News Archive - 2012

News Archive - 2012

Royal Society recognises Institute International Researcher

Royal Society recognises Institute International Researcher

Dr Sam Kariuki receives the Royal Society Pfizer Award for his contribution to scientific research

The Royal Society Pfizer Award recognises a research scientist, at an early stage of their career, who is making an innovative contribution to biological and medical science and who has contributed significantly to capacity building in Africa by developing local research capabilities and promoting interactions between African and UK researchers. As well as the personal honour the award includes a grant of £60,000 to carry out a research project that is linked to an African centre of scientific excellence.

Genetic clues to the causes of primary biliary cirrhosis

Genetic clues to the causes of primary biliary cirrhosis

Researchers find new risk regions associated with primary biliary cirrhosis

Researchers have newly identified three genetic regions associated with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), the most common autoimmune liver disease, increasing the number of known regions associated with the disorder to 25.

Google Earth of Biomedical Research

Google Earth of Biomedical Research

An integrated encyclopaedia of DNA elements in the human genome

The ENCODE Project, today, announces that most of what was previously considered as 'junk DNA' in the human genome is actually functional. The ENCODE Project has found that 80 per cent of the human genome sequence is linked to biological function.

Human genome far more active than thought

Human genome far more active than thought

GENCODE Consortium discovers far more genes than previously thought

Among their discoveries, the team describe more than 10,000 novel genes, identify genes that have 'died' and others that are being resurrected. The GENCODE Consortium reference gene catalogue has been one of the underpinnings of the larger ENCODE Project and will be essential for the full understanding of the role of our genes in disease.

Near and far, nature and nurture

Near and far, nature and nurture

Study examines the genetic architecture of gene activity in twins to functionally link genes involved in human disease

A new study points the way to discover genetic variants that affect human health. It is the first study to use unique sets of samples from twins that mean the team can unpick the relative contributions of genetic variants in the genome and the environment in controlling the activity of key genes.

Metabolic MAGIC

Metabolic MAGIC

Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC) reveal new genetic regions influencing blood glucose traits

Researchers have identified 38 new genetic regions that are associated with glucose and insulin levels in the blood. This brings the total number of genetic regions associated with glucose and insulin levels to 53, over half of which are associated with type 2 diabetes.

Out of Europe

Out of Europe

Researchers look at the spread of dysentery from Europe to industrializing countries

The team pinpointed that S. sonnei was first established in Europe just a few centuries ago, but in the last few decades has spread to the rest of the world. They also found that a key factor in the spread of this pathogen was a rise in multidrug resistance - the ability to survive exposure to a wide array of antibiotics. Because S. sonnei is easily transmitted and has high levels of drug resistance, the researchers suggest that drug treatment and better sanitation alone will not be sufficient for controlling the disease. Vaccine development will be crucial.

Close to the bone

Close to the bone

100 gene deletions in mice identify nine genes associated with bone strength

All nine of the new genes discovered had not previously been implicated in skeletal disorders and were discovered by randomly screening different strains of mice engineered such that a single gene had been inactivated in their genome.

Royal Society recognises Institute researcher

Royal Society recognises Institute researcher

Dr Matthew Hurles will give the 2013 Royal Society Francis Crick lecture

Today's announcement (Tuesday 10 July) recognises Dr Hurles' significant contribution to the understanding of genetic variation in populations, specifically gains and losses of large segments of DNA and their clinical consequences.

New genetic culprits found in world-leading study of osteoarthritis

New genetic culprits found in world-leading study of osteoarthritis

Major new study finds clues to the genetic causes of osteoarthritis

Publishing their findings in The Lancet, the Arthritis Research UK-funded arcOGEN consortium has highlighted eight genetic regions linked to the development of osteoarthritis. Previously only three osteoarthritis genetic regions had been identified.

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