News Archive

News Archive

New Sanger Institute Human Cell Atlas projects funded by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative DAF, an advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation

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New Sanger Institute Human Cell Atlas projects funded by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative DAF, an advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation

Projects will build computational tools to support the global Human Cell Atlas initiative to map every cell type in the body

Martin Hemberg and Kerstin Meyer are recipients of three of the latest grants from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative DAF, an advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation. These projects will help to build tools and technologies to support the Human Cell Atlas, a global effort to map every type of cell in the healthy human body.

Advance access to data: Researchers post genetic profiles of human and mouse cells on Human Cell Atlas online portal before publication

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Advance access to data: Researchers post genetic profiles of human and mouse cells on Human Cell Atlas online portal before publication

Prior to publishing their results, researchers compile and make raw data openly accessible on the preview version of the HCA Data Coordination Platform

Data sets of human and mouse cells have been made openly accessible on a preview site for the Human Cell Atlas initiative. The data sets are a valuable resource for the broader scientific community as they can can reveal basic biology, provide a reference for studying disease, and allow computational biologists to test new analysis tools.

First seeds of kidney cancer sown in adolescence

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First seeds of kidney cancer sown in adolescence

Insights from this study present an opportunity to develop approaches for early detection and early intervention in kidney cancer

The earliest critical genetic changes that can lead to kidney cancer have been mapped by scientists. The first key genetic change occurs in childhood or adolescence, and the resulting cells follow a consistent path to progress into kidney cancer four or five decades later, scientists have found.

Single cell technology and organoids reveal every bowel tumour and bowel cancer cell have unique genetic fingerprints

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Single cell technology and organoids reveal every bowel tumour and bowel cancer cell have unique genetic fingerprints

Study could help researchers target cancer-specific processes for cancer prevention or to develop treatments

New research on bowel cancer has shown that every tumour is different, and that every cell within the tumour is genetically unique. In the first study of its kind, researchers used the latest single cell and organoid technologies to understand the mutational processes of the disease. This study could help researchers target cancer-specific processes for prevention or treatment.

20 year-old mystery of malaria vaccine target solved

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20 year-old mystery of malaria vaccine target solved

Discovery of human receptor for TRAP protein could help improve development of an effective malaria vaccine

A long-standing mystery of how the high-priority malaria vaccine target TRAP interacts with human host cells has been solved. Wellcome Sanger Institute scientists have discovered a receptor protein on the surface of human cells that the malarial TRAP protein interacts with as it navigates through the body. This could help improve the development of an effective malaria vaccine.

Whole genome sequencing will ‘transform the research landscape for a wide range of diseases’

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Whole genome sequencing will ‘transform the research landscape for a wide range of diseases’

UK Biobank enters exciting new phase of genetics research

UK Biobank announces today (6 April) a major initiative to sequence the full genomes of 50,000 UK Biobank volunteer participants. Funded by a £30M grant from the Medical Research Council (MRC), sequencing of the whole genome will be undertaken during 2018 and 2019 by the Wellcome Sanger Institute. With the ultimate goal to sequence all 500,000 UK Biobank participants, the investment will help establish the world’s most detailed whole genome database – and further accelerate research into a wide range of diseases that cause disability and premature death in mid to later life.

Malaria Cell Atlas launched: Parasite development mapped in unprecedented detail

Malaria Cell Atlas launched: Parasite development mapped in unprecedented detail

Malaria Cell Atlas launched: Parasite development mapped in unprecedented detail

The Malaria Cell Atlas will allow researchers to identify weak points in the parasite’s lifecycle for intervention with drugs

New single-cell technology has allowed scientists to study malaria parasites at the highest resolution to date. By investigating the genes in individual malaria parasites, scientists are beginning to understand the genetic processes each parasite undergoes as it moves through its complicated lifecycle. The results are the first step towards developing the Malaria Cell Atlas, a data resource will allow researchers to identify weak points in the parasite’s lifecycle for intervention with drugs.

New online course launched to help doctors and nurses better understand how genomics can battle bacterial diseases

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New online course launched to help doctors and nurses better understand how genomics can battle bacterial diseases

Free three week course on Bacterial Genomes: Disease Outbreaks and Antimicrobial Resistance starts on April 30th

Wellcome Genome Campus Advanced Courses and Scientific Conferences (ACSC) today (Tuesday 27 March) announces the launch of its first online course, in partnership with FutureLearn, the leading social learning platform. The free online course introduces the genomics of disease-causing bacteria, such as MRSA, E. coli and Chlamydia which infect millions of people every year, and is open to anyone for enrolment now, with the course starting on April 30th 2018.

NUCLEUS project welcomes new consortium member: Wellcome Genome Campus in Cambridge

NUCLEUS Project group meeting - part of Horizon 2020

NUCLEUS project welcomes new consortium member: Wellcome Genome Campus in Cambridge

The ambitious HORIZON 2020 NUCLEUS project has been further strengthened by the joining of the Wellcome Genome Campus in Cambridge, UK as the 25th member of the consortium

A principal contribution of the Wellcome Genome Campus will be to offer coordination and support for three Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) test beds called ‘Embedded Nuclei’. Dr Ken Skeldon, Head of Wellcome Genome Campus Public Engagement, based within Connecting Science, will lead the mentorship of these three research institutions, two of which are in Germany with the other in China.

Sanger Institute opens up its life sciences leadership development courses

Management & Leadership Development Programmes. The Sanger Institute's Scientific Education & Excellence Development (SEED) scheme is designed for research and life sciences organisations looking to develop their leadership potential

Sanger Institute opens up its life sciences leadership development courses

Five bespoke courses tailored to the needs of leaders at all levels, from new supervisors to established managers, are being offered to the scientific community

Sanger’s Scientific Education and Excellence Development (SEED) Scheme offers five leadership development programmes to enable leaders across the life sciences industry to take their leadership skills to the next level. Through interactive training sessions, feedback and personality profiling, participants will have the opportunity to build meaningful networks, share best practice ideas and develop behaviours that will drive their own success and that of their teams.

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