News Archive - 2014

News Archive - 2014

Celebrating inspirational female scientists

Celebrating inspirational female scientists

Genome Campus scientists talk about the women who have inspired them in their career

International Women's Day celebrates the steps taken towards gender equality and highlights the ground left to cover. In line with this year's theme 'Inspiring Change', the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has asked scientists on the Genome Campus to reflect on the female scientists who have inspired them in their career.

The Global Alliance of Genomics and Health holds first partnership meeting

The Global Alliance of Genomics and Health holds first partnership meeting

Global Alliance for Genomics and Health grows to over 150 partners, moves forward on approaches to meet the challenge of genomic and clinical data sharing and advance human health

The Global Alliance aims to accelerate the world-wide effort to responsibly aggregate and analyse large amounts of genomic and clinical information - seeking best practices where they exist, and developing new approaches where needed - in order to advance the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment for cancer, inherited diseases, infectious diseases, and drug responses.

A crisper CRISPR: safer genome modification

A crisper CRISPR: safer genome modification

Single-strand cutting enzyme safer replacement for genome modification

Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the Model Animal Research Center of Nanjing University, China, have developed a safer way of genome editing. This method can be used on any organism and dramatically minimises the problem caused by unplanned damage to other regions of the genome.

Protein essential to the spread of malaria uncovered

Protein essential to the spread of malaria uncovered

Master switch discovered that triggers the development of sexual forms of the malaria parasite

For the first time, researchers have identified a single protein that acts as the master switch to trigger the development of sexual forms of the malaria parasite, a stage essential for the spread of the disease.

Out of Africa the evolution of Plasmodium vivax

Out of Africa the evolution of Plasmodium vivax

Research disputes theory of the origin of the deadly human malaria parasite, Plasmodium vivax

Researchers have shown that Plasmodium vivax, which causes the majority of human malaria infections in Asia and Latin America, actually originated in Africa. The team found that wild-living apes in Central Africa are commonly infected with parasites that, genetically, are nearly identical to human P. vivax.

Harmless bacterium could be source of antibiotic resistance

Harmless bacterium could be source of antibiotic resistance

Exchange of genetic material between harmless bacteria could be reservoir of antibiotic resistance

Researchers have found that a harmless bacterium could be a source for antibiotic resistance in treatments against such diseases as pneumonia, bacteraemia and meningitis. Their results could help in the design of better strategies to deal with the emergence of antibiotic resistance.

Finding what's important in our genome

Finding what's important in our genome

New integrated tool to predict the function of non-coding variants

Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute have developed software that predicts the likelihood of variants in non-coding regions - relatively unknown regions of DNA that make up 98 per cent of genome - having a functional role.

11,000-year-old living dog cancer reveals its secrets

11,000-year-old living dog cancer reveals its secrets

Genome of longest-living cancer reveals its origin and evolution

Scientists have sequenced the genome of the world's oldest continuously surviving cancer, a transmissible genital cancer that affects dogs. This cancer, which causes grotesque genital tumours in dogs around the world, first arose in a single dog that lived about 11,000 years ago. The cancer survived after the death of this dog by the transfer of its cancer cells to other dogs during mating.

Immune system development linked to leukaemia

Immune system development linked to leukaemia

Our defences against infection can be weaknesses in causing cancer

Scientists have discovered a genetic signature that implicates a key mechanism in the immune system as a driving force for a type of childhood leukaemia.

Why is type 2 diabetes an increasing problem?

Why is type 2 diabetes an increasing problem?

Popular theory to explain increasing frequency of type 2 diabetes refuted by evidence

Contrary to a common belief, researchers have shown that genetic regions associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes were unlikely to have been beneficial to people at stages through human evolution.

Pages