News Archive

News Archive

Helping apprentices lead the field in big data

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Helping apprentices lead the field in big data

Anglia Ruskin and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute team up to deliver new training

Anglia Ruskin University and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have received funding to launch a new degree apprenticeship to help address the acute shortage of skilled professionals in a big data sector which is growing by 56,000 jobs a year.

New drug hope for patients with rare bone cancer

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New drug hope for patients with rare bone cancer

Patients with a rare bone cancer of the skull and spine – chordoma – could be helped by existing PI3K inhibitor drugs, researchers suggest

Patients with a rare bone cancer of the skull and spine – chordoma – could be helped by existing drugs, suggest scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, University College London Cancer Institute and the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust. In the largest genomics study of chordoma to date, published today (12 October) in Nature Communications, scientists show that a group of chordoma patients have mutations in genes that are the target of existing drugs, known as PI3K inhibitors.

New type of stem cell line produced offers expanded potential for research and treatments

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New type of stem cell line produced offers expanded potential for research and treatments

Scientists have created Expanded Potential Stem Cells (EPSCs) that, for the first time, can produce all three types of blastocyst stem cells - embryo, placenta and yolk sac

Published in Nature, researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators explain how they created Expanded Potential Stem Cells (EPSCs) in mice, for the first time. These cells have the features of the very first cells in the developing embryo and can develop into any type of cell, which current stem cell lines cannot.

UK students working with scientists to help prevent childhood parasite infection

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UK students working with scientists to help prevent childhood parasite infection

Genome Decoders, a UK-wide schools project to help solve a global parasite problem by decoding the whipworm genome, has launched

In this exciting collaboration, students from 60 schools in the UK will work with scientists to find and identify all the genes in the DNA of a global parasite, the human whipworm. The information from the huge Genome Decoders Project will help researchers understand the biology of the parasite, and aid the development of vaccines or treatments.

Genome editing reveals role of gene important for human embryo development

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Genome editing reveals role of gene important for human embryo development

CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing shows that the protein OCT4 is essential in very early days of human embryo development

The research was published in Nature and is the first time that genome editing has been used to study gene function in human embryos, which could help scientists to better understand the biology of our early development.

Huge genetic diversity among Papuan New Guinean peoples revealed

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Huge genetic diversity among Papuan New Guinean peoples revealed

Genetic diversity found to mirror linguistic and cultural diversity among Papuan New Guinean people

The first large-scale genetic study of people in Papua New Guinea has shown that different groups within the country are genetically highly different from each other. Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their colleagues reveal that the people there have remained genetically independent from Europe and Asia for most of the last 50,000 years, and that people from the country’s isolated highlands region have been completely independent even until the present day.

Immunotherapy treatment option for selected breast cancer patients, genetic study suggests

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Immunotherapy treatment option for selected breast cancer patients, genetic study suggests

Opens up the possibility of another therapy option for approximately 1,000 breast cancer patients in the UK

Immunotherapy drugs could help some breast cancer patients based on the genetic changes in their tumours, researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators find. Published today (13 September 2017) in Cancer Research, scientists identify particular genetic changes in a DNA repair mechanism in breast cancer.

Type 2 diabetes is being misdiagnosed in African Americans, genetic study suggests

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Type 2 diabetes is being misdiagnosed in African Americans, genetic study suggests

Around 650,000 African Americans in the US have a unique genetic variant that significantly reduces the accuracy of the HbA1c blood test, meaning they could have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes

One of the tests used to diagnose type 2 diabetes and monitor blood sugar control is influenced by 60 genetic variants, an international team of scientists, including those from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, has found. One genetic variant in particular, found only in African Americans, significantly reduces the accuracy of the HbA1c blood test used to diagnose and monitor the condition. This means around 650,000 African Americans in the US could have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes if tested with the HbA1c test alone.

The Brain Tumour Charity grants WINDOW Consortium £1.5 million for new research into combination therapies to treat brain cancer

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The Brain Tumour Charity grants WINDOW Consortium £1.5 million for new research into combination therapies to treat brain cancer

The Dutch/British consortium will study glioblastoma

This unique collaboration will establish an international scientific network to generate more effective combination therapies against this deadly cancer, which has so far proved intransigent to any treatment. WINDOW will test many drug combinations to target different cells within each individual patient's tumour.

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