News Archive

News Archive

Thermo Fisher Scientific and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Announce the Axiom Africa Array for Medical and Population Genomics

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Thermo Fisher Scientific and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Announce the Axiom Africa Array for Medical and Population Genomics

The array tags at least 90 per cent of common genetic variation in 12 diverse African populations

The AGR whole-genome sequencing effort encompassed populations from across Africa, including from Ethiopia (Gumuz, Wolayta, Amhara, Oromo, Somali), Egypt, Namibia (Nama/Khoesan) and South Africa (Zulu). The genomes of 2,000 individuals from Uganda (Baganda, Banyarwanda, Barundi and others) were also included. The AGR resource now contains 94.5M SNPs of which 21.7M are unique to AGR.

1 to 10 mutations are needed to drive cancer, scientists find

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1 to 10 mutations are needed to drive cancer, scientists find

The results show the number of mutations driving cancer varies considerably across different cancer types

For the first time, scientists have provided unbiased estimates of the number of mutations needed for cancers to develop, in a study of more than 7,500 tumours across 29 cancer types. Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators adapted a technique from the field of evolution to confirm that, on average, 1 to 10 driver mutations are needed for cancer to emerge. The results are published today (19th October) in Cell.

The international Human Cell Atlas publishes strategic blueprint; announces data from first one million cells

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The international Human Cell Atlas publishes strategic blueprint; announces data from first one million cells

Blueprint describes path forward for cataloging every cell in the human body; cell data release to be available to research community

The Human Cell Atlas (HCA) Consortium has released a blueprint for the international initiative’s efforts to create a comprehensive reference map of all human cells, a project that will form the basis for a deeper understanding of human health and for diagnosing, monitoring, and treating disease.

Yeast spotlights genetic variation’s link to drug resistance

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Yeast spotlights genetic variation’s link to drug resistance

Study shows that genetic diversity influences which adaptive mutations cause antimicrobial resistance

Researchers have shown that high genetic diversity plays a key role in the evolution of drug resistance, by priming new mutations. The study could help scientists understand the evolution of resistance to antimicrobial and anticancer drugs.

Genomics reveals how competition between bacteria affects the impact of vaccination

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Genomics reveals how competition between bacteria affects the impact of vaccination

Study identifies the consequences of fierce competition between bacterial strains surviving after vaccine introduction.

After a few years of routine use of the two vaccines many strains of S. pneumoniae, including the most prevalent disease-causing ones, had been eliminated. Yet, the bacteria has not become less common, instead the vaccine-targeted strains had been replaced by others that less frequently cause disease in children. The latest research, published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, provides a new explanation for how this may occur.

Helping apprentices lead the field in big data

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Helping apprentices lead the field in big data

Anglia Ruskin and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute team up to deliver new training

Anglia Ruskin University and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have received funding to launch a new degree apprenticeship to help address the acute shortage of skilled professionals in a big data sector which is growing by 56,000 jobs a year.

New drug hope for patients with rare bone cancer

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New drug hope for patients with rare bone cancer

Patients with a rare bone cancer of the skull and spine – chordoma – could be helped by existing PI3K inhibitor drugs, researchers suggest

Patients with a rare bone cancer of the skull and spine – chordoma – could be helped by existing drugs, suggest scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, University College London Cancer Institute and the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust. In the largest genomics study of chordoma to date, published today (12 October) in Nature Communications, scientists show that a group of chordoma patients have mutations in genes that are the target of existing drugs, known as PI3K inhibitors.

New type of stem cell line produced offers expanded potential for research and treatments

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New type of stem cell line produced offers expanded potential for research and treatments

Scientists have created Expanded Potential Stem Cells (EPSCs) that, for the first time, can produce all three types of blastocyst stem cells - embryo, placenta and yolk sac

Published in Nature, researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators explain how they created Expanded Potential Stem Cells (EPSCs) in mice, for the first time. These cells have the features of the very first cells in the developing embryo and can develop into any type of cell, which current stem cell lines cannot.

UK students working with scientists to help prevent childhood parasite infection

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UK students working with scientists to help prevent childhood parasite infection

Genome Decoders, a UK-wide schools project to help solve a global parasite problem by decoding the whipworm genome, has launched

In this exciting collaboration, students from 60 schools in the UK will work with scientists to find and identify all the genes in the DNA of a global parasite, the human whipworm. The information from the huge Genome Decoders Project will help researchers understand the biology of the parasite, and aid the development of vaccines or treatments.

Genome editing reveals role of gene important for human embryo development

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Genome editing reveals role of gene important for human embryo development

CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing shows that the protein OCT4 is essential in very early days of human embryo development

The research was published in Nature and is the first time that genome editing has been used to study gene function in human embryos, which could help scientists to better understand the biology of our early development.

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