News Archive - 2015

News Archive - 2015

New antimalarial compound discovered

New antimalarial compound discovered

Promising lead kills parasites in both humans and mosquitoes

A study published in Nature develops a chemical that is effective against the deadly Plasmodium falciparum parasite at several stages of its life cycle. The chemical, DDD107498, was found during a screen of University of Dundee's library of compounds for drug discovery. Genetic approaches identified the target of the compound, which is a part of the parasite's biology that has not been attacked by previous drugs. Researchers therefore believe it has great potential to work against current drug-resistant parasites.

Fellowship renamed in honour of Janet Thornton

Fellowship renamed in honour of Janet Thornton

Initiative named for former EBI director supports scientists returning to research

The Janet Thornton Fellowship is a postdoctoral fellowship aimed at getting scientists back into scientific research if they have had a career break of a minimum of 12 months. The fellowship was launched in 2014, as part of the Sanger Institute's commitment to retaining and developing talent.

Genome of emerging antibiotic resistant bacteria decoded

Genome of emerging antibiotic resistant bacteria decoded

Largest collection of Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria genetically sequenced

An analysis of the largest genetically decoded collection of the bacterial pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae, which causes a spectrum of diseases in humans and animals, reveals the impact of antibiotic treatment on its population structure and provides the tools needed to track this important pathogen.

Sarah Teichmann receives EMBO Gold Award

Sarah Teichmann receives EMBO Gold Award

Wellcome Genome Campus Research group leader recognised for excellence in science

The European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO) Gold Award 2015 has been awarded to Sarah Teichmann, Senior Group Leader at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Research Group Leader at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), in recognition of her contribution to science. The award underscores the increasing importance of informatics and interdisciplinary research in biology.

Ebola sequencing data released to global research community

Ebola sequencing data released to global research community

Sanger scientists aid collaborative efforts to curb further spread of deadly disease

A team of scientists that is part of an international, multi-organisational effort to curb further spread of deadly Ebola in Sierra Leone has released their first dataset of the virus' genetic structure online. Professor Paul Kellam, Group Leader of Virus Genomics at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, leads the team focused on mapping the genomic data.

Out of Africa via Egypt

Out of Africa via Egypt

Humans migrated north, rather than south, in the main successful migration from Cradle of Humankind

New research suggests that European and Asian (Eurasian) peoples originated when early Africans moved north - through the region that is now Egypt - to expand into the rest of the world. The findings, published in the American Journal of Human Genetics, answer a long-standing question as to whether early humans emerged from Africa by a route via Egypt, or via Ethiopia.

CRISPR genome editing far safer than previously thought

CRISPR genome editing far safer than previously thought

No off-target mutations found when technique is tested in live models

CRISPR gene-editing technology is much safer than previously thought, according to new research published in Nature Methods. Concerns about the technique leading to unanticipated changes in the genome are addressed in the paper, which demonstrates that such off-target mutations are actually extremely rare.

Using healthy skin to identify cancer's origins

Using healthy skin to identify cancer's origins

Cancer-associated DNA changes exist in 25 per cent of normal skin cells

Normal skin contains an unexpectedly high number of cancer-associated mutations, according to a study published in Science. The findings illuminate the first steps cells take towards becoming a cancer and demonstrate the value of analysing normal tissue to learn more about the origins of the disease.

Drug target for asthma discovered

Drug target for asthma discovered

Identification of gene's role in asthma could lead to therapy

The over-active immune cells responsible for asthma depend on the gene BCL11B to develop into mature cells, according to a study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. The identification of this gene's role could help in the search for asthma therapies.

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