

Beowulf announces £3 million of new funding for pathogen sequencing

The Wellcome Trust, via its Beowulf Genomics initiative, has committed more than £3 million to help scientists learn more about some of the causes of sleeping sickness, gastrointestinal infection and toxoplasmosis.

Researchers at the Sanger Centre, near Cambridge, will carry out sequencing work on the genomes of Trypanosoma brucei, Bacteroides fragilis, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Toxoplasma gondii.

The complete genome of the leprosy bacillus has been sequenced

The complete genome of the leprosy bacillus has been sequenced

The sequence of the entire genome of the bacillus causing leprosy has been determined in a collaborative effort between Stewart Cole's team at Institut Pasteur and the Sanger Centre in the Great Britain

Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease mostly affecting the skin, peripheral nerves, mucosa membranes of the upper respiratory tract and the eyes. The mutilations it causes result in lepers being rejected in many societies. Sequencing the genome of the leprosy bacillus ( Mycobacterium leprae) was a priority both for research into the disease and for its control.

Two-thirds of Human Genome Given to Researchers Worldwide

Two-thirds of Human Genome Given to Researchers Worldwide

Cambridge scientists are celebrating a monumental milestone in the international Human Genome Project to decode the genetic instructions of humankind.

The Sanger Centre team and their research colleagues from around the world have today announced that they have sequenced two billion 'letters' of human DNA. The sequence is deposited in public databases and is being used daily by researchers worldwide in the quest to understand human disease.

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