News Archive

News Archive

Huge genetic diversity among Papuan New Guinean peoples revealed

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Huge genetic diversity among Papuan New Guinean peoples revealed

Genetic diversity found to mirror linguistic and cultural diversity among Papuan New Guinean people

The first large-scale genetic study of people in Papua New Guinea has shown that different groups within the country are genetically highly different from each other. Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their colleagues reveal that the people there have remained genetically independent from Europe and Asia for most of the last 50,000 years, and that people from the country’s isolated highlands region have been completely independent even until the present day.

Immunotherapy treatment option for selected breast cancer patients, genetic study suggests

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Immunotherapy treatment option for selected breast cancer patients, genetic study suggests

Opens up the possibility of another therapy option for approximately 1,000 breast cancer patients in the UK

Immunotherapy drugs could help some breast cancer patients based on the genetic changes in their tumours, researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators find. Published today (13 September 2017) in Cancer Research, scientists identify particular genetic changes in a DNA repair mechanism in breast cancer.

Type 2 diabetes is being misdiagnosed in African Americans, genetic study suggests

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Type 2 diabetes is being misdiagnosed in African Americans, genetic study suggests

Around 650,000 African Americans in the US have a unique genetic variant that significantly reduces the accuracy of the HbA1c blood test, meaning they could have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes

One of the tests used to diagnose type 2 diabetes and monitor blood sugar control is influenced by 60 genetic variants, an international team of scientists, including those from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, has found. One genetic variant in particular, found only in African Americans, significantly reduces the accuracy of the HbA1c blood test used to diagnose and monitor the condition. This means around 650,000 African Americans in the US could have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes if tested with the HbA1c test alone.

The Brain Tumour Charity grants WINDOW Consortium £1.5 million for new research into combination therapies to treat brain cancer

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The Brain Tumour Charity grants WINDOW Consortium £1.5 million for new research into combination therapies to treat brain cancer

The Dutch/British consortium will study glioblastoma

This unique collaboration will establish an international scientific network to generate more effective combination therapies against this deadly cancer, which has so far proved intransigent to any treatment. WINDOW will test many drug combinations to target different cells within each individual patient's tumour.

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute responds to the Life Sciences Industrial Strategy

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The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute responds to the Life Sciences Industrial Strategy

The Life Sciences Industrial Strategy recognises the key role genomics and genetics will play in future healthcare provision

The report, written by Life Science’s Champion Professor Sir John Bell, provides recommendations to government on the long-term success of the life sciences sector. Associate Director Julia Wilson gives Sanger's response.

Bowel cancer study reveals impact of mutations on protein networks

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Bowel cancer study reveals impact of mutations on protein networks

The results offer clearer picture of the cellular processes behind bowel cancer, and may enable future tailoring of drug treatments to different bowel cancer patients

In the new study, scientists conducted a very deep, detailed study of the proteins in bowel cancer to investigate whether proteins play a role in predicting the effect of different drugs against the cancer. The researchers analysed 9,000 proteins for each of 50 bowel cancer cell lines.

New genetic analysis reveals late spread of breast cancer and backs key role of early diagnosis

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New genetic analysis reveals late spread of breast cancer and backs key role of early diagnosis

These results show that catching and treating breast cancer before it spreads is a realistic goal

Early detection of breast cancer is key, as catching and treating the cancer before it spreads is now a realistic goal following a new study. Scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators found that breast cancer cells that spread to other parts of the body break off and leave the primary tumour later than previously thought. The results also open the door to predicting which drugs will work against breast cancer that has already spread.

Mystery epidemic that crossed species in Iceland is solved

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Mystery epidemic that crossed species in Iceland is solved

Scientists have identified and tracked the bacteria that caused an epidemic respiratory disease in Iceland’s native horse population

The bacteria behind a nationwide epidemic of a mysterious respiratory disease in Icelandic ponies has been identified by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. The team tracked the bug back to its source: a water treadmill used by horses in rehabilitation.

Present-day Lebanese descend from Biblical Canaanites, genetic study suggests

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Present-day Lebanese descend from Biblical Canaanites, genetic study suggests

Scientists sequenced the genomes of 4,000-year-old Canaanite individuals and compared these to other ancient and present-day populations

In the most recent whole-genome study of ancient remains from the Near East, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute scientists and their collaborators sequenced the entire genomes of 4,000-year-old Canaanite individuals who inhabited the region during the Bronze Age, and compared these to other ancient and present-day populations. The results, published today (27 July) in the American Journal of Human Genetics suggest that present-day Lebanese are direct descendants of the ancient Canaanites.

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