News Archive

News Archive

Black Death unveiled

Black Death unveiled

The bacterium which causes plague, which once killed millions throughout Europe, has been sequenced by a team of scientists backed by funding from the Wellcome Trust biomedical research charity.

Completion of the Yersinia pestis sequencing will hopefully allow researchers to develop more drugs to combat the disease, which is still prevalent in some parts of the world. One vaccine produced at the Ministry of Defence's Porton Down establishment is already undergoing trials.

Top international award for British genome champion

Top international award for British genome champion

Sir John Sulston, former Director of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Centre which carried out the United Kingdom contribution to the international Human Genome Project, will receive the Prince Asturia's Award for Scientific and Technical Research.

The award means that Sir John will receive five million pesetas (£18,000), a special Joan Miró sculpture, a diploma and insignia. The awards will be presented on 26 October in Oviedo in Spain at a ceremony presided over by HRH the Prince of Asturias.

Of mice and men - First phase of mouse genome sequencing project completed

Of mice and men - First phase of mouse genome sequencing project completed

Publicly Available Data Expected to Speed Medical Discovery

The Mouse Sequencing Consortium (MSC), announced today (Tuesday 8th May 2001) that it has completed the first phase of reading the mouse 'book of life', reaching its goal on time and within budget.

Wellcome Trust promotes open door policy of human genome treasure chest

Wellcome Trust promotes open door policy of human genome treasure chest

"World's biggest free gift is still a secret"

Biomedical research charity the Wellcome Trust today (Thursday 26th April 2001) launches an advertising campaign to promote the public human genome databases, including the UK-based Ensembl service, which receives the majority of its funding from the Trust. Widespread access to the public human genome databases is essential if the Human Genome Project sequence is to be translated into healthcare benefits, says the Trust

Leprosy genome shows massive gene decay

Leprosy genome shows massive gene decay

Leprosy - the enigmatic scourge

There are nearly 700,000 new cases of leprosy each year. However, doctors don't fully understand how leprosy spreads and cannot grow it in the laboratory. New research published today in Nature magazine reveals that the organism that causes leprosy may have manoeuvred itself into an evolutionary cul-de-sac.

Comparison of draft human sequence versions from the public and private domain

Comparison of draft human sequence versions from the public and private domain

Now that the papers from the two teams can be inspected, we can for the first time judge the relative quality of the two versions and the strengths of the methods employed the different initiatives: mapping and finishing process (public) and pure whole genome shotgun (private).

The greater part of the data for Celera's assemblies comes from the public Human Genome Project (HGP). Despite this benefit, Celera's assembly is only comparable with that of the public HGP and is dependent upon it. This suggests that pure whole genome shotgun has failed as far as generating the sequence of the human genome is concerned.

British science targets nearly half of world's genetic diseases

British science targets nearly half of world's genetic diseases

British scientists are helping the world to understand four out of 10 of known genetic diseases, such as cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease.

Currently 39% of all the disease genes found have been discovered on "British" chromosomes. There are 24 chromosomes in the human body, and eight of these are being sequenced (that is, genetically read) by researchers at the Sanger Institute, at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus near Cambridge.

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