News Archive - 2012

News Archive - 2012

Cause of rare growth disease discovered

Cause of rare growth disease discovered

Scientists hopeful discovery will provide a biological target for drug therapy

A rare genetic disease which causes some parts of the body to grow excessively has been linked to a cancer-associated mutation that drives cell growth, potentially paving the way for new treatments. The research findings were published today, 24 June, in Nature Genetics.

Genomics and African Queens

Genomics and African Queens

Diversity within Ethiopian genomes reveals imprints of historical events

Researchers have started to unveil the genetic heritage of Ethiopian populations, who are among the most diverse in the world, and lie at the gateway from Africa. They found that the genomes of some Ethiopian populations bear striking similarities to those of populations in Israel and Syria, a potential genetic legacy of the Queen of Sheba and her companions.

New build for bioinformatics

New build for bioinformatics

Ground is broken for new bioinformatics facility on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus

The new facility is made possible by a £75m grant from the UK government for the expansion of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) and its role in coordinating ELIXIR, the nascent research infrastructure for life science data.

Putting parasites on the world map

Putting parasites on the world map

Methods developed to enable large-scale analysis of malaria parasite genomes from patient blood samples

For the first time, researchers have the ability to analyse malaria genomes straight from patient blood samples using new sequencing technologies and informatics methods. This technique could be use to identify hotspots of malaria parasite evolution and track the rise of malarial drug resistance, faster and more efficiently than ever before.

Tracking MRSA in real time

Tracking MRSA in real time

Study highlights benefits of rapid whole-genome sequencing

In a new study released today in New England Journal of Medicine, researchers demonstrate that whole-genome sequencing can provide clinically relevant data on bacterial transmission within a timescale that can influence infection control and patient management.

Moving towards mitigating migraines

Moving towards mitigating migraines

Researchers identify new gene variants associated with the most common form of migraine

For the first time researchers have identified variations in or around genes that increase a person's susceptibility to developing the most common form of migraine. The team uncovered four new genetic variations that increase the risk of developing migraine without aura, where a migraine occurs without a sensory or motor disturbances signalling its onset.

Why resist insulin?

Why resist insulin?

Finding genes associated with insulin resistance

Researchers have uncovered six genetic regions that appear to affect resistance to the effects of insulin, which is important in many cases of type 2 diabetes. Previously, only two regions had been described.

Deciphering the life history of 21 breast cancers

Deciphering the life history of 21 breast cancers

Whole-genome sequencing used to determine the emergence of mutations over time

In a study published online by Cell on 17 May 2012, researchers have deciphered the life history imprinted on the genome of 21 breast cancers.

Mutational processes behind breast cancer

Mutational processes behind breast cancer

Researchers develop mutation catalogue to discover the processes behind 21 breast cancers

In a study published in Cell online on 17 May, researchers catalogue all the mutations in the genomes of 21 breast cancers and use the information to identify the mutational processes responsible for the development of these tumours.

Untangling the development of breast cancer

Untangling the development of breast cancer

Researchers announce the first comprehensive genome studies of the evolution of 21 breast cancers

In two back-to-back reports published online on 17 May in Cell, researchers have sequenced the genomes of 21 breast cancers and analysed the mutations that emerged during the tumours' development.

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