News Archive - 2008

News Archive - 2008

Crusader Y chromosomes in Lebanon

Crusader Y chromosomes in Lebanon

The most comprehensive genetic study yet on the world's ancient crossroads - Lebanon - reveals the legacies left by travellers to and invaders of Lebanon - showing that the Crusaders left chromosomes as well as castles. The results were obtained by a global team of Genographic scientists, led by Dr. Pierre Zalloua of Lebanese American University, Beirut and Dr. Chris Tyler-Smith of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, near Cambridge, UK.

Lebanese Christian men are more likely to carry genetic signatures found in Europe - and thought to have been carried there by the Crusades; Lebanese Muslim men are more likely to carry genetic signatures deriving from the Muslim expansions of the 7th and 8th centuries. This is one of the few times that scientists have been able to relate distinct genetic patterns to well-documented population movements within a geographic region.

Novel method to reveal drug targets

Novel method to reveal drug targets

Interactions between proteins studied on a global scale

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute scientists have developed a new large-scale method to identify the interactions between proteins that are a major target for therapeutic intervention. The novel method can identify the weak, short-lived interactions that are characteristic of cell responses to cues from the environment or from within the body.

Scientists reveal a new target to fight bad cholesterol

Scientists reveal a new target to fight bad cholesterol

Genetic link to levels of LDL cholesterol

Scientists have uncovered a new region in the genome that is responsible for the body's ability to regulate bad cholesterol which is linked to heart attack and stroke. Their findings are published in The Lancet.

International Consortium Announces the 1000 Genomes Project

International Consortium Announces the 1000 Genomes Project

Major sequencing effort will produce most detailed map of human genetic variation to support disease studies

An international research consortium today announced the 1000 Genomes Project, an ambitious effort that will involve sequencing the genomes of at least a thousand people from around the world to create the most detailed and medically useful picture to date of human genetic variation.

Taking Sequencing Forward

Taking Sequencing Forward

New Team to Lead DNA Sequencing at the Sanger Institute

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has recently made a major investment in new DNA sequencing technology which will increase production 60-fold. The Institute today announces the appointment of a new senior management team to lead the Institute's efforts to generate DNA sequence data of value to its core programmes and to the wider biomedical research community.

Changing patterns of infection

Changing patterns of infection

Chlamydia trachomatis genome sheds light on an emerging infection

Researchers have decoded the genome of the strain of Chlamydia that causes the most severe, invasive form of the disease. Their study shows that, despite recent increases in invasive infections, the strain has remained virtually unchanged for 40 years.

Pages