News Archive

News Archive

Identity Swap

Identity Swap

Finding the variants that human history has favoured

Sequence differences in less than 0.2 per cent of the three-billion-base human genome play a vital role in a bewildering variety of human disease. Today, researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the Cambridge University's Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, together with international colleagues report in PLoS Genetics their detailed maps of differences implicated in disease as well as genes that are unchanged in recent human history.

UnMASCing Machines in the Brain

UnMASCing Machines in the Brain

Uncovering the molecular networks at the basis of cognition

In a report published online on Wednesday 18 January in Molecular Systems Biology, researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the University of Edinburgh show that the proteins that comprise the synapse form a complex and densely connected molecular network. This novel model of a molecular network presents a new way to understand how information is processed in the brain and how mental illnesses arise.

Around the World in 800 Billion Bases

Around the World in 800 Billion Bases

Sanger Institute Genetic Records are World's Biggest

On Tuesday 17 January 2006 the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's World Trace Archive database of DNA sequences hit one billion entries. The Trace Archive is a store of all the sequence data produced and published by the world scientific community, including the Sanger Institute's own prodigious output as a world-leading genomics institution.

International Partnership to Sequence the Pig Genome

International Partnership to Sequence the Pig Genome

Two-year $10 million project

The two-year project will lead to the development of new DNA-based tools to identify and select breeds of pig that resist infectious diseases and produce leaner cuts of meat for consumers. There is an increasing need to improve overall pig husbandry in terms of health, welfare and sustainability, as well as traceability, food quality and safety.

Sifting through the Genome Baggage

Sifting through the Genome Baggage

A New Method to Find Important Genome Regions

Evolutionary forces tend to retain important DNA sequences, whilst allowing unimportant sequences to change. Consequently, protein-coding regions - only about 1.5 per cent of the human genome - are similar in all mammalian species.

Ubiquitous, Essential ... but Deadly

Ubiquitous, Essential ... but Deadly

Genome sequence of fungus reveals its weapons

The genome sequence of the most common mould that causes disease worldwide is published in Nature on Thursday 22 December 2005. The code of Aspergillus fumigatus, an air-borne, soil-dwelling fungus, was cracked by an international team led by researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, The Institute for Genomic Research and the University of Manchester.

Tackling the Basis (and Bases) of Disease

Tackling the Basis (and Bases) of Disease

Funding Boost for Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Research

Major new funding for the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, announced today, will help in the battle against human disease, including three of the world's biggest killers - cancer, malaria and diabetes.

Using Maps to Find Managers

Using Maps to Find Managers

Revolutionary new methods to find mutations in disease

Through the Human Genome Project, the HapMap Project and other efforts, we are beginning to identify genes that are modified in some diseases. What are more difficult to measure and identify are the regulatory regions in DNA - the 'managers' of genes - that control gene activity and might be important in causing disease.

International Consortium Completes Map Of Human Genetic Variation

International Consortium Completes Map Of Human Genetic Variation

Major Role for Wellcome Trust Researchers in the Quest to Identify Genes Involved in Common Diseases

The International HapMap Consortium today published a comprehensive catalogue of human genetic variation, a landmark achievement that is already accelerating the search for genes involved in common diseases, such as asthma, diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has major role in EU initiative to understand the genetic make-up of human diseases

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has major role in EU initiative to understand the genetic make-up of human diseases

EU commits €13M to study genetic make-up of complex diseases

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a world leader in DNA sequencing and is applying the same determination and skills to gene analysis. That effort is recognized today in the announcement that the Institute is a major partner in a new European Commission consortium - EUCOMM.

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