News Archive

News Archive

Major funding for Cambridge to transform health through data science

HDRUK

Major funding for Cambridge to transform health through data science

Cambridge is amongst six sites across the UK to be awarded a total of £30M funding by Health Data Research UK, to address challenging healthcare issues through use of data science.

Each of the six sites already work in close partnership with NHS bodies and the public to translate research findings into benefits for patients and populations. From April this year, the sites will work collaboratively as foundation partners in Health Data Research UK to make game-changing improvements in people’s health by harnessing data science at scale across the UK.

Is food love-hate coded in your DNA?

foodlovehate.jpg

Is food love-hate coded in your DNA?

This Valentine’s special is the first of an exciting new programme of monthly Café Sci events in Cambridge

Can your DNA say if you love or hate Marmite, or prefer a Malbec over Merlot? Genetic testing is hitting the mainstream, but what can your DNA actually reveal about you? Join us on Valentine’s night for the first event of a lively new series of Café Sci to find out more about the real science truths, and discuss how you think genetic data should be used.

Multidrug resistant malaria spread under the radar for years in Cambodia

photo_credit_Chanaki_Amaratunga.jpg

Multidrug resistant malaria spread under the radar for years in Cambodia

Study suggests that ongoing genomic surveillance is vital to inform malaria control strategies

The most comprehensive genetic study of malaria parasites in Southeast Asia has shown that resistance to antimalarial drugs was under-reported for years in Cambodia. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators have shown that the parasites developed multidrug resistance to first-line treatments extremely rapidly.

Sarah Teichmann awarded the Genetics Society’s 2018 Mary Lyon Medal

sarah.jpg

Sarah Teichmann awarded the Genetics Society’s 2018 Mary Lyon Medal

Award recognises Dr Teichmann’s “outstanding research” in understanding how the immune system works by using genomics and bioinformatics approaches

Wellcome Sanger Institute Group Leader Dr Sarah Teichmann has received the prestigious Mary Lyon Medal 2018. This annual recognition, named after the distinguished geneticist Mary Lyon FRS, rewards outstanding research in genetics by scientists who are in the middle of their research career. As part of the award, Sarah has been invited to present a lecture at one of the Genetics Society’s scientific meetings.

Hidden genetic effects behind immune diseases may be missed, study suggests

macrophages_hompage2.jpg

Hidden genetic effects behind immune diseases may be missed, study suggests

For the first time immune cells created from human induced pluripotent stem cells (HiPSCs) have been used to model immune response variation between people

The role of genetics in the risk of having an immune disease could be missed in research, scientists suggest. Using a combination of stem cells and novel analytical tools, scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators discovered that clues to the contribution of genetic variation to disease risk lie not only in the genes, but also in the molecular switches that control those genes.

BioBright, Sanger Institute aim to cut drug-development time

Gosia Trynka (left) and Charles Fracchia, BioBright CEO, are employing BioBright tools in Trynka’s lab at the Wellcome Sanger Institute

BioBright, Sanger Institute aim to cut drug-development time

Collaboration promises better, more reproducible biomedical data

BioBright, a firm dedicated to creating the smart laboratory of the future, has announced a collaboration with the Wellcome Sanger Institute that could lead to the faster development of drugs for diseases of the immune system like rheumatoid arthritis.

£3.9m project to support elimination of the world’s leading infectious cause of blindness

archivelist.png

£3.9m project to support elimination of the world’s leading infectious cause of blindness

A major new research project that aims to accelerate the elimination of trachoma has been launched

Stronger-SAFE is a £3.9m Wellcome Trust funded project that will increase our understanding of how trachoma is transmitted, and hopefully lead to the development and testing of new, more effective interventions and treatment approaches. Professor Nick Thomson, from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), is part of the team that are using new DNA sequencing approaches to better understand how this disease is spread.

25 species revealed for 25 Genomes Project

25_squirrel_news.png

25 species revealed for 25 Genomes Project

Blackberry to robin, bush cricket to brown trout - the 25 species all reside in the UK

To commemorate the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute turning 25 in 2018, the Institute and its collaborators are sequencing 25 new genomes of species in the UK. The final five species have now been chosen by thousands of school children and members of the public around the globe, who participated in the 25 Genomes Project online vote.

Takeda joins drug target discovery initiative

opentargetslogos.jpg

Takeda joins drug target discovery initiative

Takeda will expand the skills and scientific background of Open Target's existing partners by bringing expertise in gastroenterology, central nervous system and oncology

Takeda is a global, research and development-driven pharmaceutical company with expertise in oncology, gastroenterology (GI) and central nervous system (CNS) disease that will complement the offerings of GSK, Biogen, the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), and build on the initiative’s success.

Largest genetic study of mosquitoes reveals spread of insecticide resistance across Africa

Mosquitoes in flight at night in Africa

Largest genetic study of mosquitoes reveals spread of insecticide resistance across Africa

Genetic resource will help develop new tools to support the campaign against malaria in Africa

The largest-ever genetic study of mosquitoes reveals the movement of insecticide resistance between different regions of Africa and finds several rapidly evolving insecticide resistance genes. Malaria is transmitted by mosquitoes and rising resistance to insecticides is hampering efforts to control the disease. Reported in Nature, this genetic resource will help to develop new tools for monitoring resistance and managing insecticide use, and for designing novel control methods.

Pages