Sanger researcher awarded the ISTT Prize

Allan Bradley has been awarded the ninth ISTT Prize for his contribution to transgenic technologies

Sanger researcher awarded the ISTT Prize

abradley.jpgGenome Research Limited
Allan Bradley has been awarded the 9th ISTT Prize for his contribution to transgenic technologies

The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) has announced that Professor Allan Bradley, Director Emeritus of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, and Chief Scientific Officer at Kymab, will be awarded the next ISTT Prize for his outstanding contributions to the field of transgenic technologies.

In awarding this prize to Allan, the ISTT Prize committee acknowledges his many fundamental contributions to the science and technology of manipulating the mouse genome, throughout his career. Allan's strong vision and leadership skills - from the Sanger Institute, in creating the EUCOMM/KOMP (IKMC) initiative, for systematic functional mouse genomics - have had a massive impact on the field of transgenic technologies.

Allan's contributions to the field of transgenic technologies began in the1980's with his pioneering work on embryonic stem cells, demonstrating germline transmission in 1984, revealing the potential for embryonic stem cells to generate mice carrying mutations in genes.

Allan's team at the Sanger Institute now works on large-scale disruption of genes in embryonic stem cells and tissues of mice to discover genes involved in basic cellular processes as well as diseases like cancer. He is also the founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Kymab, a biopharmaceutical company that uses mouse genomic technologies developed by his team.

"I was thrilled to learn I had been selected to receive the ninth ISTT Prize. It is truly a great honour and I appreciate the recognition conferred by ISTT and its members. As the potential of stem cell research grows, the clinical and biological possibilities for stem cells are astounding. I am extremely grateful to have been a part of this epic journey - to see the progression from the early days of mouse genomics to where we are now is incredible."

Allan Bradley, Director Emeritus of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, and Chief Scientific Officer at Kymab

Allan will present the keynote address at the meeting and will be given lifetime honorary membership in the ISTT and a sterling silver sculpture of a mouse embryonic cell created by the Hungarian artist Mr Bela Rozsnyay.

"Allan's work is enormously influential in the area of mouse genomics. I am truly delighted that his continuing research has received recognition from the ISTT."

Professor Mike Stratton, Director of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

The aim of the ISTT is to encourage knowledge generation, discussion, training and education, and the diffusion of the technologies and specific research used for the genetic modification of animals; in particular those aimed at generating or analysing transgenic animals in biology, biomedicine and biotechnology disciplines.

Allan will receive the award at the next Transgenic Technology meeting, which will be held in Guangzhou, China on February 25-27, 2013.

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