News Archive - 2009

News Archive - 2009

UnMASCing diseases of the brain

UnMASCing diseases of the brain

Researchers uncover proteins underlying devastating brain diseases

Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have discovered a set of brain proteins responsible for some of the most common and devastating brain diseases. The proteins underlie epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disease, mental retardation and neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases.

Karen Steel elected Fellow of the Royal Society

Karen Steel elected Fellow of the Royal Society

Karen Steel, Principal Investigator at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, elected to the Royal Society

Professor Karen P Steel, of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, has been elected to the Fellowship of the Royal Society, the UK's most prestigious scientific organisation. The election recognises Professor Steel's position as a world leader in research into the genetics of hearing and deafness.

Prestigious awards in microbiology

Prestigious awards in microbiology

Senior Sanger Institute researchers, Professor Gordon Dougan and Professor Julian Parkhill awarded scientific Fellowships

Two of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's leading microbiologists have been honoured with awards from scientific Academies in the United States and UK . Professor Gordon Dougan has been elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology, while Professor Julian Parkhill was honoured by election to the Fellowship of the UK Academy of Medical Sciences.

Switches, circuits, brain and disease

Switches, circuits, brain and disease

Researchers uncover molecular circuits that control behaviour and diseases

Scientists today announce a breakthrough that will lead to fundamental new understanding of the workings of the brain and its diseases. Research teams, led by Professor Seth Grant and Dr Jyoti Choudhary, from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, have uncovered the first evidence that neurotransmitters control circuits of molecules inside synapses.

The genetic X-factor

The genetic X-factor

Nine new X chromosome genes associated with learning disabilities

A collaboration between more than 70 researchers across the globe has uncovered nine new genes on the X chromosome that, when knocked-out, lead to learning disabilities. The international team studied almost all X chromosome genes in 208 families with learning disabilities - the largest screen of this type ever reported.

DECIPHERing human disease

DECIPHERing human disease

Database provides a key to unlock the causes of illnesses

Today - five years after the inception of the DECIPHER database - researchers have published a report that reveals the developing role of the database in revolutionising both clinical practice and genetic research. The report explores the growing benefits of DECIPHER for researchers, clinicians and patients - highlighting how the data, provided by around 100 centres and shared openly worldwide, can benefit all three groups.

New insights into hearing loss

New insights into hearing loss

Human and mouse share hearing deficit caused by mutation in microRNA

In parallel studies in human and mouse, two groups of researchers have come to the same conclusion: that a new kind of gene is associated with progressive hearing loss. The new gene - called a microRNA - is a tiny fragment of RNA that affects the production of hundreds of other molecules within sensory hair cells of the inner ear.

Adding factors

Adding factors

Stem cells from more efficient reprogramming

Only four weeks ago, two reports outlined better approaches to produce embryonic stem cells by reprogramming adult cells. Today, work from labs in the UK and Japan take this one step further.

The lowdown on height genes

The lowdown on height genes

New study begins to uncover the skeletal basis of variation in height

A new study has delved deeper than ever before into understanding the genetic basis of adult human height. The study is the first of its kind, using exploratory statistical analyses to uncover how 17 genetic variants that are implicated in human height affect the length of particular skeletal components of the body, used as a proxy for height subcomponents.

Getting down to basics

Getting down to basics

Cancer mutations in the heart of gene regulation?

Researchers have identified a new cancer gene - one that is common to many cancers and affects the most basic regulation of our genes. The new example - a gene on the X chromosome called UTX - is found in 10 per cent of cases of multiple myeloma and 8 per cent of oesophageal cancers.

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