News Archive - 2015

News Archive - 2015

Antibiotic resistant typhoid detected in countries around the world

Antibiotic resistant typhoid detected in countries around the world

Unappreciated global spread of multiple antimicrobial resistant typhoid mapped by international consortium

A landmark genomic study, with contributors from over two-dozen countries, shows the current problem of antibiotic resistant typhoid is driven by a single clade, family of bacteria, called H58 that has now spread globally.

Patient cancer cells help to test treatments

Patient cancer cells help to test treatments

Organoids made of human tissue can predict patient response to drugs

A study, published in Cell, demonstrates the power of organoids to capture, in three dimensions, the multiple mutations that occur in tumours. Organoids, small clusters of cells that accurately mimic the behaviour of human tissue, can be used to test cancer drugs and, eventually, to identify effective personalised treatments for patients.

Most people eager to know the secrets of their genetics

Most people eager to know the secrets of their genetics

Largest survey of public attitudes shows perceived value of genomic data

A survey of nearly 7000 people has revealed that 98 per cent want to be informed if researchers using their genetic data stumble upon indicators of a serious preventable or treatable disease. The study, which comes after the Government's announcement that Genomics England will sequence 100,000 genomes by 2017, begins an important and on-going conversation about how our genomic data is used.

Action against antibiotic resistance begins with the community

Action against antibiotic resistance begins with the community

Community-based study unravels global transmission and resistance patterns in emerging Shigella strain

To combat antibiotic resistance, scientists need to understand the evolution of bacteria and examine this alongside the characteristics of the populations they infect, according to research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Single cells seen in unprecedented detail

Single cells seen in unprecedented detail

Parallel sequencing of DNA and RNA provides insight into secret world of cells

Researchers have developed a large-scale sequencing technique called Genome and Transcriptome Sequencing (G&T-seq) that reveals, simultaneously, the unique genome sequence of a single cell and the activity of genes within that single cell.

Mountain gorillas enter the genomic age

Mountain gorillas enter the genomic age

First in-depth analysis reveals genetic impact of long-term population decline

The first project to sequence whole genomes from mountain gorillas has given scientists and conservationists new insight into the impact of population decline on these critically endangered apes. While mountain gorillas are extensively inbred and at risk of extinction, research published today in Science finds more to be optimistic about in their genomes than expected.

Prostate cancer study overturns thinking on cancer's spread

Prostate cancer study overturns thinking on cancer's spread

Multiple cells can travel from prostate to create a tumour in a new tissue

In a study that overturns previous thinking about how human cancers spread, researchers have discovered that multiple cancerous cells can spread from a primary tumour in the prostate to the same new location in the body. The study recorded patterns of spread from primary prostate tumours to secondary tumours through a process called metastasis, which causes 90 per cent of cancer-related deaths.

Parliamentary Group seeks bioscience health benefits

Parliamentary Group seeks bioscience health benefits

All-Party Group to help politicians realise benefits of science and technology for the NHS

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a partner organisation in a prospective Parliamentary All-party Group (APG) aimed at helping politicians to understand and realise the health benefits of UK investment and excellence in science and technology. The group plans to begin work after the General Election in May to ensure that NHS patients benefit fully from scientific advances.

Sanger Institute PhD student wins prestigious prize

Sanger Institute PhD student wins prestigious prize

Ludmil Alexandrov receives Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award

The Basic Sciences Division of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre in Seattle, US, awards the prize each year to celebrate outstanding achievement during graduate studies in the biological sciences. Dr Alexandrov, the only European recipient on this year's list, will present his influential paper 'Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer', published in Nature, at the centre's annual scientific symposium on 1 May 2015.

Supporting Women in Science

Supporting Women in Science

The Wellcome Genome Campus announces first Best Practice Awards

The Wellcome Genome Campus is marking International Women's Day 2015 by giving its first award for Best Practice in Supporting Women in Science. The recipients are Dr John Overington of EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) and Ms Laura Huckins of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.

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