News Archive - 2012

News Archive - 2012

Tracing the UK's No1 sexually transmitted infection

Tracing the UK's No1 sexually transmitted infection

Whole-genome analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis highlights risks with current method of tracking

In a study released today (11 March 2013) in Nature Genetics, researchers have found that Chlamydia has evolved more actively than was previously thought. Using whole-genome sequencing the researchers show that the exchange of DNA between different strains of Chlamydia to form new strains is much more common than expected.

Sanger's shining stars

Sanger's shining stars

Two Sanger Institute researchers awarded science heirlooms from the Medical Research Council

Two of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's leading scientists, Dr Elizabeth Murchison and Dr Nicole Soranzo, will be awarded a science heirloom for their contribution to Molecular Biology on International Women's Day.

What have we got in common with a Gorilla?

What have we got in common with a Gorilla?

An insight into human evolution from the gorilla genome sequence

Researchers announce today (7 March) that they have completed the genome sequence for the gorilla - the last genus of the living great apes to have its genome decoded. While confirming that our closest relative is the chimpanzee, the team show that much of the human genome more closely resembles the gorilla than it does the chimpanzee genome.

Improvements for animal research

Improvements for animal research

Institute recognised for its work to reduce the number of animals used for research

The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) has awarded Dr Stephen Pettitt, of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, a highly coveted prize for his contribution in reducing the number of animals used for research. Dr Pettitt received the recognition for developing better methods to make and track inheritance of mutations in mice, published in Nature Methods.

Elusive platelet count and limb development gene discovered

Elusive platelet count and limb development gene discovered

New study will enable better antenatal diagnosis for sufferers of rare blood and skeletal disorder

Researchers have identified an elusive gene responsible for Thrombocytopenia with Absent Radii (TAR), a rare inherited blood and skeletal disorder. As a result, this research is now being transformed into a medical test that allows prenatal diagnosis and genetic counselling in affected families.

Director discusses cancer evolution at prestigious conference

Director discusses cancer evolution at prestigious conference

Professor Mike Stratton will speak at the 2012 AAAS annual meeting about the evolution of the cancer genome

Professor Mike Stratton, Director of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, will speak about 'the evolution of the cancer genome' at the prestigious 2012 American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting. The AAAS annual meeting is one of the world's most widely recognised science events.

Preventing the devil's downfall

Preventing the devil's downfall

Genome of the Tasmanian devil contagious cancer sheds light on disease origin and spread

Researchers have sequenced the genome of a contagious cancer that is threatening the Tasmanian devil, the world's largest carnivorous marsupial, with extinction. Cataloguing the mutations present in the cancer has led to clues about where the cancer came from and how it became contagious.

When is a gene not a gene?

When is a gene not a gene?

Researchers develop a new catalogue to help identify gene variations associated with disease

A high-quality reference catalogue of the genetic changes that result in the deactivation of human genes has been developed by a team of researchers. In addition, the researchers report that each of us is carrying around 20 genes that have been completely inactivated.

Sanger researcher awarded the ISTT Prize

Sanger researcher awarded the ISTT Prize

Allan Bradley has been awarded the ninth ISTT Prize for his contribution to transgenic technologies

In awarding this prize to Allan, the ISTT Prize committee acknowledges his many fundamental contributions to the science and technology of manipulating the mouse genome, throughout his career. Allan's strong vision and leadership skills - from the Sanger Institute, in creating the EUCOMM/KOMP (IKMC) initiative, for systematic functional mouse genomics - have had a massive impact on the field of transgenic technologies.

Paths to Cardiovascular Diseases and Type 2 Diabetes

Paths to Cardiovascular Diseases and Type 2 Diabetes

Study finds multiple genomic regions that influence markers of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes

Researchers have found 31 regions on the genome that associate with biological indicators of common diseases such as cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes. These results may provide valuable insights into the biological processes of common and often fatal diseases.

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