News Archive - 2012

News Archive - 2012

Bacterial DNA sequence used to map an infection outbreak

Bacterial DNA sequence used to map an infection outbreak

Researchers use genome sequencing to dissect and control an MRSA outbreak

For the first time, researchers have used DNA sequencing to help bring an infectious disease outbreak in a hospital to a close.

New national stem cell resource

New national stem cell resource

Wellcome Trust and MRC invest £13m to create a new national stem cell resource

The Wellcome Trust and Medical Research Council (MRC) today announced a £12.75 million initiative to create a catalogue of high-quality adult stem cells, so-called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). The initiative will provide a knowledge-base to underpin the use of such cells in studying the effects of our genes on health and disease and lay the foundations to create a new iPS cell bank, providing a world-class resource for UK researchers.

The fruit of 1000 genomes

The fruit of 1000 genomes

1000 genomes study is 'guidebook' to how genes vary

A landmark project that has sequenced 1,092 human genomes from individuals around the world will help researchers to interpret the genetic changes in people with disease.

Gut reaction: The evolution of IBD

Gut reaction: The evolution of IBD

Study finds immune response to bacterial infection may have shaped genetics of inflammatory bowel disease

In one of the largest studies of its kind, researchers have identified 71 genetic regions newly associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), increasing the total number discovered to date to 163. This new information reveals that there is a vast amount of genetic overlap between Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative colitis (the two most common subtypes of IBD), suggesting that they share common biological pathways.

The biggest expansion of man in prehistory?

The biggest expansion of man in prehistory?

Y chromosome sequencing reveals hitherto unknown second expansion in prehistory

This is the first time researchers have used the information from large-scale DNA sequencing to create an accurate family tree of the Y chromosome, from which the inferences about human population history could be made. Since the Y chromosome is found only in men, its history and evolution are easy to study and interpret.

C'est difficile

C'est difficile

Researchers develop cocktail of bacteria that eradicates Clostridium difficile infection in mice

In a new study out today, researchers used mice to identify a combination six naturally occurring bacteria that eradicate a highly contagious form of Clostridium difficile, an infectious bacterium associated with many hospital deaths. Three of the six bacteria have not been described before. This work may have significant implications for future control and treatment approaches. Researchers develop cocktail of bacteria that eradicates Clostridium difficile infection in mice

Alex Bateman takes on protein sequence services at the European Bioinformatics Institute

Alex Bateman takes on protein sequence services at the European Bioinformatics Institute

Highly cited leader of biological databases moves across campus from the Sanger Institute

One of the UK's leading computational biologists is stepping into a new role on the Genome Campus in Hinxton, UK. On 1 November, the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Alex Bateman becomes Head of Protein Sequence Resources at the EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI).

Award puts Africa diabetes under the microscope

Award puts Africa diabetes under the microscope

Institute researcher collaborates with African-led diabetes project

On Monday 8 October 2012, the Wellcome Trust and National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced much-needed funding for diabetes research in Africa. The £2.6 million award, part of the Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) Consortium, will be used by a network of research teams in seven African countries.

Babies learn the smell of mum

Babies learn the smell of mum

Newborn mice use mum's unique odour, not a pheromone, to begin suckling

Researchers show for the first time that a mammal begins to suckle its mother's milk through a learned response built on learning her unique combination of smells. When it is born, the newborn is exposed to the smell of its mother's amniotic fluid and the baby then responds to those smells to feed

Novel pathogen epidemic identified in sub-Saharan Africa

Novel pathogen epidemic identified in sub-Saharan Africa

Researchers track the spread of human invasive non-Typhoidal Salmonella in sub-Saharan Africa

A new study out today (Sunday 30 September) reveals that the emergence and spread of a rapidly evolving invasive intestinal disease, that has a significant mortality rate (up to 45 per cent) in infected people in sub-Saharan Africa, seems to have been potentiated by the HIV epidemic in Africa.

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