News Archive

News Archive

British science targets nearly half of world's genetic diseases

British science targets nearly half of world's genetic diseases

British scientists are helping the world to understand four out of 10 of known genetic diseases, such as cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease.

Currently 39% of all the disease genes found have been discovered on "British" chromosomes. There are 24 chromosomes in the human body, and eight of these are being sequenced (that is, genetically read) by researchers at the Sanger Institute, at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus near Cambridge.

Human Genome Project shows the wonder and the mystery of humankind

Human Genome Project shows the wonder and the mystery of humankind

"It has not escaped our notice that the more we learn about the human genome, the more there is to explore."- Conclusion to the human genome sequencing paper

The publication today (11 February 2001) of the detailed sequencing and mapping papers of the Human Genome Project shows that the "book of humankind" is even more wonderful, and mysterious, than previously thought.

Dr John Sulston Knighted in the New Year Honours list

Dr John Sulston Knighted in the New Year Honours list

Dr John Sulston, former Director of the Sanger Centre, was awarded a knighthood for services to genome research in the New Year Honours list.

Dr Sulston was instrumental in establishing the Sanger Centre and, with the backing of the Wellcome Trust, built the Centre into one of the world's premier genomics centres. Today, the Sanger Centre is responsible for sequencing one-third of the human genome, the genomes of dozens of disease-causing organisms, as well as providing annotation - that is interpreting the DNA code.

Sanger Centre to sequence zebrafish genome in new Wellcome Trust Initiative

Sanger Centre to sequence zebrafish genome in new Wellcome Trust Initiative

Powerful model organism for genetics, development

With a genome only half the size of that of mouse or human, the zebrafish will play a key role in finding genes in the other genomes. The new project is predicted to take three years.

Public-Private Consortium to Accelerate Sequencing of Mouse Genome

Public-Private Consortium to Accelerate Sequencing of Mouse Genome

Results will expedite discovery of human genes

The National Institutes of Health, the Wellcome Trust and three private companies today announced they have formed a consortium to speed up the determination of the DNA sequence of the mouse genome. The Mouse Sequencing Consortium will provide $58 million over the next six months to decipher the mouse genetic code.

Wellcome Trust Announces Major Investment in Genome Bioinformatics

Wellcome Trust Announces Major Investment in Genome Bioinformatics

Five-year investment to support the Ensembl project, the database providing automatic annotation of the human genome

The increased resources in staff and computer power for the gene "software" will mean a much speedier collection and dissemination of information on the function of genes, greatly aiding the work of researchers around the world in finding new diagnostic methods and treatments for a huge variety of diseases.

Completion of draft human genome: press pack

Completion of draft human genome: press pack

Below are links to all the news releases and material created to announce the completion of the draft human genome

A wide range of supporting materials were created to supplement the main announcement of the draft human genome.

Human Genome Project Helps Child Birth Defects

Human Genome Project Helps Child Birth Defects

Pinpointing the 'bad' genes that lead to illness, deformity or a failure to develop normally, coupled with an understanding of how they work, has been facilitated by the Human Genome Project which is identifying the entire genetic code.

Scientists, like Professor Scambler, who are interested in medical conditions that children are born with are now able to 'database mine' the publicly available sequence data from the international Human Genome Project. In effect, the researchers look through the free-of-charge data as soon as it becomes available to try to identify the genes that may play a role in certain diseases.

Human Genome Project Helps Identify Skin Disease Genes

Human Genome Project Helps Identify Skin Disease Genes

Dr. Alain Hovnanian is head of the Molecular Dermatology Unit at the Wellcome Trust Center for Human Genetics, Oxford. His team have been using the freely available DNA sequences from the Human Genome Project to identify the genes involved in three severe inherited skin disorders...

Using data from the human genome project and information from other databases, Dr Hovnanian's team identified 10 new genes and 4 known genes that were candidates for the disease gene. They then determined whether these genes were expressed in the skin and looked for mutations in those that were. To their surprise, they found that affected family members had defects in a gene that was previously known to function mainly in the heart and skeletal muscles. It turned out the protein the gene produced allows epidermal cells to maintain calcium stores, which are important for the function of desmosomes.

The History of the UK Genome Project

The History of the UK Genome Project

1990 Drs Sulston and Coulson in collaboration with Dr Waterston (Washington University, USA) began a pilot study of the genomic sequence of the round worm C. elegans ...

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