News Archive

News Archive

New global health initiative for genomic surveillance of antimicrobial resistance funded by NIHR

Home_world_web.png

New global health initiative for genomic surveillance of antimicrobial resistance funded by NIHR

The Centre for Genomic Pathogen Surveillance to house the Global Health Research Unit to monitor antibiotic resistant bacteria around the globe

The NIHR funding will enable DNA sequencing and genomic surveillance of resistant bacteria through National laboratories in the Philippines, India, Nigeria and Colombia.

MRSA emerged years before methicillin was even discovered

Homepage_MRSA.jpg

MRSA emerged years before methicillin was even discovered

Study shows that Staphylococcus aureus acquired the mecA methicillin resistance gene in the mid-1940s

Researchers discovered that S. aureus acquired the gene that confers methicillin resistance 14 years before the first use of methicillin. They suggest that the widespread use of earlier antibiotics selected for resistant strains as the bacteria evolved.

Richard Durbin awarded the Royal Society’s Gabor Medal

RICHARD DURBIN (11).jpg

Richard Durbin awarded the Royal Society’s Gabor Medal

Award recognises more than 25 years of developing computational biology and genomic science

On 30 November 2017 Dr Durbin will receive the Gabor Medal, which acknowledges “distinction of interdisciplinary work between the life sciences with other disciplines”. For more than 25 years, he has developed leading-edge software tools and computational approaches that form the foundation of genomic and genetic analysis across the globe.

'Superbugs' study reveals complex picture of E. coli bloodstream infections

HOME2ecoli_bloodstream.png

'Superbugs' study reveals complex picture of E. coli bloodstream infections

Genetic study of E. coli showed that drug resistant ‘superbugs’ don't always out-compete other strains.

Research by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators showed that new types of E. coli occur frequently, but unlike in some other infections, drug-resistant strains do not become a dominant cause of infection.

Largest study of malaria gene function reveals a finely tuned genome full of potential drug targets

BODYpbergheigenes.png

Largest study of malaria gene function reveals a finely tuned genome full of potential drug targets

Scientists discover that two thirds of the malaria parasite’s genes studied are essential for growth, meaning there are many more drug targets than previously thought

The malaria parasite’s success is owed to the stripping down of its genome to the bare essential genes, scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have found. In the first ever large-scale study of malaria gene function, scientists analysed more than half of the genes in the parasite’s genome and found that two thirds of these genes were essential for survival – the largest proportion of essential genes found in any organism studied to date.

Malaria parasites able to sense their host's calorie intake

Homepage_Pfalciparum_blood.jpg

Malaria parasites able to sense their host's calorie intake

Scientists have found that the odds of dying with a malaria infection are lower when the host eats lower amounts of food

A new study has shown that the Plasmodium parasite is able to sense and actively adapt to the host’s nutritional status. Using mouse models of malaria infection, scientists from Instituto de Medicina Molecular in Lisbon (iMM Lisboa) and from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute found that mice who ate 30 per cent fewer calories had a significantly lower parasite load.

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute responds to the Chief Medical Officer's annual report 2016: Generation Genome

teaser.jpg

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute responds to the Chief Medical Officer's annual report 2016: Generation Genome

The UK Chief Medical Officer's report has highlighted the key role genomics and genetics will play in future healthcare provision. Associate director Dr Julia Wilson and honorary faculty member Professor Sharon Peacock comment

On 4 July 2017, Professor Dame Sally Davies published her Chief Medical Officer's annual report 2016: Generation Genome, which detailed the pivotal role genomic and genetic research will play in driving forward future healthcare provision and personalised medicine. Associate director of the Sanger Institute, Dr Julia Wilson, and honorary faculty member Sharon Peacock respond and explore the issues involved.

Artificial bile ducts successfully grown in lab and transplanted into mice could help treat liver disease in children

Vallier_Homepage.jpg

Artificial bile ducts successfully grown in lab and transplanted into mice could help treat liver disease in children

New method opens the way to develop future treatments and reduce the need for liver transplants

Cambridge scientists have developed a new method for growing and transplanting artificial bile ducts that could in future be used to help treat liver disease in children, reducing the need for liver transplantation. In research published in the journal Nature Medicine, the researchers grew 3D cellular structure which, once transplanted into mice, developed into normal, functioning bile ducts.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Scientists zoom in on genetic culprits 

ibdzoomhome.png

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Scientists zoom in on genetic culprits 

Scientists produced a high-resolution map to investigate which genetic variants have a causal role in the disease

Scientists have closed in on specific genes responsible for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) from a list of over 600 genes that were suspects for the disease. The team from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the GIGA Institute of the University of Liège combined efforts to produce a high-resolution map to investigate which genetic variants have a causal role in the disease.

Professor Eleftheria Zeggini honoured as Young Scientist by World Economic Forum

eletop.jpg

Professor Eleftheria Zeggini honoured as Young Scientist by World Economic Forum

Professor Eleftheria Zeggini, Group Leader in the Human Genetics programme, has been recognised by the World Economic Forum for her contributions to science

Professor Eleftheria Zeggini is one of 55 extraordinary young scientists from 18 countries worldwide to be recognised by the World Economic Forum (WEF) for their work towards advancing the frontiers of science, engineering and technology. The WEF Young Scientists community brings together the young scientific minds in the world who play an active role in integrating scientific knowledge into society.

Pages