News Archive

News Archive

Existing drugs could benefit patients with bone cancer, genetic study suggests

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Existing drugs could benefit patients with bone cancer, genetic study suggests

New research suggests a subset of bone cancer patients are likely to respond to IGF1R inhibitors based on their genetic profile

A subgroup of patients with osteosarcoma – a form of bone cancer – could be helped by an existing drug, suggest scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. In the largest genetic sequencing study of osteosarcoma to date, scientists discovered that 10 per cent of patients with a genetic mutation in particular growth factor signalling genes may benefit from existing drugs, known as IGF1R inhibitors.

Babies' DNA affects mothers' risk of pre-eclampsia in pregnancy

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Babies' DNA affects mothers' risk of pre-eclampsia in pregnancy

Strong evidence found for a number of genetic variations near to the FLT1 gene being linked to increased risk of pre-eclampsia

A major new international study from InterPregGen has revealed, for the first time, that some features in a baby’s DNA can increase the risk of its mother developing pre-eclampsia – a potentially dangerous condition in pregnancy. The five-year study explored the genetic make-up of 4,380 babies born from pre-eclamptic pregnancies and compared their DNA with over 300,000 healthy individuals.

Hidden lives revealed in a new exhibition at the Wellcome Genome Campus

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Hidden lives revealed in a new exhibition at the Wellcome Genome Campus

The Hidden Lives exhibition offers an exciting insight into the lives and origins of our East Anglian ancestors, greatly enriched from the insight afforded through genomic technology.

Hidden Lives: a story of discovery, the latest exhibition at the Wellcome Genome Campus in Hinxton opens this week (Monday 12 June 2017). Combining archaeology with cutting-edge genomics research, the display unearths the secrets of some very early South Cambridgeshire residents.

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative supports Human Cell Atlas data platform

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Chan Zuckerberg Initiative supports Human Cell Atlas data platform

The Data Coordination Platform will check, share and analyse the vast amounts of diverse information generated

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) has announced financial and engineering support for the Human Cell Atlas, an ambitious international collaboration led by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the Broad Institute, which is using sequencing technology to redefine every cell in the body. Support from CZI will enable the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), the Broad Institute and the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) to set up an open, cloud-based Data Coordination Platform to check, share and analyse the vast amounts of diverse information generated in the initiative. 

Isolated Greek villages reveal genetic secrets that protect against heart disease

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Isolated Greek villages reveal genetic secrets that protect against heart disease

A genetic variant that protects the heart against cardiovascular disease has been discovered by researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators.

The variant, rs145556679*, was associated with lower levels of both ‘bad’ natural fats – triglycerides – and ‘bad’ cholesterol – very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL). This cardioprotective variant may be almost unique to the Mylopotamos population.

Natural resistance to malaria linked to variation in human red blood cell receptors

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Natural resistance to malaria linked to variation in human red blood cell receptors

First study to identify protective effect of glycophorin gene rearrangements on malaria

Researchers have discovered that protection from the most severe form of malaria is linked with natural variation in human red blood cell genes. A study from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics and their collaborators has identified a genetic rearrangement of red blood cell glycophorin receptors that confers a 40 per cent reduced risk from severe malaria.  Published in Science, this opens a new avenue of research for malarial therapeutics.

Scientists unveil the UK’s largest resource of human stem cells from healthy donors

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Scientists unveil the UK’s largest resource of human stem cells from healthy donors

Powerful resource created for scientists studying human development and disease

Reported in Nature, one of the largest sets of high-quality human induced pluripotent stem cell lines from healthy individuals has been produced by a consortium involving the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.  Comprehensively annotated and available for independent research, the hundreds of stem cell lines are a powerful resource for scientists studying human development and disease.

Cancer drug design targeted by COSMIC's new 3D system

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Cancer drug design targeted by COSMIC's new 3D system

Collaboration between Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Astex Pharmaceuticals brings together COSMIC (Catalogue of Somatic Mutations In Cancer) and wwPDB (worldwide Protein Data Bank) to visualise genomic and proteomic data on cancer mutations

COSMIC-3D, the most comprehensive system for exploring cancer mutations in three dimensions, is launched today by COSMIC, based at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, in collaboration with Astex Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, UK. With extensive colourful and helpful visualisations, the new resource can help identify and characterise drug targets as well as support the design of new therapeutics for cancer.

Dr Matt Hurles elected to the Academy of Medical Sciences

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Dr Matt Hurles elected to the Academy of Medical Sciences

Head of the Human Genetics Programme recognised with prestigious Fellowship

Dr Matt Hurles, Head of the Human Genetics Programme at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is one of 46 world-leading scientists being honoured for their outstanding contribution to medical science by the Academy of Medical Sciences. Matt joins more than 1,100 existing Fellows whose innovative research has advanced understanding of health and disease and has been translated into benefits for society.

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