News Archive

News Archive

Canadian, British and American scientists launch major new genome partnership to catalogue all common copy number variations

Canadian, British and American scientists launch major new genome partnership to catalogue all common copy number variations

International team focuses on copy number variants in the human genome

An international team will use state-of-the-art, high-density microarrays and new computer algorithms to improve the detection of variants in the human genome which are implicated in various diseases. The new systems are the foundation of Phase 2 of the Genome Structural Variation Consortium, which was set up in 2004 and seeks to identify structurally variable regions in the human genome.

Potent possibilities for parasite attack

Potent possibilities for parasite attack

New Leishmania genome sequences highlight gene targets for treatment development

A comparison of three parasite species that cause Leishmaniasis has identified a small number of genes, many new to biology, that will provide a framework to target the search for new treatments. Leishmaniasis is a devastating disease that affects about two million people each year and threatens one-fifth of the world's population and new treatments are desperately needed.

The Wider View from a Detailed Focus

The Wider View from a Detailed Focus

New Project challenges conventional view of genome biology

A major study of the organization and regulation of the human genome published today changes our concept of how our genome works. The integrated study is an exhaustive analysis of 1 per cent of the genome that, for the first time, gives an extensive view of genetic activity alongside the cellular machinery that allows DNA to be read and replicated.

Largest ever study of genetics of common diseases

Largest ever study of genetics of common diseases

Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium and genetics of seven common diseases

The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, the largest ever study of the genetics behind common diseases such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and coronary heart disease, today publishes its results in the journals Nature and Nature Genetics.

Botulism bug has few genome wrinkles

Botulism bug has few genome wrinkles

Genome of Clostridium botulinum reveals the background to world's deadliest toxin

The genome of the organism that produces the world's most lethal toxin is revealed today. This toxin is the one real weapon in the genome of Clostridium botulinum and less than 2 kg - the weight of two bags of sugar - is enough to kill every person on the planet. Very small amounts of the same toxin are used in medical treatments, one of which is known as Botox®.

Minuscule molecules pack a powerful punch

Minuscule molecules pack a powerful punch

Mouse microRNA knockout uncovers critical roles in immune system

A role for a microRNA in the immune system has been shown by study of one of the world's first microRNA knockout mouse, reported Friday 27 April in Science. The microRNA acts as a lynchpin to balance the response of immune defences and the researchers suggest the corresponding human gene will have a similar vital role.

Molecular mechanism of learning

Molecular mechanism of learning

Genetic basis for higher mental functions that provides new insights into autism and learning disability discovered

The study, published online today in the Journal of Neuroscience and carried out by the Genes to Cognition Consortium, is the first to look at mice that lack the SAP102 gene. Male humans lacking the SAP102 gene have mental retardation or learning disabilities, including poor reading.

Drivers and Passengers on the Road to Cancer

Drivers and Passengers on the Road to Cancer

Largest genome study of cancer types finds many mutations

The survey, published in Nature today, shows that the number of mutated genes that drive development of cancer is greater than previously thought. Significantly, as well as driver mutations for cancer, each cell type carries many more passenger mutations that have hitchhiked along for the ride. The study shows that a challenge for cancer biologists will be to distinguish the drivers from the larger number of passengers.

Which Genome Variants Matter?

Which Genome Variants Matter?

Global Survey of the Consequences of small and large DNA variants in our Genome

Findings published today in Science will accelerate the search for genes involved in human disease. The report provides a first genome-wide view of how the unique composition of genetic variation within each of us leads to unique patterns of gene activity.

Stealth technology maintains fitness after sex

Stealth technology maintains fitness after sex

How 'DNA parasites' can increase spread of antibiotic resistance

Pathogens can become superbugs without their even knowing it, research published today in Science shows. 'Stealth' plasmids - circular DNA 'parasites' of bacteria that can carry antibiotic-resistance genes - produce a protein that increases the chances of survival and spread of the antibiotic-resistant strain.

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