News Archive - 2011

News Archive - 2011

A knockout resource for mouse genetics

A knockout resource for mouse genetics

Mouse gene knockout resource will empower mammalian gene studies for a generation

An international consortium of researchers report today in Nature that they have knocked out almost 40 per cent of the genes in the mouse genome. The completed resource will power studies of gene activity in models of human disease.

Many migraines may have a common genetic basis

Many migraines may have a common genetic basis

Researchers find three genetic variants associated with common forms of migraine

A study into the genetic basis of many common forms of migraine has identified three variants that suggest that most forms of migraine have a shared genetic foundation, regardless of how they manifest in the people who have them.

We are all mutants

We are all mutants

First direct whole-genome measure of human mutation predicts 60 new mutations in each of us

The researchers measured directly the numbers of mutations in two families, using whole genome sequences from the 1000 Genomes Project. The results also reveal that human genomes, like all genomes, are changed by the forces of mutation: our DNA is altered by differences in its code from that of our parents. Mutations that occur in sperm or egg cells will be 'new' mutations not seen in our parents.

Bone cancer, from lab to clinic

Bone cancer, from lab to clinic

Dual approach will find mutations in osteosarcoma and develop tools to monitor disease in patients

A new study into osteosarcoma - cancer of the bone - will use advances in genomic research and analysis to identify new genes that give rise to the condition and to create personalised blood tests for children and young adults with the condition. The study is funded by Skeletal Cancer Action Trust, SCAT.

New strain of MRSA discovered

New strain of MRSA discovered

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in both humans and dairy cows

Scientists have identified a new strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) which occurs both in human and dairy cow populations.

'Master switch' gene for obesity and diabetes discovered

'Master switch' gene for obesity and diabetes discovered

Project picks out regulator affecting genes in fat tissue

A team of researchers, led by King's College London and the University of Oxford, have found that a gene linked to type 2 diabetes and cholesterol levels is in fact a 'master regulator' gene, which controls the behaviour of other genes found within fat tissues in the body.

Zebrafish provide insight into congenital muscular dystrophies

Zebrafish provide insight into congenital muscular dystrophies

'Protein packing factory' malfunction may underlie some forms of muscular dystrophies found in young children

Researchers have unmasked biological processes that may lead to a range of muscular dystrophies commonly known as dystroglycanopathies. The team used zebrafish to recapitulate various molecular and clinical aspects of the disease. Dystroglycanopathies are inherited neuromuscular disorders, the most severe forms of which affect young children.

A User's Guide to the Encyclopaedia of DNA Elements

A User's Guide to the Encyclopaedia of DNA Elements

International effort to decode human genes releases massive dataset and instructions for use

The international team of the ENCODE, or Encyclopedia Of DNA Elements, Project, have created an overview of their ongoing large-scale efforts to interpret the human genome sequence.

The gene processes that drive acute myeloid leukaemia

The gene processes that drive acute myeloid leukaemia

Researchers find genetic conspirators in the development of acute myeloid leukaemia

Researchers have described how the most common gene mutation found in acute myeloid leukaemia starts the process of cancer development and how it can cooperate with a well-defined group of other mutations to cause full-blown leukaemia.

Pages