News Archive

News Archive

£3.9m project to support elimination of the world’s leading infectious cause of blindness

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£3.9m project to support elimination of the world’s leading infectious cause of blindness

A major new research project that aims to accelerate the elimination of trachoma has been launched

Stronger-SAFE is a £3.9m Wellcome Trust funded project that will increase our understanding of how trachoma is transmitted, and hopefully lead to the development and testing of new, more effective interventions and treatment approaches. Professor Nick Thomson, from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), is part of the team that are using new DNA sequencing approaches to better understand how this disease is spread.

25 species revealed for 25 Genomes Project

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25 species revealed for 25 Genomes Project

Blackberry to robin, bush cricket to brown trout - the 25 species all reside in the UK

To commemorate the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute turning 25 in 2018, the Institute and its collaborators are sequencing 25 new genomes of species in the UK. The final five species have now been chosen by thousands of school children and members of the public around the globe, who participated in the 25 Genomes Project online vote.

Takeda joins drug target discovery initiative

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Takeda joins drug target discovery initiative

Takeda will expand the skills and scientific background of Open Target's existing partners by bringing expertise in gastroenterology, central nervous system and oncology

Takeda is a global, research and development-driven pharmaceutical company with expertise in oncology, gastroenterology (GI) and central nervous system (CNS) disease that will complement the offerings of GSK, Biogen, the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), and build on the initiative’s success.

Largest genetic study of mosquitoes reveals spread of insecticide resistance across Africa

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Largest genetic study of mosquitoes reveals spread of insecticide resistance across Africa

Genetic resource will help develop new tools to support the campaign against malaria in Africa

The largest-ever genetic study of mosquitoes reveals the movement of insecticide resistance between different regions of Africa and finds several rapidly evolving insecticide resistance genes. Malaria is transmitted by mosquitoes and rising resistance to insecticides is hampering efforts to control the disease. Reported in Nature, this genetic resource will help to develop new tools for monitoring resistance and managing insecticide use, and for designing novel control methods.

Unforseen new drug target discovered for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)

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Unforseen new drug target discovered for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)

Scientists find that inhibiting the METTL3 gene destroys AML cells without harming non-cancerous blood cells

A study has found an unexpected new drug target for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) that could open new avenues to develop effective treatments against this potentially lethal disease. Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, the Gurdon Institute and their collaborators show that inhibiting the METTL3 gene destroys human and mouse AML cells without harming non-leukaemic blood cells.

Risk of cholera epidemics estimated with new rule book

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Risk of cholera epidemics estimated with new rule book

Researchers from across the world have studied cholera outbreaks in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean from the last 60 years

In two new studies focussing on Africa and Latin America, scientists analysed historical cholera samples to trace their transmission across the globe. They found that cholera repeatedly traveled out of south Asia to cause epidemics in Africa and Latin America.

25 new genomes to celebrate 25 years of the Sanger Institute

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25 new genomes to celebrate 25 years of the Sanger Institute

Blackberry to robin, bush cricket to brown trout - the 25 species all reside in the UK

To commemorate the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute turning 25 in 2018, the Institute and collaborators are sequencing 25 new genomes. From the blackberry to the robin, bush cricket to brown trout, all the species reside in the UK. Twenty species have already been decided, and the remaining five will be voted for by the public and school children.

Professor Sharon Peacock to be awarded the 2018 Microbiology Society Unilever Colworth Prize

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Professor Sharon Peacock to be awarded the 2018 Microbiology Society Unilever Colworth Prize

This Prize is awarded for significant contributions in the field of microbiology

Professor Peacock uses whole genome sequencing technology in public health, helping to increase the speed of outbreak analysis. She has been working with local hospitals and regional microbiology services to implement sequence-based approaches to clinical microbiology. Her latest study showed that routine genomic surveillance of MRSA can detect unsuspected outbreaks.

Study shows routine genomic surveillance of MRSA can detect unsuspected outbreaks

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Study shows routine genomic surveillance of MRSA can detect unsuspected outbreaks

Catching outbreaks early could prevent further spread and reduce the number of people involved

Genomic surveillance has revealed the first complete picture of MRSA spread across the east of England. By tracking all MRSA-positive people in the area, researchers saw the transmission within and between hospitals, and in GPs surgeries and communities. The study showed that routine genomic surveillance could catch outbreaks earlier, which could help prevent further transmission.

Five new malaria targets that could lead to an effective vaccine

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Five new malaria targets that could lead to an effective vaccine

Scientists have identified five targets that reduce the parasite’s ability to invade red blood cells

In the largest study of its kind, five new malaria vaccine targets have been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Researchers studied the malaria parasite at its most vulnerable stage – when invading human red blood cells – and identified five targets that lead to a reduction in the parasite’s ability to enter red blood cells.

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