News Archive - 2013

News Archive - 2013

Parasitic worm genome uncovers potential drug targets

Parasitic worm genome uncovers potential drug targets

Barber Pole worm genome provides an essential platform to understand drug resistance in worms

Researchers have identified five enzymes that are essential to the survival of a parasitic worm that infects livestock worldwide and is a great threat to global food security. Two of these proteins are already being studied as potential drug targets against other pathogens.

Cancer's origins revealed

Cancer's origins revealed

Researchers discover the genetic imprints and signatures left by DNA-damaging processes that lead to cancer

Researchers have provided the first comprehensive compendium of mutational processes that drive tumour development. Together, these mutational processes explain most mutations found in 30 of the most common cancer types. This new understanding of cancer development could help to treat and prevent a wide-range of cancers.

Protein that accelerates age, brakes cancer

Protein that accelerates age, brakes cancer

Prelamin A protein causes accelerated ageing disorders and also prevents the spread of cancer cells

Researchers have found that a protein responsible for accelerated aging disorders can dramatically slow down the spread of cancers.

Distinct brain disorders biologically linked

Distinct brain disorders biologically linked

Disruption to the gene TOP3B increases susceptibility to schizophrenia and a learning disorder

A team of researchers have shown that schizophrenia and a disorder associated with autism and learning difficulties share a common biological pathway. This is one of the first times that researchers have uncovered genetic evidence for the underlying causes of schizophrenia.

Institute scientist to give prestigious Royal Society lecture

Institute scientist to give prestigious Royal Society lecture

Royal Society Francis Crick lecture in 2014 will be given by Duncan T Odom

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Associate Faculty member, Dr Duncan Odom, has been invited by the Royal Society to deliver the prestigious Francis Crick Lecture. Today's announcement (Monday 22 July) recognises Duncan's pioneering research in the field of comparative functional genomics. His studies have changed the scientific community's understanding of how gene activity and its control mechanisms have influenced evolution.

How mice teach us about disease

How mice teach us about disease

Open-access resource reveals new genes and pathways linked to human disease

Researchers have created a large new resource of more than 900 genes switched off one-at-a-time in mice to discover which genes are important for a wide range of biological functions such as fertility or hearing.

Unique route to stem cells

Unique route to stem cells

Designer proteins developed to deliver stem cells

Researchers have developed a new method to produce stem cells using designed proteins. The new system is more precise and more natural than current techniques and the team believe it could be a more efficient and safer route to producing stem cells.

New opportunities to treat bowel cancer

New opportunities to treat bowel cancer

Research in mice identifies new treatment options for one of the most common cancers

Researchers have discovered the genetic processes that cause specific types of bowel cancer. Using this knowledge, they identified cancer drugs that target these genes. Their findings offer the opportunity to develop personalised treatment based on a person's genetic profile.

Talking DNA and disease at the Royal Society

Talking DNA and disease at the Royal Society

Sanger Institute researchers are sparking discussion on genomes and healthcare

The Sanger Institute is sending 50 of its researchers to this year's Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition to take visitors on a journey through genetic discoveries and find out what they think should be done with their DNA data.

Relentless killer captured by art

Relentless killer captured by art

Artist Deborah Robinson explores how the Sanger Institute research is fighting malaria in a new digital artwork

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute artist in residence, Deborah Robinson is displaying her malaria-inspired digital artwork at the Anglia Ruskin Gallery. Her exhibition, which runs from 26 June-18 July, explores the cutting-edge research the Institute's Malaria Programme is carrying out to understand and combat the global killer.

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