News Archive - 2013

News Archive - 2013

Novel mutations define two types of bone tumour

Novel mutations define two types of bone tumour

Two related genes underlie the development of two rare bone tumours in nearly 100 per cent of patients

Scientists have made a rare discovery that allows them to attribute two types of tumour almost entirely to specific mutations that lie in two related genes.

Genetic variants decrease rate of metabolism

Genetic variants decrease rate of metabolism

Defects to gene reveal potential new therapeutic targets against obesity and type 2 diabetes

Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge have found a novel genetic cause of severe obesity. Although relatively rare, this is the first time that scientists have seen genetic variants that reduce the body's ability to burn calories.

Cutting-edge new build for Genome Campus

Cutting-edge new build for Genome Campus

Wellcome Trust Genome Campus gets permission for British Museum-inspired build

This new building work will see the current cloisters and grassed areas opened up and enclosed under a spectacular glass roof to create a multi-use space for both day and evening activities. The roof, which is the central feature of the build, is designed to create a light and elegant space through the transparent and translucent areas of glass panelling above.

Sex in Science launches web presence on Ada Lovelace Day

Sex in Science launches web presence on Ada Lovelace Day

Website promoting women in science unveiled as nation remembers inspirational 19th Century mathematician

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and European Bioinformatics Institute's (EBI) Sex in Science programme launched its website today to coincide with Ada Lovelace day, an annual celebration of the inspirational 19th Century female mathematician who was one of the world's earliest computer scientists.

When does a cell decide which direction to take?

When does a cell decide which direction to take?

Biology behind stem cells could improve systems to deliver treatments or cells for tissue repair

New cells used in growth or for repair of a damaged tissue derive from a group of specialised dividing cells - stem cells. Stem cells can divide to maintain the source of new cells or can commit irrevocably to becoming a specialised cell, such as a liver or pancreas cell.

Big data getting to the heart of disease

Big data getting to the heart of disease

Insights into the causes of heart disease, diabetes and obesity

In the largest study of its kind, researchers have linked the level of harmful blood lipids, such as cholesterol, with 62 newly associated genetic regions. This brings the total number genetic regions linked to blood lipids to 152.

New technique identifies novel class of cancer's drivers

New technique identifies novel class of cancer's drivers

Sieving through 'junk' DNA reveals disease-causing genetic mutations

Researchers can now identify DNA regions within non-coding DNA, the major part of the genome that is not translated into a protein, where mutations can cause diseases such as cancer.

MERS Co-V genomes reveal complex transmission patterns

MERS Co-V genomes reveal complex transmission patterns

Genome sequencing identifies multiple chains of MERS Co-V infection in humans

Genome sequencing has identified several infection transmission chains of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in humans. The study published in The Lancet, which produced the largest number of MERS-CoV genomes described to date, provides evidence that MERS-CoV transmission patterns are more complicated than previously considered

£25m to kick start industrial revolution in regenerative medicine

£25m to kick start industrial revolution in regenerative medicine

The Sanger Institute contributes sequencing capabilities to new pluripotent stem cell Hub

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is participating in a £25m programme to develop regenerative medicine therapies for a range of applications, including Parkinson's disease, cardiovascular disease, wound and musculoskeletal repair, eye disorders and deafness.

The contribution of local animal populations to human drug resistant Salmonella infections may previously have been overstated

The contribution of local animal populations to human drug resistant Salmonella infections may previously have been overstated

Genomic study shows that Salmonella populations in humans and animals living side by side are more different than expected

A new study has shown that, contrary to popular belief, local domestic animals are unlikely to be the major source of antibiotic-resistant Salmonella in humans. The result comes from a detailed study of DNA from more than 370 Salmonella samples collected over a 22-year period.

Pages