News Archive - 2008

News Archive - 2008

DNA chunks, chimps and humans

DNA chunks, chimps and humans

Marks of differences between human and chimp genomes

Researchers have carried out the largest study of differences between human and chimpanzee genomes, identifying regions that have been duplicated or lost during evolution of the two lineages. The study, published in Genome Research, is the first to compare many human and chimpanzee genomes in the same fashion.

Oblivious Oblivion

Oblivious Oblivion

New mouse mutant contains clue to progressive hearing loss

New research, published date in PLoS Genetics has defined a mutation in the mouse genome that closely mimics progressive hearing loss in humans. Extensive biological study of the mutants shows problems with the function of the sensory cells (hair cells) in the inner ear that ties in to hearing loss and occurs before clear physical effects are seen.

The Alphabet, Tyrian Purple...And Genes

The Alphabet, Tyrian Purple...And Genes

Genographic scientists uncover new piece of Phoenician legacy

The Phoenicians gave the whole world the alphabet and a love of the color purple, but a research study published today by Genographic scientists in the American Journal of Human Genetics shows that they left some people their genes as well. The study finds that as many as one in 17 men in the Mediterranean basin may have a Phoenician as a direct male-line ancestor.

Genome of a monkey human-malaria parasite

Genome of a monkey human-malaria parasite

Surprises from Plasmodium knowlesi genome sequence

Researchers have decoded the genome of a malaria parasite that has a host range from monkeys to man. Identified originally in monkeys, the parasite was first reported in a human infection just over 40 years ago.

Maps of Structural Variation released for Cancer Cell Lines

Maps of Structural Variation released for Cancer Cell Lines

Genomic Imbalances Revealed in Almost 800 Cancer Cell Lines

This core set of cancer cell lines includes samples from most types of human cancer; the study also included a series of over 460 normal control samples.

Making the Most of Genetic Data

Making the Most of Genetic Data

New Method for Reliable Detection of Copy Number Variants

Researchers have developed new methods to mine reliably the increasing collections of genetic data for the influence of copy-number variation (CNV). The extent of CNV in the human genome, in which regions of DNA might be deleted from or duplicated in different people, has only been appreciated in the past two or three years.

Defining DNA Differences to Track and Tackle Typhoid

Defining DNA Differences to Track and Tackle Typhoid

New-technology genome sequencing study reveals new genetic signatures

For the first time, next-generation DNA sequencing technologies have been turned on typhoid fever - a disease that kills 600,000 people each year. The results will help to improve diagnosis, tracking of disease spread and could help to design new strategies for vaccination.

Sanger Institute to help boost infection research

Sanger Institute to help boost infection research

A group including the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has today been chosen as one of two major consortia dedicated to research into healthcare associated infections and antibiotic resistance.

A total of £9m has been jointly awarded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Medical Research Council, National Institute for Health Research and Wellcome Trust through a competitive process to establish the two consortia.

Fifteen human genomes each week

Fifteen human genomes each week

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Hits 1 Terabase

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has sequenced the equivalent of 300 human genomes in just over six months. The Institute has just reached the staggering total of 1,000,000,000,000 letters of genetic code that will be read by researchers worldwide, helping them to understand the role of genes in health and disease. Scientists will be able to answer questions unthinkable even a few years ago and human medical genetics will be transformed.

Three Sequencing Companies Join 1000 Genomes Project

Three Sequencing Companies Join 1000 Genomes Project

Biotech Innovators Will Contribute to International Effort to Produce Most Detailed Map of Genetic Variation

Leaders of the 1000 Genomes Project announced today that three firms that have pioneered development of new sequencing technologies have joined the international effort to build the most detailed map to date of human genetic variation as a tool for medical research. The new participants are: 454 Life Sciences, a Roche company, Branford, Conn.; Applied Biosystems, an Applera Corp. business, Foster City, Calif.; and Illumina Inc., San Diego.

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