News Archive - 2012

News Archive - 2012

Understanding breast cancer

Understanding breast cancer

Landscape of cancer genes and mutational processes in breast cancer

In a study published today (16 May 2012) in Nature, researchers describe nine new genes that drive the development of breast cancer. This takes the tally of all genes associated with breast cancer development to 40.

Institute researcher is sequence-squeezing champ

Institute researcher is sequence-squeezing champ

James Bonfield wins worldwide competition to speed up access to genetic data

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute researcher, James Bonfield, has won the $15000 Pistoia Alliance Sequence Squeeze prize for creating the best ways to efficiently compress genetic data. His work will help to speed the sharing of genetic information around the world, and he couldn't have done it without the help of his competitors.

Gene against pancreatic cancer discovered

Gene against pancreatic cancer discovered

Study points to potential new treatment for deadly pancreatic cancer

In a study published in Nature today (Sunday 29 April) shows that when a gene involved in protein degradation is switched-off through chemical tags on the DNA's surface, pancreatic cancer cells are protected from the bodies' natural cell death processes, become more aggressive, and can rapidly spread.

Rare muscular dystrophy gene mutations discovered

Rare muscular dystrophy gene mutations discovered

Study shows mutations in ISPD gene cause rare congenital muscular dystrophy in babies

Research co-led by Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has revealed gene mutations that account for 15 per cent of all babies born with Walker-Warburg syndrome, a rare congenital muscular dystrophy. The syndrome, which is associated with muscle wasting, brain and eye abnormalities, is fatal and most babies do not live beyond two years.

Sanger Institute scientist elected Fellow of the Royal Society

Sanger Institute scientist elected Fellow of the Royal Society

Professor Gordon Dougan joins the Fellowship of the Royal Society

Today's announcement (Friday 20 April) recognises Professor Dougan's significant contribution to the genetics of infectious disease.

Key genes that switch off with ageing identified

Key genes that switch off with ageing identified

Researchers identify key genes that switch off with ageing, highlighting them as potential targets for anti-ageing therapies

In a joint collaboration between King's College London and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, scientists have identified a group of 'ageing' genes that are switched on and off by natural mechanisms called epigenetic factors, influencing the rate of healthy ageing and potential longevity.

The path to personalised cancer treatment

The path to personalised cancer treatment

Researchers identify genetic markers of drug sensitivity in cancer cells

In the largest study of its kind, researchers have profiled genetic changes in cancer with drug sensitivity in order to develop a personalised approach to cancer treatments. The study is published in Nature on Thursday 29 March 2012.

Genetics of flu susceptibility

Genetics of flu susceptibility

Researchers find gene that can transform mild influenza to a life-threatening disease

A genetic finding could help explain why influenza becomes a life-threatening disease to some people while it has only mild effects in others. New research led by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has identified for the first time a human gene that influences how we respond to influenza infection.Researchers find gene that can transform mild influenza to a life-threatening disease

Subtle differences can lead to major changes in parasites

Subtle differences can lead to major changes in parasites

Researchers compare the genome of two parasites to explain differences in host range and transmission strategy

Researchers have found the subtle genetic differences that make one parasite far more virulent than its close relative.

Institute researcher awarded Brain Prize

Institute researcher awarded Brain Prize

Two European neuroscientists awarded the €1 million BRAIN PRIZE 2012 for their pioneering work on the genetics of hearing and deafness

The Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Foundation announced today (12 March) that The Brain Prize 2012 is jointly awarded to Professor Karen Steel from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Professor Christine Petit from College de France

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