News Archive

News Archive

Risk of cholera epidemics estimated with new rule book

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Risk of cholera epidemics estimated with new rule book

Researchers from across the world have studied cholera outbreaks in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean from the last 60 years

In two new studies focussing on Africa and Latin America, scientists analysed historical cholera samples to trace their transmission across the globe. They found that cholera repeatedly traveled out of south Asia to cause epidemics in Africa and Latin America.

25 new genomes to celebrate 25 years of the Sanger Institute

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25 new genomes to celebrate 25 years of the Sanger Institute

Blackberry to robin, bush cricket to brown trout - the 25 species all reside in the UK

To commemorate the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute turning 25 in 2018, the Institute and collaborators are sequencing 25 new genomes. From the blackberry to the robin, bush cricket to brown trout, all the species reside in the UK. Twenty species have already been decided, and the remaining five will be voted for by the public and school children.

Professor Sharon Peacock to be awarded the 2018 Microbiology Society Unilever Colworth Prize

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Professor Sharon Peacock to be awarded the 2018 Microbiology Society Unilever Colworth Prize

This Prize is awarded for significant contributions in the field of microbiology

Professor Peacock uses whole genome sequencing technology in public health, helping to increase the speed of outbreak analysis. She has been working with local hospitals and regional microbiology services to implement sequence-based approaches to clinical microbiology. Her latest study showed that routine genomic surveillance of MRSA can detect unsuspected outbreaks.

Study shows routine genomic surveillance of MRSA can detect unsuspected outbreaks

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Study shows routine genomic surveillance of MRSA can detect unsuspected outbreaks

Catching outbreaks early could prevent further spread and reduce the number of people involved

Genomic surveillance has revealed the first complete picture of MRSA spread across the east of England. By tracking all MRSA-positive people in the area, researchers saw the transmission within and between hospitals, and in GPs surgeries and communities. The study showed that routine genomic surveillance could catch outbreaks earlier, which could help prevent further transmission.

Five new malaria targets that could lead to an effective vaccine

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Five new malaria targets that could lead to an effective vaccine

Scientists have identified five targets that reduce the parasite’s ability to invade red blood cells

In the largest study of its kind, five new malaria vaccine targets have been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Researchers studied the malaria parasite at its most vulnerable stage – when invading human red blood cells – and identified five targets that lead to a reduction in the parasite’s ability to enter red blood cells.

Thermo Fisher Scientific and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Announce the Axiom Africa Array for Medical and Population Genomics

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Thermo Fisher Scientific and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Announce the Axiom Africa Array for Medical and Population Genomics

The array tags at least 90 per cent of common genetic variation in 12 diverse African populations

The AGR whole-genome sequencing effort encompassed populations from across Africa, including from Ethiopia (Gumuz, Wolayta, Amhara, Oromo, Somali), Egypt, Namibia (Nama/Khoesan) and South Africa (Zulu). The genomes of 2,000 individuals from Uganda (Baganda, Banyarwanda, Barundi and others) were also included. The AGR resource now contains 94.5M SNPs of which 21.7M are unique to AGR.

1 to 10 mutations are needed to drive cancer, scientists find

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1 to 10 mutations are needed to drive cancer, scientists find

The results show the number of mutations driving cancer varies considerably across different cancer types

For the first time, scientists have provided unbiased estimates of the number of mutations needed for cancers to develop, in a study of more than 7,500 tumours across 29 cancer types. Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators adapted a technique from the field of evolution to confirm that, on average, 1 to 10 driver mutations are needed for cancer to emerge. The results are published today (19th October) in Cell.

The international Human Cell Atlas publishes strategic blueprint; announces data from first one million cells

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The international Human Cell Atlas publishes strategic blueprint; announces data from first one million cells

Blueprint describes path forward for cataloging every cell in the human body; cell data release to be available to research community

The Human Cell Atlas (HCA) Consortium has released a blueprint for the international initiative’s efforts to create a comprehensive reference map of all human cells, a project that will form the basis for a deeper understanding of human health and for diagnosing, monitoring, and treating disease.

Yeast spotlights genetic variation’s link to drug resistance

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Yeast spotlights genetic variation’s link to drug resistance

Study shows that genetic diversity influences which adaptive mutations cause antimicrobial resistance

Researchers have shown that high genetic diversity plays a key role in the evolution of drug resistance, by priming new mutations. The study could help scientists understand the evolution of resistance to antimicrobial and anticancer drugs.

Genomics reveals how competition between bacteria affects the impact of vaccination

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Genomics reveals how competition between bacteria affects the impact of vaccination

Study identifies the consequences of fierce competition between bacterial strains surviving after vaccine introduction.

After a few years of routine use of the two vaccines many strains of S. pneumoniae, including the most prevalent disease-causing ones, had been eliminated. Yet, the bacteria has not become less common, instead the vaccine-targeted strains had been replaced by others that less frequently cause disease in children. The latest research, published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, provides a new explanation for how this may occur.

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