Sequencing programme to produce the "human sequence map" by the year 2002

The Governors of the Wellcome Trust have announced their decision to support the proposal from the Sanger Centre at the Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, to spearhead a new massive international sequencing programme to produce the "human sequence map" by the year 2002.

Sequencing programme to produce the "human sequence map" by the year 2002

The Governors of the Wellcome Trust have announced their decision to support the proposal from the Sanger Centre at the Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, to spearhead a new massive international sequencing programme to produce the "human sequence map" by the year 2002. The Trust has agreed to provide continued funding to the Sanger Centre to enable them to complete at least 500 million base-pairs of the human genome within this time-frame. This will make a very significant contribution to the worldwide effort, and it is anticipated that other international laboratories and funding agencies will participate to provide a complete picture of the human genome in the public domain.

The strategy proposed by the Sanger Centre, in partnership with the Genome Sequencing Center at Washington University, St. Louis, is to produce a "sequence map" consisting of a series of accurately sequenced regions, separated by small gaps which, for technical reasons, cannot be sequenced economically. The map will typically provide 95 per cent coverage at >99.9 per cent accuracy and will include all the genes in the human genome at an ultimate cost of less than 10p per base-pair.

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