News Archive - 2013

News Archive - 2013

Rise in CF patient infections explained

Rise in CF patient infections explained

DNA sequencing reveals evidence for Mycobacterium abscessus transmission between Cystic Fibrosis patients

Researchers at Papworth Hospital, the University of Cambridge and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have discovered why a new type of dangerous bacterial infection has become more common among people with Cystic Fibrosis around the world. Through their ground-breaking research, the team has developed new measures to protect Cystic Fibrosis patients.

Tapeworm DNA contains drug weak spots

Tapeworm DNA contains drug weak spots

Existing drugs could be effective in treating this damaging parasite, the first full tapeworm genomes reveal

For the first time, researchers have mapped the genomes of tapeworms to reveal potential drug targets on which existing drugs could act. The genomes provide a new resource that offers faster ways to develop urgently needed and effective treatments for these debilitating diseases.

Dental decay: the evolution of oral diversity

Dental decay: the evolution of oral diversity

Ancient plaque DNA exposes the changes in oral microbiota driven by dietary shifts

Researchers have traced the evolutionary changes in the human diet by comparing bacteria preserved in the tooth plaque of early European settlers. This is the first detailed genetic record of the evolution of human microbiota.Ancient plaque DNA exposes the changes in oral microbiota driven by dietary shifts

Fighting against the flu

Fighting against the flu

Genetic variant is associated with severe flu in the Chinese population

Researchers have found that two out of three patients in China with a severe influenza infection have a genetic variant of the IFITIM3 gene, previously shown to affect the severity of influenza infection in patients in the UK. By contrast, only one in four people in China with mild influenza have this genetic variant.

Director awarded prestigious prize

Director awarded prestigious prize

Professor Mike Stratton awarded the Louis-Jeantet Prize for medicine

The Louis-Jeantet Prize for medicine is awarded each year to experienced researchers who have distinguished themselves in the field of biomedical research in Europe.

Chronic disease research awarded funding

Chronic disease research awarded funding

The MRC awards the African Partnership for Chronic Disease research five years' funding

This MRC funding will allow researchers from the partnership to develop a sustainable platform to share resources and skills which will help develop long-term strategies for disease control and management in sub-Saharan Africa.

Finding cancer culprits' fingerprints

Finding cancer culprits' fingerprints

Computer model helps researchers hunt out cancer-causing mutational signatures in the genome

Computer model helps researchers hunt out cancer-causing mutational signatures in the genome

Even great mutations need a little help from their friends

Even great mutations need a little help from their friends

Researchers have discovered that, in the influenza virus, being the most beneficial mutation is no guarantee of long-term genetic success.

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute scientists have used computer modelling to understand why some mutations in a virus gene rise to dominance and become 'fixed' in the genome of the virus, while others die out. Their findings were based upon real-world observations of the evolution of a human flu virus, using genome sequences collected over many years by researchers worldwide.

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