News Archive - 2018

News Archive - 2018

Multidrug resistant malaria spread under the radar for years in Cambodia

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Multidrug resistant malaria spread under the radar for years in Cambodia

Study suggests that ongoing genomic surveillance is vital to inform malaria control strategies

The most comprehensive genetic study of malaria parasites in Southeast Asia has shown that resistance to antimalarial drugs was under-reported for years in Cambodia. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators have shown that the parasites developed multidrug resistance to first-line treatments extremely rapidly.

Sarah Teichmann awarded the Genetics Society’s 2018 Mary Lyon Medal

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Sarah Teichmann awarded the Genetics Society’s 2018 Mary Lyon Medal

Award recognises Dr Teichmann’s “outstanding research” in understanding how the immune system works by using genomics and bioinformatics approaches

Wellcome Sanger Institute Group Leader Dr Sarah Teichmann has received the prestigious Mary Lyon Medal 2018. This annual recognition, named after the distinguished geneticist Mary Lyon FRS, rewards outstanding research in genetics by scientists who are in the middle of their research career. As part of the award, Sarah has been invited to present a lecture at one of the Genetics Society’s scientific meetings.

Hidden genetic effects behind immune diseases may be missed, study suggests

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Hidden genetic effects behind immune diseases may be missed, study suggests

For the first time immune cells created from human induced pluripotent stem cells (HiPSCs) have been used to model immune response variation between people

The role of genetics in the risk of having an immune disease could be missed in research, scientists suggest. Using a combination of stem cells and novel analytical tools, scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators discovered that clues to the contribution of genetic variation to disease risk lie not only in the genes, but also in the molecular switches that control those genes.

BioBright, Sanger Institute aim to cut drug-development time

Gosia Trynka (left) and Charles Fracchia, BioBright CEO, are employing BioBright tools in Trynka’s lab at the Wellcome Sanger Institute

BioBright, Sanger Institute aim to cut drug-development time

Collaboration promises better, more reproducible biomedical data

BioBright, a firm dedicated to creating the smart laboratory of the future, has announced a collaboration with the Wellcome Sanger Institute that could lead to the faster development of drugs for diseases of the immune system like rheumatoid arthritis.

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